Mark Mckinney

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Nichole Bloom, Mark McKinney, Nico Santos, Colton Dunn , Lauren Ash - Celebrities attend 2016 NBCUniversal Press Tour at The Langham Huntington Hotel & Spa. at Langham Huntington Hotel & Spa - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 13th January 2016

Nichole Bloom, Mark Mckinney, Nico Santos, Colton Dunn and Lauren Ash
Nichole Bloom, Mark Mckinney, Nico Santos, Colton Dunn and Lauren Ash
Nichole Bloom, Mark Mckinney, Nico Santos, Colton Dunn and Lauren Ash
Nichole Bloom, Mark Mckinney, Nico Santos, Colton Dunn and Lauren Ash
Mark Mckinney
Mark Mckinney

Mark McKinney - NBC Universal Comedy Press Junket for Telenovela and Superstore - Arrivals at Universal Studios - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 18th November 2015

Mark Mckinney
Mark Mckinney
Nico Santos, America Ferrera, Lauren Ash, Colton Dunn, Nichole Bloom, Ben Feldman and Mark Mckinney

Spice World Review


OK

Why don't more non-acting bands star in fiction films as themselves? I'm serious: I would love to see Oasis in an action movie (fighting each other, natch), or a Rilo Kiley love story [Jenny Lewis has dozens of acting credits, Jesse! - Ed.], or Radiohead with a special effects budget. I'd even take a chance on a Led Zeppelin Lord of the Rings knockoff, no matter how many elves were harmed in the making of it. And isn't A Hard Day's Night (or even Help!) more fun than a dozen musical biopics?

Continue reading: Spice World Review

The Out-of-Towners (1999) Review


OK
While this remake of the 1970 Jack Lemmon film of the same name (not a classic, by the way) comes off as something of a perverse cross between Steve Martin's own Planes, Trains, and Automobiles and Adventures in Babysitting, it has enough silly giggles in it to make it better than, say, watching UPN on a Wednesday night. And though Goldie Hawn is seen in what might be the worst role in her entire life, Martin's schtick is somehow timeless and tireless.

Kids In The Hall: Same Guys, New Dresses Review


Good
I'm an old Kids in the Hall fan from way back, but this collection of behind-the-scenes vignettes from the comedy troupe's 1999-2000 live tour is hit-and-miss, which is pretty much the same thing I thought about their 1996 non-documentary movie Brian Candy.

Some of the on-stage moments are priceless (during "Jesus 2000": "So what if my ass gets itchy and I'm too busy to worship!?") as are some of the off-stage bits (Scott Thompson's attempt to get his Sony Aibo to go to sleep "because he has this responsibility"). But are you interested in the street preachers or singing beggars outside the show? Are you interested in five minutes about why their equipment is delayed at one show? Do you care whether the guys decide to take a bus from city to city instead of a plane? They sure do talk about it for a long time...

Continue reading: Kids In The Hall: Same Guys, New Dresses Review

The Saddest Music In The World Review


Excellent
The Saddest Music in the World starts off in the style of a dream, with impressionistic sets that are obviously stage props, grainy, low resolution black and white images obscured even further by fog or filtration, and stylized dialogue that seems more representational than real. But, about the time you expect the dreamer to awake and the film quality to revert to a slick 35mm normality, it doesn't. If this is a dream, or a vision, or the manifestation of a mind driven by mad storytelling technique, it's all part of the concept.

All of which seems to further 2003 as the year of the outlandish fantasy. As Sylvain Chomet's singular vision brought us a work derived purely from an irrepressibly inventive mind with The Triplets of Belleville, here Canadian director Guy Maddin (Dracula: Pages from a Virgin's Diary, Fleshpots of Antiquity) works from a co-authored original screenplay with Kazuo Ishiguro (The Remains of the Day) in a manner that combines the storytelling and musical vitality of Topsy-Turvy with the visual imagery out of the German expressionism of F.W. Murnau (Nosferatu, The Phantom) but with its own richness of character. I call it "high concept 8mm."

Continue reading: The Saddest Music In The World Review

Dog Park Review


Bad
It is rare that a great actress (Garofalo) will make two really bad movies, back to back. It is even rarer that those two movies will premiere on the same day. And what are the odds that those two films will star brothers (eg. Luke Wilson in this movie and Owen Wilson in The Minus Man)?

According to my astrologer/numerologist, it's an 18 billion to one shot.

Continue reading: Dog Park Review

Kids In The Hall: Brain Candy Review


Good
Well, what have we here? Let me say first-off that I'm a huge Kids in the Hall fan. This review is necessarily going to be tainted by the fact that I've probably seen 300 hours of Kids in the Hall on TV...and by my impression going into the film that, hey, another 1 1/2 hours wouldn't kill me.

