Martina Gedeck

Martina Gedeck

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Goldene Kamera Awards 2015 - Arrvials

Martina Gedeck - Shots of a host of stars as they arrive for the annual German Goldene Kamera Awards 2015 which were held at Messehallen in Hamburg, Germany - Saturday 28th February 2015

Martina Gedeck
Martina Gedeck

Goldene Kamera 2015 Part 2

Martina Gedeck and Markus Imboden - Shots of a host of stars as they arrive for the annual German Goldene Kamera Awards 2015 which were held at Messehallen in Hamburg, Germany - Friday 27th February 2015

65th Berlin International Film Festival (Berlinale) - Medienboard Reception (Empfang) - Arrivals

Martina Gedeck - 65th Berlin International Film Festival (Berlinale) - Medienboard Reception (Empfang) at The Ritz-Carlton, Berlin at Hotel The Ritz Carlton at Potsdamer Platz square - Berlin, Germany - Saturday 7th February 2015

Night Train To Lisbon Trailer


When a Latin professor, Raimund Gregorius (Jeremy Irons), sees a young Portuguese woman in a red coat about to throw herself from a bridge, he is compelled to save her. She wrestles her way out of the coat and runs off into the rain, leaving the bemused and mystified professor pondering what it all means. When he discovers a small book in the pocket of her coat, he begins to embark on an odyssey to find her, yet very soon he becomes more interested in the novel's author, Amadeu do Prado (Jack Huston). After discovering tickets for a train to Lisbon stuffed inside the book, Gregorius hastily boards the train himself, throwing caution to the wind, along with his normal, boring life. 

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64th Berlin International Film Festival (Berlinale)

Martina Gedeck and Markus Imboden - 64th Berlin International Film Festival (Berlinale) - 'Nymphomaniac' - Premiere - Berlin, Germany - Sunday 9th February 2014

Martina Gedeck and Markus Imboden
Martina Gedeck and Markus Imboden

70th Venice Film Festival - Jury Members - Photocall

Ryuchi Sakamoto, Renato Berta, Jiang Wen, Martina Gedeck, Bernardo Bertolucci, Andrea Arnold, Carrie Fisher and Virginie Ledoye - 70th Venice Film Festival - Jury Members - Photocall - Venice, Italy - Wednesday 28th August 2013

The Lives of Others Review


Essential
The Lives of Others is a rare film. It's a solemn work of art, a thrilling piece of entertainment, and a heart-wrenching portrait of both compassion and oppression. Set in East Berlin in 1984, the film starkly dramatizes the atmosphere of secrecy and paranoia enshrouding the totalitarian German Democratic Republic, and in so doing it betrays a strange German cultural taboo: The Lives of Others speaks ill of the living.

As writer-director Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck has noted in several interviews publicizing The Lives of Others, most German films made since the reunification portray East Germany comically, even nostalgically. Exemplifying this trend is 2003's casually ironic Goodbye, Lenin, whose plot centers on a young man's attempt to keep the fall of the Berlin Wall a secret from his mother after she wakes from a lengthy coma. It's a sweet, quirky movie, and many of its pleasures are derived from the bizarreness of its premise -- that a sane and decent person might rue the demise of the G.D.R. However, in Germany today, the prevalence of this curious, backward-seeming attitude extends far beyond film. Germans even have a name for it. They call it ostalgie (ost is the German word for east). Hip Berliners throw G.D.R. parties where they smoke notoriously awful East German cigarettes and drink East German rotgut while singing along to socialist party songs. One reason for these complicated feelings has to do with the present existence of the "villains" of the former government. Military officers, government officials, and members of the Stasi, the East German secret police, are still alive today, living normal lives among the rest of the German population, and as the years pass it becomes increasingly difficult to maintain the bitterness and scorn that these people once deserved.

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Mostly Martha Review


Excellent
If you're like me, a sucker for a good old fashion romance and someone who shamelessly loves to eat, then Mostly Martha offers all the perfect ingredients to more than satisfy your appetite. With a succulent array of gourmet meals constantly paraded across the screen, the film teases the taste buds with humor as tender as sautéed veal and romance as flavorful as aged wine, making for a hearty but appropriately low calorie love story.

First-time director Sandra Nettlebeck introduces Martha (Martina Gedeck) as an obsessive-compulsive chef at a chic restaurant in Hamburg, Germany, with no friends, no love interest, and no life other than an unparalleled knowledge of cuisine and the ability to cook any gourmet meal to perfection. As expected from an against-all-odds love story, Martha embodies the typically cinematic diamond-in-the-rough protagonist combining talent and beauty yet faced with a fatal flaw that plunges her into misery. Touted by her boss as "the second best chef in the city," she appears haughty and overly obsessed with "cooking by the book." In fact, in all her culinary glory she forgets that despite her impressive skills, the customer is always right. It becomes clear that Martha's manic tendencies must be overcome in order for her to gain personal fulfillment.

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