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The Godfather House Is Up For Sale


Marlon Brando The Godfather

The iconic home of the Corleone clan from Francis Ford Coppla’s 1972 classic The Godfather has gone on sale in New York for a whopping $2.89m (£1.85m). Marlon Brando was the man of that house in the Oscar-winning film as ruthless mafia boss Vito Corleone.

The Godfather
The Godfather is widely considered to be one of the greatest movies of all time

In reality, the house on Staten Island belonged to the Norton family, a loving-unit that one would assume was far less crime-centred than the on-screen household.

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Eva Marie Saint Discusses Marlon Brando, Cary Grant & Paul Newman On Upcoming TCM Interview


Eva Marie Saint Paul Newman Cary Grant Marlon Brando Alfred Hitchcock Elizabeth Taylor Elia Kazan

Eva Marie Saint's upcoming appearance on TCM on Monday night (31st March) promises to restore our faith in Hollywood. The actress, who will celebrate her 90th birthday in July, has sat down with presenter Robert Osborne in a TCM special which will include an interview about her life and career and three of her best known films.

Eva Saint Marie
Eva Saint Marie discussed her former colleagues in the TCM interview.

On the Waterfront, for which Saint received an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress and starred opposite Marlon Brandon, will kick off the night's festivities at 9pm. Another two of her films, Raintree County (in which she played opposite Montgomery Cliff and Elizabeth Taylor) and North by Northwest (also starring Cary Grant and directed by Alfred Hitchcock) will conclude the evening of celebration.

Continue reading: Eva Marie Saint Discusses Marlon Brando, Cary Grant & Paul Newman On Upcoming TCM Interview

Guys and Dolls Remake: Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Channing Tatum In Talks


Joseph Gordon-Levitt Channing Tatum Frank Sinatra Marlon Brando Fox

20th Century Fox has landed the movie rights to Guys and Dolls, the classic movie starring Frank Sinatra and Marlon Brando itself based on a successful musical, and will start the process of a remake potentially starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Channing Tatum, according to Deadline.com. A writer and director is yet to be announced, though Fox are keen to pin down its lead stars first.

The remake of the movie is big news in Hollywood, especially among acting circles, where the lead roles are considered the most sought after in the business. A few years it, Harvey Weinstein was close to getting the rights to the movie, with Chicago producers Craig Zadan and Neil Moron producing. Russell Crowe, Hugh Jackman and even Vin Diesel tossed their hats into the ring for the movie, though the widow of songwriter Frank Loesser didn't find the deal to her liking and declined to sign over the rights.

Now, she appears pretty happy for Fox to take on the story about rogue gamblers and gangsters in the 1920s and 1930s. Nathan Sinatra (Sinatra's role) has a town full of captive gamblers and wants to set up a floating crap game but requires the funds to do it. He bets his friend Sky Masterson (Brando) that he can't get Sarah Brown to go with him to Havana. The role of the love interest will no doubt be the subject of a competitive casting process featuring many of Hollywood's top actresses. 

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Lincoln's Daniel-Day Lewis To Outdo Brando, Penn, Hanks With Oscar Win


Daniel Day Lewis Marlon Brando Hugh Jackman Denzel Washington Joaquin Phoenix Tom Hanks Nick Nolte Steven Spielberg

Daniel Day-Lewis will make Oscar history on February 26, 2013, when - as expected - he takes the Academy Award for Best Actor for his role in Steven Spielberg's critically acclaimed Lincoln. Should Hugh Jackman, Bradley Cooper, Joaquin Phoenix or even Denzel Washington steal away the gong, it would almost certainly represent the biggest Best Actor shock since Robert Benigni somehow usurped Tom Hanks and Nick Nolte to the award in 1999. Though Jack Nicholson was considered the favourite, Day-Lewis could have had another award in 2003, (Gangs Of New York) had Adrien Brody not upset the apple-cart for his role in The Pianist.

As 'Lincoln' prepares to hit screens in the UK, critics have seized the opportunity to laud Day-Lewis' performance - "legend", "genius" and "one of the greats" are words and phrases found in almost every review. Ian Nathan of Empire Magazine said, "As unexpected as it is intelligent, thanks to virtuoso work from Spielberg and Kushner, Lincoln is landmark filmmaking, while Day-Lewis is so authentic he pulls off that stovepipe." Matthew Turner of ViewLondon said, "Impressively directed and superbly written, this is an absorbing and enjoyable political drama with an Oscar-worthy central performance from Daniel Day-Lewis." Shaun Munro of What Culture agreed, writing, "Daniel Day-Lewis gives yet another performance for the ages in Steven Spielberg's admirably literate, thoroughly charming biopic."