If you aren't familiar with the comedy troupe, the Kids are five guys (Bruce McCulloch, Kevin McDonald, Mark McKinney, Scott Thompson, and Dave Foley) who have appeared in 110 episodes of some of the funniest sketch comedy television has offered up in recent years. After ending the series in July 1994, talk of a movie immediately began. Two years later, the end result is here.

Continue reading: Kids In The Hall: Brain Candy Review

Dog Park Review


Weak

Melancholy and spiritless, the dreary romantic comedy "Dog Park" plays like it was written by a depressed guy in the wake being dumped.

That guy would be former "Kids In the Hall" cast member Bruce McCulloch, who also makes his wildly unpolished directorial debut with this borderline depressing yarn about rebound romance.

The picture stars sad-eyed, generic nice guy Luke Wilson ("Home Fries") as Andy, a downtrodden recent dumpee whose ex (Kathleen Robertson) broke his heart and took his dog. Now he goes to the park without a four-legged companion and wallows in self-pity.

Continue reading: Dog Park Review

THE SADDEST MUSIC IN THE WORLD Review


Excellent

Canadian filmmaker Guy Maddin is often compared to David Lynch. In reality, his influences hail from decades long gone: from the silent-era Germans and the early Hollywood pioneers. His exuberant, expressionistic 2000 short film "The Heart of the World," made for the Toronto Film Festival, was rightly hailed as a mini-masterwork, and now here he is with a new feature film that captures some of that magic once again.

"The Saddest Music in the World" takes place in 1933 Winnipeg. A wealthy beer baroness, Lady Port-Huntly (Isabella Rossellini) is the only one making a decent living; everyone wants to drink their sorrows away. To boost business she announces a contest to determine the saddest music in the world. Each of the world's countries may enter once, and so an estranged father and two sons from far corners of the globe reunite for the contest.

The father, Fyodor (David Fox), represents Canada, the happy-go-lucky Broadway producer Chester Kent (Mark McKinney) represents America and Roderick (Ross McMillan) represents Serbia. The woeful Roderick is a world-renowned cellist who mourns his dead child and his lost wife, Narcissa (Maria de Medeiros), who is now dating Chester. Chester champions the vulgar side of America, the urge to make everything big and bright with little regard for anyone else's feelings.

Continue reading: THE SADDEST MUSIC IN THE WORLD Review

The Ladies Man Review


OK

It's been eight years since a "Saturday Night Live" skit spawned a feature film that wasn't an outright embarrassment -- but while "Ladies Man," the latest of the bunch, is no "Wayne's World," it has more and better laughs than "Superstar," "A Night at the Roxybury" and "Coneheads" combined.

True, that's not a ringing endorsement. In fact, this slight and uneven flick isn't the kind of thing you want to drop $8 on at the multiplex. It's more an inspiration rental, so now that it's on video, I say go for it.

While the script is of the construction paper and Elmer's Glue variety, Tim Meadows does a bang-up job of turning his out-of-touch mack daddy character from a one-joke sketch premise into a likable goofball lothario who is entertaining for the better part of the movie's 87 minutes.

Continue reading: The Ladies Man Review

Superstar Review


Weak

The most palatable entry since "Wayne's World" in the seemingly unstoppable onslaught of "Saturday Night Live" sketches turned into feature films, "Superstar" is genuinely funny, for a change.

This time the beaten-to-death, three-minute bit stretched to movie length is about "SNL"-er Molly Shannon's terminally dorky catholic school girl Mary Katherine Gallagher, who is desperate for her first kiss and determined to break into showbiz through performing in the campus "Stamp Out Venereal Disease" talent show.

Dumb? Naturally. But director Bruce McCulloch ("Dog Park") -- an alumnus of the Canadian sketch show "Kids In the Hall" -- gives "Superstar" a different comedic sensibility than "A Night at the Roxbury," "Coneheads," and the rest of the "SNL" big screen tripe.

Continue reading: Superstar Review

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Mark McKinney Movies

The Saddest Music in the World Movie Review

The Saddest Music in the World Movie Review

The Saddest Music in the World starts off in the style of a dream, with...

Dog Park Movie Review

Dog Park Movie Review

It is rare that a great actress (Garofalo) will make two really bad movies, back...

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Kids in the Hall: Brain Candy Movie Review

Kids in the Hall: Brain Candy Movie Review

Well, what have we here? Let me say first-off that I'm a huge Kids...

Dog Park Movie Review

Dog Park Movie Review

Melancholy and spiritless, the dreary romantic comedy "Dog Park" plays like it was written by...

THE SADDEST MUSIC IN THE WORLD Movie Review

THE SADDEST MUSIC IN THE WORLD Movie Review

Canadian filmmaker Guy Maddin is often compared to David Lynch. In reality, his influences hail...

The Ladies Man Movie Review

The Ladies Man Movie Review

It's been eight years since a "Saturday Night Live" skit spawned a feature film that...

Superstar Movie Review

Superstar Movie Review

The most palatable entry since "Wayne's World" in the seemingly unstoppable onslaught of "Saturday Night...

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