Martin Compston

Martin Compston

Martin Compston Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS

EIFF Opening Night Gala

Martin Compston - Arrivals at the Edinburgh International Film Festival Opening Night Gala red carpet. at Festival Theatre - Edinburgh, United Kingdom - Wednesday 17th June 2015

Martin Compston

Soccer Aid Manchester

José Mourinho, Santiago Cabrera and Martin Compston - Soccer Aid at Old Trafford Manchester, UK - Manchester, United Kingdom - Sunday 8th June 2014

José Mourinho
José Mourinho and Gordon Ramsay

Jed Mercurio to Adapt Lady Chatterley's Lover for BBC One


Vicky McClure Martin Compston

The BBC can’t get enough of Jed Mercurio; The Line of Duty creator is embarking on a third series of his popular crime drama, and he’s to start work on a Lady Chatterley’s Lover adaption for BBC 1.

Line of DutyLine of Duty was a hit for Mercurio

The book was last adapted for British television in 1993 with Joely Richardson as Lady Chatterley and Sean Bean as the gamekeeper, Mellors. It was a controversial novel when it when it was originally published in 1928, and was ban for almost 30 years shortly after its release. 

Continue reading: Jed Mercurio to Adapt Lady Chatterley's Lover for BBC One

Line of Duty Creator on Ending: "I'm Sorry Some People Have Been Disappointed"


Vicky McClure Martin Compston

'Line of Duty' has been hailed as one of the U.K’s best crime dramas alongside Luther and Broadchurch. But unlike those two shows – which both scored big at this week’s RTE Awards – Line of Duty’s ending left many feeling despondend, something the show’s creator Jed Mercurio has openly apologised for.

Line of DutyLine of Duty is a dead cert for a third season

“I’m sorry some people have been disappointed with the ending. I already mentioned in an earlier response that there would be things that some viewers would feel were important that weren’t dealt with, and I appreciate that can be frustrating,” he said. 

Continue reading: Line of Duty Creator on Ending: "I'm Sorry Some People Have Been Disappointed"

BBC2's "Line Of Duty" Returns To Disappointing Ratings, Loses Out To Comfy And Familiar "Midsummer Murders"


Lennie James Martin Compston Vicky McClure

When the BBC crime drama Line of Duty debuted two years ago, it was the biggest new drama the channel had had in a while. Not only did last night’s series 2 premiere fail to top that success, it didn’t even come close to matching it, despite critical success. So, what happened between then and now? Let’s talk ratings. The first series of the Jed Mercurio drama about police corruption had an overnight average of 3.2 million for its first run, ending with 3.5 million. Last night’s premiere didn’t even manage 2 million. Bearing in mind that the first episode of each season usually sees a notable spike in ratings, Line of Duty’s viewing numbers might drop even lower as this season progresses. Despite the guest appearance of Keeley Hawes in the first episode, Line of Duty only made it to 1.8 million viewers, according to The Guardian.

Line of Duty Still
The crime drama was a bit too heavy for the Thursday night crowd.

Meanwhile, ITV’s staple Midsummer Murders had a considerably better night. On its 100 episode anniversary, Midsummer registered 5.8 million viewers or 24,6% of those tuning in to the 8pm-10pm slot. The anniversary episode was set partly in Copenhagen, with Danish stars Ann Eleonora Jorgensen from the The Killing and Borgen's Birgitte Hjort Sorensen taking part in the centenary episode crime-solving shenanigans.

Continue reading: BBC2's "Line Of Duty" Returns To Disappointing Ratings, Loses Out To Comfy And Familiar "Midsummer Murders"

The Critics Are Delighted With Line of Duty's Return


Martin Compston Lennie James Vicky McClure

If there’s one thing the British viewing public love, it’s a solid crime drama, and Line of Duty delivers in spades. The critics have been really impressed the Line of Duty’s series 2 opener, calling it an exciting return to form.

