Mark Pellegrino

Mark Pellegrino

Mark Pellegrino Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS

Full Of Young Talent, 'We Gotta Get Out Of This Place' Premieres At Toronto Film Festival [Clip]


Mark Pellegrino

We Gotta Get Out Of This Place, which premiered at Toronto Film Festival over the weekend, tells the story of Billy Joe – a Texan teen who makes his living working on a cotton farm. The movie is a directors Simon and Zeke Hawkins’ feature debut, a gritty coming-of-age story featuring crime, vengeance and some truly misguided decisions.

Pellegrino gives a career defining performance.
Pellegrino gives a career defining performance.

Billy Joe’s friends, Sue and Bobby, are about to leave the dead-end town to attend college, but Billy Joe wants to give them a sendoff to remember with one final bender at Corpus Christi. In order to get the money, he foolishly decides to rob an office safe, belonging to his boss, Giff. Unfortunately, Billy Joe soon learns that Giff is completely cold-blooded and will stop at nothing to get the money back. It turns out the cash belonged to a local gangster, known as Big Red. Backed into a corner, our protagonist is forced to confess to the theft, putting his own life and those of his friends in imminent danger. This then leads him further down a path of crime in an attempt to settle his debt.

Continue reading: Full Of Young Talent, 'We Gotta Get Out Of This Place' Premieres At Toronto Film Festival [Clip]

We Gotta Get Out Of This Place Trailer


Billy Joe is a Texan teen who earns his living on a cotton farm. It's only a matter of weeks before his best friends Sue and Bobby leave the town to attend college but Billy Joe wants to give them one last weekend to remember on a Corpus Christi party bender. Strapped for cash, he foolishly robs a stack of cash from the safe in the office of his ruthless boss Giff, but the next time he sees him, he's beating the almighty hell out of one of the Mexican workers accusing him of being the thief. Billy is forced to come clean, but immediately puts his and his friends' lives at risk. The only thing they can do to save themselves is embark on a reckless mission to rob some local money-launderers in order to pay back the money, because if they don't, they'll have a furious gangster named Big Red to answer to.

Continue: We Gotta Get Out Of This Place Trailer

Madeleine Mantock, Mark Pellegrino and Peyton List - CW, CBS and Showtime 2013 Summer TCA Party - Arrivals - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Monday 29th July 2013

Madeleine Mantock, Mark Pellegrino and Peyton List
Madeleine Mantock
Madeleine Mantock
Peyton List, Madeleine Mantock and Aaron Yoo
Madeleine Mantock

Mark Stern, Amy Aquino, Kristen Hager, Sam Huntington, Meaghan Rath, Sam Witwer, Mark Pellegrino, Anna Fricke and Dave Howe - Mark Stern, Amy Aquino, Kristen Hager, Sam Huntington, Meaghan Rath, Sam Witwer, Mark Pellegrino, Anna Fricke, Dave Howe Beverly Hills, California, United States The Paley Center For Media Presents An Evening with SyFy's "Being Human" Season Three Premiere & Panel held at The Paley Center For Media Tuesday 8th January 2013

Mark Stern, Amy Aquino, Kristen Hager, Sam Huntington, Meaghan Rath, Sam Witwer, Mark Pellegrino, Anna Fricke and Dave Howe
Kristen Hager
Kristen Hager
Kristen Hager, Sam Huntington, Meaghan Rath, Sam Witwer and Anna Fricke
Kristen Hager, Sam Huntington, Meaghan Rath and Sam Witwer
Kristen Hager

Mark Pellegrino - Thursday 13th January 2011 at NBC Pasadena, California

Mark Pellegrino
Mark Pellegrino

Caffeine Review


Terrible
Something's always brewing at the Black Cat Café, or so they say. The advertisers behind the new independent film Caffeine want us to believe there's plenty of activity at the quirky London café. Sadly, it's not so. In fact, it's so boring that even a double-shot espresso isn't strong enough to keep to your eyes open.

Caffeine follows a series of odd events during the lunch rush at the Black Cat Café, where one disaster after another is served up as the day's "blue plate special." For example, the cook (Callum Blue) is fired by the manager, Rachel (Marsha Thomason), after she finds out he's been unfaithful to her. Rachel has no one else qualified to cook, so she throws the chef's hat to a server named Tom (Mark Pellegrino), who can't even make lasagna from a written recipe. But Rachel has no other choices. Her two other employees, Vanessa (Mena Suvari) and Dylan (Breckin Meyer) spend more time on smoke breaks then they do serving coffee.

Continue reading: Caffeine Review

The Number 23 Review


Terrible
There are at least 23 ways in which The Number 23 sucks. The most important revolves around its inability to distinguish creepiness from cliché. It fails to realize that there's not nearly enough weed on this planet for its supposedly deep observations to blow your mind. As a result, moments meant to instill fear either evoke boredom or, more often, the giggles.

The movie begins with what has to be the 23rd re-enactment of the Seven credits that were groundbreaking 12 years ago. They do, however, feature a treasure trove of fun facts about the number 23 such as the Mayans predicting that the world would end in 2012. 20 + 12 = 32, which is 23 backwards; get it? Like I said, not nearly enough weed.