Daniel Day Lewis, Oscars 2008Daniel Day Lewis, Nine Premiere

Continue reading: Lincoln's Daniel-Day Lewis To Outdo Brando, Penn, Hanks With Oscar Win

Apocalypse Now Redux Review


Essential
Just issued on a remastered DVD, Coppola's 1979 masterpiece gets the director's cut treatment in this Redux version, as 49 minutes of previously edited footage are reinserted to bring the film in line with the director's original vision.

And the result is stunning, making an astonishing film even more powerful ...

but changing it completely in the process.

Continue reading: Apocalypse Now Redux Review

Mutiny on the Bounty (1962) Review


Weak
They don't make films like Mutiny on the Bounty anymore. The road show spectacular is a lost art that has disappeared along with 70mm cameras. But in 1962, MGM's remake of the Gable-Laughton Mutiny of the Bounty was the most breathtaking of all the big super-productions coming out of Hollywood. Exciting, colorful, no expense spared (the studio even constructed its own exact copy of the H.M.S. Bounty with craftsmen laboring at wooden hull construction), a cast of thousands (when that really meant a cast of thousands), the pageantry of real Tahitian locations, Mutiny on the Bounty was a massive, awesome extravaganza.

With veteran director Lewis Milestone at the helm (this was to be his final feature), Bounty shoves off in impressive form. As in the 1935 version, the film chronicles the repressive and sadistic Captain Bligh's (Trevor Howard) attempts to corner the market in breadfruit for England by traveling to the South Seas and First Lt. Fletcher Christian's (Marlon Brando) mutiny, casting Bligh to sea in a rickety boat with a handful of allies as the mutineers set sail back to Tahiti.

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Julius Caesar Review


Extraordinary
"Caesar! Beware of Brutus. Take heed of Cassius. Come not near Casca. Have an eye to Cinna. Trust not Trebonius. Mark not well Metellus Cimber. Decius Brutus loves thee not. Thou hast wronged Caius Ligarius. There is but one mind in all these men and it is bent against Caesar. If thou beest not immortal, look about you. Security gives way to conspiracy."

Artemidorus's warnings to Julius Caesar, soon to be given dictatorial powers in Rome, falls upon Caesar's deaf -- and soon dead -- ears and the Roman conqueror trundles off to the Senate to be stabbed to death by his best friends. In Shakespeare's play, the rejection of the warning by Artemidorus is more fodder for Caesar's ballooning ego. In Joseph Mankeiwicz's 1953 film version of Shakespeare's classic, Artemidorus's warning is like a howl in the wilderness. For Mankiewicz, adapting and directing during the height of the period of the blacklist, the warning takes on a different context of a McCarthyesque conspiracy to bring down society, a mass madness so potent that even honorable men become embroiled in the hothouse hysteria.

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The Teahouse of the August Moon Review


OK
When Marlon Brando is first encountered in The Teahouse of the August Moon, Daniel Mann's 1956 film version on John Patrick's Pulitzer Prize winning comedy of 1953, you want to fight back. Here is Brando in comic Asian stereotype mode, playing Okinawan interpreter Sakini -- Brando hunched over obsequiously, his eyes jury-rigged Oriental style and speaking in an Okinawan accent, and you think, "Brando, you should be ashamed of yourself." But then movie memory kicks in and you recall nasty and virulent racial debauches like Mickey Rooney's Mr. Yunioshi in Breakfast at Tiffany's and Brando's downplaying doesn't look so bad after all. Although watching a tall American white guy play a short translator from Okinawa is still discomforting, at least you don't feel compelled to rise up and heave your boots through the TV.

Sakini is the audience's guide and master of ceremonies (he beckons the audience into the film by way of a direct address to the camera) in this sharp and funny comedy about American imperialism after the end of World War II. Sakini is the interpreter for the pompous American commander Colonel Purdy (played by Paul Ford, recreating his Broadway performance, a role he would later hone to perfection as the iconic Colonel Hall in Sgt. Bilko), a windbag idiot who makes declarations like, "I'm going to teach these natives the meaning of democracy if I have to shoot every one of them" (Donald Rumsfeld couldn't have said it better). Purdy orders the bumbling Captain Fisby (Glenn Ford, in a fine comic turn, channeling Charlie Ruggles) to lord it over a small Okinawan village and give the villagers a taste of benevolent American democratic dictatorship by making the villagers build a school and organize a "Ladies League For Democratic Action." Sakini goes along with him.