Line of DutySerious business: Line of Duty

The procedural cop drama, which, unusually for its genre, is part improvised, blurs the lines between good and bad, often pointing the finger at law enforcement bodies. In that sense, it’s truly original, but it still adheres to the tropes of the crime drama, with brooding tension and plot twists along the way. But don’t take our word for her, here are what the critics had to say.

Continue reading: The Critics Are Delighted With Line of Duty's Return

Filth Review


Essential

As another full-on Irvine Welsh adaptation Trainspotting did in 1996, this bracingly original movie puts a new filmmaker on the map. Not only is this a loud blast of both style and substance, but it refuses to water down its subject matter, taking us through a shockingly profane story in a way that's both visually inventive and emotionally resonant.

This is the story of Bruce (McAvoy), an Edinburgh detective who's determined to beat his colleagues to a promotion. He's also a relentless womaniser, sexist, racist and drug addict. And he'll do anything to get ahead, hiding the sordid details of his private life from his boss (Sessions) while undermining the other cops at any chance while pretending to be their friends. In quick succession, he gets young Ray (Bell) addicted to cocaine, flirts continually with Amanda (Poots), has a fling with the kinky wife (Dickie) of fellow officer Gus (Lewis), torments Peter (Elliott) about his sexuality, and takes Bladesey (Marsan) on a sex-tourism holiday while making obscene calls to his needy wife (Henderson). All of this happens while Bruce leads the investigation into a grisly murder.

McAvoy dives so far into this role that we barely recognise him in there. Bruce is so amoral that we are taken aback by each degrading moment. And yet McAvoy somehow manages to hold our sympathy due to the film's blackly hilarious tone and a startling undercurrent of real emotion. Even though he's a monster, we see his boyish fragility, especially in surreal sequences involving his therapist (Broadbent), which merge with his fantasies, hallucinations and nightmares. 

Continue reading: Filth Review

Stiliyan Petrov Legends Charity Football Match

Martin Compston - The Celtic XI in the Stiliyan Petrov #19 Legends Charity Football Match - Glasgow, Scotland - Sunday 8th September 2013

Martin Compston
Martin Compston
Martin Compston

Filth - Red Band Trailer


This trailer is only suitable for persons aged 18 or over.

Bruce Robertson is a vile, devious and emotionally disturbed individual who also happens to be a Detective Sergeant. Off duty, he lives a life of debauchery; snorting line after line of cocaine and indulging in sordid sexual encounters with numerous women while trying to control his unpredictable bipolar personality. On duty, he does everything within his power to trick, deceive and ruin the lives of his colleagues with whom he competes to achieve a promotion to detective inspector. He does nothing to hide his radical views on race and women as he attempts to solve a grisly murder that seems to have more to it than he initially thought. With the web of lies he weaves throughout his life, will he be able to sort out truths from the untruths in order to maintain his sanity as his deteriorating mental health threatens to cripple him? And will he ever be reunited with the wife he is so desperate to resolve things with?

Adapted from the novel by Irvine Welsh, 'Filth' has been directed and written by Jon S. Baird ('Cass') and sees an intense star-studded cast convert to screen an compelling story of insanity, romance and deceit. This shocking 18-rated crime drama is set to hit UK cinemas in September 2013.

Picture - Paul Ferris; Martin Compston , Tuesday 15th January 2013

Paul Ferris; Martin Compston Cast members attend a photocall for new film 'The Wee Man' in Glasgow. The film depicts the life of notorious Glasgow gangland hardman Paul Ferris and tells the story of his life working for some of Glasgow's most infamous criminal families and his struggle to go straight. Featuring: Paul Ferris, Martin Compston Where: Glasgow, Scotland When: 15 Jan 2013

Paul Ferris and Martin Compston
Martin Compston and Paul Ferris
Paul Ferris and Martin Compston