Continue reading: The Number 23 Review

Ellie Parker Review


OK
Hollywood is as overstuffed with films on aspiring actors as it is actual aspiring actors. So, why one more? Well, Naomi Watts, for one thing. Playing the title role in Ellie Parker, the story of a professionally and emotionally befuddled Hollywood actress, Watts, star of such films as Mulholland Drive, 21 Grams, and The Ring, brings aboard expected depth, charm, and frenetic intensity.

Thing is, it's not enough. There's a decent turn by Rebecca Rigg, as Ellie's realist gal pal Sam. And we do get to hear Watts-as-Ellie rehearse Bronx-bimbo lines like, "Yeah, I sucked his cock!" while frantically stripping off one outfit for the next while in her car in L.A. traffic and on the cellular. But that's all table scraps.

Continue reading: Ellie Parker Review

Mulholland Drive Review


Good
[In the spirit of competition, we present a rare filmcritic.com double review on David Lynch's sure-to-be-controversial Mulholland Drive as well as a feature discussion about the film. For additional, alternate looks at films, check out our feature "Respectfully, Yours." -Ed.]

Christopher Null, not overly impressed

Continue reading: Mulholland Drive Review

Twisted Review


Bad

Ashley Judd seems to go out of her way to find hole-riddled women-in-peril B-thrillers anymore. It's as if she's doing everything in her power not to be taken seriously as an actress.

After a moving, understated debut in 1993's "Ruby in Paradise," the actress seemed on her way toward award-worthy respect with memorable, compelling small-role performances in "Smoke," "Heat," and "A Time to Kill." Then she threw it all away to become queen of the trashy victim-empowerment genre with "Kiss the Girls," "Double Jeopardy," and "High Crimes," all of which seem promising at first but become tangled beyond salvation in their own ridiculous plot twists.

And thus we come to the appropriately titled murder mystery "Twisted," in which the twists are not only ridiculous, but also so poorly conceived that "the real killer" might as well be walking around in blood-soaked shoes.

Continue reading: Twisted Review

Mulholland Drive Review


Good

I have only one complaint about the latest of David Lynch's B-movie noir flicks for cinema intellectuals, but it's a big one.

The first 90 minutes of "Mulholland Drive" give no hint where the story might be headed. Instead of sticking with his primary story -- about a pretty, fresh-off-the-bus actress getting mixed up in a dark, esoteric phantasm of a Hollywood mystery -- Lynch drags his feet by running several tangential subplots up the flagpole, then leaving them flapping in the wind.

The argument could be made that these episodes are for atmosphere. One dead-end thread unfolds in the ominous offices of a movie production company, where a cryptic, crippled, mobster midget (good ol' David Lynch!) manipulates the lives of susceptible industry denizens from inside a dark, velvet-flocked room. Another follows a cocky, arrogant young director (Justin Theroux) who is being forced by the midget's men to cast a particular blonde starlet in his next film. He crosses paths with our heroine, but only in a superficial way.

Continue reading: Mulholland Drive Review

National Treasure Review


Bad

Let's skip right over the fact that "National Treasure" may well have the most asinine plot in the history of cinema. But for the record, it's an action-adventure yarn from "dumb it down and blow things up" producer Jerry Bruckheimer, and it's about an invisible map on the back of the Declaration of Independence leading to a vast, multi-billion-dollar treasure buried by the Founding Fathers. So I think the "you've got to be kidding" factor pretty much speaks for itself.

Instead let's marvel at how a trio of hack writers (collectively responsible for "Snow Dogs," "The 6th Day" and "I-Spy"), coupled with a director whose best work is mediocre and pedestrian (Jon Turteltaub of "Phenomenon" and "Instinct"), can take this dumb idea and make it even worse in every conceivable way.

First they contrived to have a series of barely coherent clues to the treasure's location appear in laughably cryptic little poems and in the design of the $1 and $100 bills. Then they concocted an eccentric, nerdy-cool, disgraced-historian lead character named Benjamin Franklin Gates, who arbitrarily solves each esoteric riddle within three minutes of discovering it. These lead him closer and closer to digging up the treasure -- even though he says all he wants to do is protect it. (If it's been safely hidden for centuries, why not leave well enough alone?)

Continue reading: National Treasure Review

Mark Pellegrino

Mark Pellegrino Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Mark Pellegrino Movies

We Gotta Get Out Of This Place Trailer

We Gotta Get Out Of This Place Trailer

Billy Joe is a Texan teen who earns his living on a cotton farm. It's...

Caffeine Movie Review

Caffeine Movie Review

Something's always brewing at the Black Cat Café, or so they say. The advertisers behind...

The Number 23 Movie Review

The Number 23 Movie Review

There are at least 23 ways in which The Number 23 sucks. The most important...

Capote Trailer

Capote Trailer

In November, 1959, Truman Capote (Philip Seymour Hoffman), the author of Breakfast at Tiffany's and...

Mulholland Drive Movie Review

Mulholland Drive Movie Review

[In the spirit of competition, we present a rare filmcritic.com double review on David Lynch's...

Twisted Movie Review

Twisted Movie Review

Ashley Judd seems to go out of her way to find hole-riddled women-in-peril B-thrillers anymore....

Mulholland Drive Movie Review

Mulholland Drive Movie Review

I have only one complaint about the latest of David Lynch's B-movie noir flicks for...

National Treasure Movie Review

National Treasure Movie Review

Let's skip right over the fact that "National Treasure" may well have the most asinine...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.