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The Formula Review


Grim
Cynical paranoia was a big cash cow for best-selling thrillers in the 1970s, and one of the biggest of those bestsellers was Steven Shagan's The Formula. Reacting to the oil crisis of the mid-'70s, when the OPEC nations banded together to manufacture oil shortages, push up gas prices, and create anguish, grief, and gas lines throughout a gas-guzzling United States, Shagan hatched a conspiracy plot involving a non-polluting, synthetic fuel formula. Developed by the Nazis during World War II, the formula fell into the hands of the Allies and was suppressed by the American oil conglomerates to prevent the destruction of the oil industry. (After all, if the economic power of the U.S. is in free fall, it must have something to do with the Nazis). Brought to the screen by Shagan (as writer and producer) and enlisting the services of director John G. Avildsen (then a hot few years after his smash Rocky), the film version of The Formula features the casting coup of the decade with George C. Scott and Marlon Brando in the lead roles (an earlier version of Righteous Kill's teaming of past-their-primes De Niro and Pacino, only more fun).

The film begins disconcertingly in the middle of a hellish battle during the final days of World War II, a chaotic prologue featuring gargantuan explosions, fleeing Nazis, and stampeding elephants. Then in a whiplash inducing segue, the film settles in to Los Angeles in the late 1970s, where Scott plays loner LAPD detective Barney Caine ("There's only two things that matter to me -- my son and my work. The rest of my life is a complete zero."), investigating the killing of his old pal Tom Neeley (Robin Clarke). The crime scene is laid out like the opening scene of a Charlie Chan movie with mysterious clues all about -- a voodoo doll, a map with the name "Oberman" scrawled on it, a folded newspaper with the letter G-E-N-E written in blood -- and Caine falls for the setup to avenge the death of his friend.

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Picture - Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital Hollywood, California, Saturday 26th January 2008

Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital and Marlon Brando Saturday 26th January 2008 where Christian Brando died of pneumonia. Son of the late actor Marlon Brando – was admitted to Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center Jan. 11, according to his ex-wife Deborah. Brando was in a coma and on a ventilator while hospitalized. Hollywood, California

Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital and Marlon Brando
Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital and Marlon Brando
Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital and Marlon Brando

Picture - A Marlon Brando Western Union... Las Vegas, Nevada, Thursday 31st May 2007

Marlon Brando Thursday 31st May 2007 A Marlon Brando Western Union telegram to Michael Jackson dated July 6, 1984 that reads: "Dear Michael, Thinking about you this evening. Please try not to make an ass of yourself and please for God's sake don't fall in the orchestra pit, Michael." on display at the Michael Jackson family auction at the Hard Rock Casino & Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada

Reflections in a Golden Eye Review


Excellent
Based on a Carson McCullers novella, Reflections in a Golden Eye is a sordid Southern Gothic melodrama that peeks into the bedroom windows of the officers of a rural army base and finds... depravity! With an A-list cast and the leering directorial eye of John Huston, it's lots of dirty fun.

Huston's most interesting decision was to riff off the title and shoot the entire picture in a golden sepia tone with only occasional splashes of color. The print was pulled from theaters when people didn't get it, but on DVD you can see it the way Huston intended, and it's unlike anything you've seen before.

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A Streetcar Named Desire Review


Excellent
Stella! Stella!

Oh, Stella. What have you gotten yourself into, marrying a drunken boor and living in a squalid flat in New Orleans?

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Superman Review


Good
Yeah, it was 1978 when Superman first hit theaters in the version most of us remember -- with Christopher Reeve as the Man of Steel and Marlon Brando as his disco-inspired pop. Superman is a lovable epic full of quaint nostalgia and incredible mysteries of logic (because if the earth spun the other way round, time would apparently reverse... riiiight). The story tells the bulk of the Superman legend -- his escape from Krypton, coming to terms with his powers as a youth in Smallville, moving to big old Metropolis and becoming Clark Kent (and falling for crusty Lois Lane), and dealing with a Lex Luthor (Gene Hackman, excellently over the top) plan to buy up real estate in Nevada and then destroy most of California, thus making his new coastline worth millions. Watch for Terence Stamp's Zod in the first scene -- he'll be back to rule as one of cinema's great villains in Superman II.

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Apocalypse Now Review


Essential
In the grand tradition of movies that explore the reality that is the Vietnam War, one film stands out -- for defying reality.

Martin Sheen stars as Captain Willard, sent upriver in war-torn 'Nam to "terminate, with extreme prejudice" one Colonel Kurtz (Brando), a former green beret who has gone primal all the way in Cambodia and has taken on the guise of a god to the local people of the area.

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Marlon Brando

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