Picture - Martin Compston; Stephen McCole; Laura... , Tuesday 15th January 2013

Martin Compston; Stephen McCole; Laura McMonagle; Ray Burdis; Paul Ferris Cast members attend a photocall for new film 'The Wee Man' in Glasgow. The film depicts the life of notorious Glasgow gangland hardman Paul Ferris and tells the story of his life working for some of Glasgow's most infamous criminal families and his struggle to go straight. Featuring: Martin Compston, Stephen McCole, Laura McMonagle, Ray Burdis, Paul Ferris Where: Glasgow, Scotland When: 15 Jan 2013

Martin Compston, Stephen McCole, Laura McMonagle, Ray Burdis and Paul Ferris
Martin Compston, Stephen McCole, Laura McMonagle, Ray Burdis and Paul Ferris
Martin Compston, Stephen McCole, Laura McMonagle, Ray Burdis and Paul Ferris

Sister Review


Excellent
A bracingly honest approach to flawed characters makes this small-scale Swiss drama thoroughly involving. And moving too. Most intriguing is how the writers and director have transformed what's essentially a rather dark, bleak story into something involving and emotionally resonant, all without ever turning sentimental.

It's set at the foot of a spectacular Alpine ski resort, where Simon (Klein) spends winter days travelling up and down the slopes, grabbing whatever isn't locked down, then selling the stolen goggles, gloves and even skis to help support his sister Louise (Seydoux). They live in a tiny flat, but Louise is annoyed that she has to take care of Simon, and she's usually off with yet another boyfriend. So Simon begins to turn to other people for a sense of family, including a ski-lift chef (Compston) who helps him with his scam and a foreign woman (Anderson) who seems like the ideal mother.

In their scenes together, Klein and Seydoux have a remarkably authentic chemistry that includes tiny jealousies, rivalries, private jokes and a fierce loyalty to each other. As we learn more about their past, this takes on new meaning that's both warmly touching and darkly chilling at the same time. These two may have a difficult life, but they're enjoying it as much as they can. And their complicated relationship is packed with moments of tenderness that undercut the resentment.

The film is shot in an off-handed way that pulls us into each scene. The great cinematographer Agnes Godard captures the staggering beauty of the Alps along with tellingly intimate moments, contrasting their grim block of flats with the soaring natural scenery. And while some of the side characters feel a little contrived, they help us understand Louise and Simon in ways that catch us aback. This is a raw, unusually sensitive portrait of two people whose personal connection drives them crazy even as it gives them hope.

Rich Cline

When the Lights Went Out Review


Good
Based on an outrageous true story, this is essentially Britain's own Amityville Horror, as a family haplessly moves into a house occupied by a noisy, terrifying ghost. The filmmakers create a strong freak-out atmosphere, jolting us out of our seats several times along the way, but some plot points ring false and some scenes feel a bit silly.

It's 1974 when Jenny and Len (Ashfield and Waddington) move into a new home.

They're delighted with the increase in space and the lovely Yorkshire setting, but their 17-year-old daughter Sally (Connor) is annoyed that her life has been disrupted. And the rolling blackouts don't help either, especially since the darkness seems to reveal something malevolent lurking in the shadows.

Continue reading: When the Lights Went Out Review

Piggy Review


Weak
Stylish filmmaking makes this dark thriller worth a look, even if the tricky premise feels rather stale. We understand from the start what writer-director Hawkes is doing here, so the way it plays out feels frustratingly flat, especially as the grisliness escalates.

Working as a messenger in London, Joe (Compston) is a loner who doesn't like to be around people but is bored with his repetitive, numb life. Things improve when he reconnects with older brother John (Maskell) and his girlfriend Claire (Dylan). But Joe is terrified of violence, and rightly so, as both he and John are attacked in the streets. Then he meets John's street-thug friend Piggy (Anderson), who wears a rubber pig-nose as a disguise. He makes Joe feel eerily safe as he teaches him how to get revenge.

Continue reading: Piggy Review

Piggy Trailer


Introverted but polite young man Joe is overcome with grief after beloved brother John is murdered by a violent gang following a heated disagreement in the local pub. The bereavement incites the arrival of one of John's old friends, Piggy, at his brother's doorstep.

Continue: Piggy Trailer

Martin Compston

Martin Compston Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS