Marlee Matlin

Marlee Matlin

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2015 We Day - Performance

Marlee Matlin - A variety of stars performed at the 2015 We Day held which was held at the Allstate Arena in Rosemont, Chicago, Illinois, United States - Thursday 30th April 2015

Marlee Matlin
Marlee Matlin
Marlee Matlin

Dancing with the Stars 10 Year Anniversary Party

Marlee Matlin - Dancing with the Stars 10 Year Anniversary Party at Greystone Manor - West Hollywood, California, United States - Wednesday 22nd April 2015

4th Annual American Humane Association Hero Dog Awards

Marlee Matlin - The Beverly Hilton Hotel was the venue for the 4th Annual American Humane Association Hero Dog Awards which saw a variety of stars attend in Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 27th September 2014

Marlee Matlin
Marlee Matlin
Marlee Matlin
Marlee Matlin
Marlee Matlin

Actress Marlee Matlin From ABC's 'Family's Switched at Birth' at the Empire state Building in New York City.

Marlee Matlin - Actress Marlee Matlin From ABC's 'Family's Switched at Birth' at the Empire state Building in New York City. - New York, New York, United States - Monday 4th March 2013

Marlee Matlin
Marlee Matlin
Marlee Matlin
Marlee Matlin
Marlee Matlin

Actress Quvenzhane Wallis, 9, Reveals Who She Would Thank In Oscars Speech


Quvenzhane Wallis Marlee Matlin

In a joint interview with Marlee Martin, Quvenzhane Wallis revealed who she would thank, if she found herself onstage accepting the Oscar for Best Actress, on Sunday evening (February 24, 2013). The nine year old has been nominated for her performance as the character Hushpuppy, in the movie The Beasts of the Southern Wild and if she is successful, she will become the youngest ever person to win the award.

Speaking alongside the actress who currently holds that title, Marlee Matlin, Wallis told The Hollywood Reporter that she would thank God, first and foremost and added “and thank you for who gave me this and thanks for all the people who were before me.” At that point, Matlin jokingly suggested that Quvenzhane should be remembering to thank her, too, to which Wallis nodded, and gestured, telling her “I’ll make sure.” Matlin, who won the Oscar for her performance in the 1986 movie Children of a Lesser God, was full of praise for Wallis. “In my eyes, you’re a winner,” she told the young actress and reminded her that even being nominated is a serious accolade and a huge achievement for one so young.

Quvenzhane Wallis is the long-shot for the award, according to the bookies. Still, if she won, at least she has some kind of a speech prepared, if she manages to remember it once she’s on stage. Matlin recalled that her heart was “beating out of my chest” when she collected her award, at the age of 21. 

Continue reading: Actress Quvenzhane Wallis, 9, Reveals Who She Would Thank In Oscars Speech

The Hollywood Reporter Nominees Night 2013

Marlee Matlin (shoe detail) - The Hollywood Reporter Nominees Night 2013 Beverly Hills California United States Monday 4th February 2013

Marlee Matlin
Marlee Matlin
Marlee Matlin
Marlee Matlin
Marlee Matlin

Excision Review


Good

There's an element of parody to this jet-black comedy, but the film is so creepy that it gets under our skin. And even if it feels a bit ridiculous, the story challenges us with an exploration of bullying and social pressure that's deeply unsettling. All while writer-director Bates gleefully keeps us off-balance with a shifting mix of broad comedy and growing horror.

It's also a deranged coming-of-age tale about Pauline (McCord), a teen outcast who delusionally believes that she is destined to be a great surgeon. This is mainly because she wants to cure her sister Grace (Winter) of cystic fibrosis. So she teaches herself surgical skills by piercing her nose, among other things. She also propositions a hot classmate (Sumpter) about losing her virginity, partly because this is in her master plan and partly to annoy his mean-girl girlfriend (McCook), and he doesn't refuse. Meanwhile, her mother (Lords) makes it clear that she doesn't like Pauline, treating her husband (Bart) like dirt while doting on Grace.

The film's opening scenes are like a Todd Solondz movie, with grotesque characters saying staggeringly rude things to each other. And as events unfold, each person develops some complexity that makes them intriguing. It also helps that scenes are packed with lively side characters played by starry veterans. McDowell, Matlin and Wise play school employees who are baffled by Pauline's refusal to toe the line. And Waters is dryly hilarious as the sardonic priest Pauline is forced to see for counselling. 

Continue reading: Excision Review

Walker Review


Excellent
Following his one-two punch of cultic cinema, Repo Man and Sid & Nancy, director Alex Cox went on to make two more films that consecrated his reputation as, well, a malcontent. It was 1987 and Cox's latest film, Straight to Hell, was universally panned, not completely unfairly. But just five months later, Cox returned with Walker, an equally-batty spectacle built on the last years of the late-19th-century soldier-of-fortune William Walker and his conquest of Nicaragua. Given only a paltry release in December '87, Cox's film maudit was banished to the realm of VHS for two decades before Criterion took an interest and decked it out with all the trimmings.

Far too crazy to be fatalist, Walker strangely begins on a moment of near-defeat for the titular batshit commando (the phenomenal Ed Harris) and his madcap battalion. Saved by a sandstorm and his lawyer, Walker finds himself back in the arms of his love Ellen Martin (Marlee Matlin). The fact that Ephraim Squier (Richard Masur) holds the keys to Walker's future in politics doesn't stop Ellen from asking Squier to fornicate with swine. Soon enough, Walker is trading away his future with Ellen for a mission to Nicaragua at the behest of Squier and Cornelius Vanderbilt (Peter Boyle).

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What the #$*! Do We Know? Review


Terrible
What the #$*! Do We Know? is one of the hottest independently released films of the summer, as well as one of a handful of high grossing documentaries released in the past couple of years. Playing in a few specialty houses since summer it has - thus far - racked up an impressive $5 million.

The film -- directed by Mark Vicente, Betsy Chasse, and William Arntz -- purports to be about quantum mechanics, biological addictions, and the redefinition of objective reality and human consciousness. Using various talking heads, a lamely directed fictional story about a depressed woman photographer (Marlee Matlin) that parallels the subject matter, an electronica score, and a whole bunch of colorful graphics, the film simultaneously stimulates us with puzzling science at the same time that it foists upon us a New Age philosophy.

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Children Of A Lesser God Review


Good
In my mind there are two types of metaphor movies: those that kick and those that scream. Those that scream take their metaphors and make them painfully obvious to the viewer. We can't help but notice them. Those that kick, on the other hand, have metaphors that are silent and effective. Children of a Lesser God was a metaphor movie that kicked.

Based on the stage play, Children of a Lesser God is a metaphor movie about a hearing man's romance with a deaf woman. On the surface, it functions as a sympathy grabber for the hearing disabled, and a movie we can smile at because of William Hurt's gallant attempt to help deaf children speak, live normal lives, and, even, sing (albeit to cheesy songs but in one of the most fun and touching scenes captured on film). That is the skin deep surface, which would have been enough to make it a crowd pleaser and would have kept it from being torn to pieces by the critics.

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Two Shades of Blue Review


Unbearable
Good lord, a more wretched film couldn't be made if you set out to do it. This contrived, late-night Cinemax affair takes a blackmail plot, a murder plot, another murder plot, an insurance scandal -- and tries to tie it all together with the TDD phone service for the deaf as a plot device. Of course it stars Marlee Matlin -- and my, how far you have fallen, Marlee -- in her worst role ever. Busey and Roberts couldn't be hammier. And worst of all is Rachel Hunter, unintentionally made up to look like a drag queen, I kid you not. As a final insult, I'm pretty sure the titular Two Shades of Blue refer to her panties. Pap.

What The #$*! Do We Know?! Review


OK

Reminiscent of Carl Sagan's PBS series "Cosmos" in its disposition and its tone of wonderment, "What the #$*! Do We Know?!" is a fascinating, nearly uncategorizable movie hybrid. A documentary about the theoretical inter-relationship of spirituality, biology and quantum physics, its intricate existential concepts are wrapped around a fictional story, used to illustrate and make comprehensible all the heavy-thinking wild notions proffered by enthusiastic science wonks and philosophers interviewed in non-fiction portions of the picture.

It's a film that fires the mind with scores of terrific, circular scientific quandaries, such as the fact that experiencing, remembering and imagining an event all trigger the exact same signals in the exact same areas of the brain. So, the movie asks, what is reality and how can one tell? It also delves into under-examined notions of biology (heroin uses the same receptors on human cells as the chemicals triggered by emotions), physics (the fundamental laws of which don't recognize time), and even religion. Jesus' preaching about the mustard seed being larger than the kingdom of heaven is "pure Quantum physics" says one interviewee. Another adds, "We're living on the tip of the quantum iceberg."

By loosely tying all this into the interwoven narrative about a deaf photographer (Marlee Matlin from "Children of a Lesser God") slowly emerging from a deep and bitter post-divorce funk, writer-directors William Arntz, Betsy Chasse and Mark Vicente provide an affecting accessibility that gradually paints a very large picture of a universe more ordered and interconnected -- and yet more mysterious -- than mankind has hitherto imagined.

Continue reading: What The #$*! Do We Know?! Review

Marlee Matlin

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