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Shaun The Sheep Movie 2015

Richard Stark , Mark Burton - Shaun The Sheep Movie 2015 at Regency Village Theatre - Westwood, California, United States - Saturday 1st August 2015

Richard Stark and Mark Burton
Richard Stark and Mark Burton

Shaun The Sheep Movie Review


Even without a single word of spoken dialogue, this film has more charm and energy than most Hollywood blockbusters. But then the voice cast supplies all manner of moans, chuckles, grunts and sighs to let us know what the characters are thinking. And it's great to see this beloved TV character, spun-off from one of Aardman Animation's Wallace & Gromit shorts, back on the big screen where he belongs.

It opens on the rural farm where Shaun (vocalised by Justin Fletcher) is getting tired of the daily routine with his flock, their scatterbrained Farmer and sly sheepdog Blitzer (both voiced by John Sparkes). So one morning Shaun gets the idea to take a day off, plotting a sheepish revolution that goes wildly wrong when the Farmer ends up with amnesia wandering the streets of the nearby Big City. So now the sheep and Blitzer need to stage an elaborate rescue, all while staying out of the clutches of tenacious animal control officer Trumper (Omid Djalili). And as the Farmer has his own hair-raising adventure, his animals need to team up with an ugly stray puppy (Tim Hands) to save the day.

It's amazing how much personality each of these characters has, with noises perfectly complimenting the expressive animation. Since it's actually shot with clay and wool models, everything has a hand-made look that makes the film feel like it's set in the real world, rather than some digitally-rendered fantasy. And Shaun is a terrific hero, a hilariously strong-willed sheep who is fiercely loyal to his flock and always has an idea to get them out of the next mess. Each of the film's set-pieces is impeccably staged, packed with witty touches that will keep the adults chuckling at things the kids won't see until they watch it again. And again.

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Shaun The Sheep - Extended Trailer

Shaun the Sheep and the rest of the flock are up to their old tricks again, pulling yet more pranks on their Farmer boss and his sheepdog Bitzer. However, unsurprisingly, one day a trick goes badly wrong the Farmer's caravan winds up sailing down the road towards the Big City. The ovine menaces have to get him back and decide to get a bus to town with the intention of handing out Missing posters. With human disguises, they try and blend into city life, but of course, Shaun and Bitzer - not being the most streetwise of animals - are soon rounded up by an inner city animal control team. With their owner locked up in a rogue caravan, they have to rely on the rest of the flock to save them before it's too late.

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Shaun The Sheep Trailer

The mischievous Shaun the Sheep has moved on from his television roots in his farm field, to a big city on the big screen. When Shaun decides he wants to take a day off to get away from the other sheep he is continuously in charge of, he decides to visit the city. When the flock become engaged in a mix-up involving a caravan, their farmer and a very steep hill, the group are trapped in the city and must find their way out, navigating obstacles like traffic, animal rescue activists and a cat that bears a striking resemblance to Dr. Hannibal Lector. 

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Shaun The Sheep - Teaser Trailer

Shaun the Sheep may be the smallest in his flock, but he's certainly the brightest - though not exactly the best behaved ovine in the countryside. Sometimes his mischievous ways go a little too far and he, the rest of the flock and his sheepdog pal Bitzer are in for quite the adventure when one of his exploits gets completely out of hand (as per usual) and their farmer is forced to leave the farm for the bright lights of the city. While it may be fun on a normal day to prank their human boss, Shaun realises that he and the flock in fact desperately need him back to take care of them and so Shaun sets out to find out where he is, rescue him and bring everyone back to their green hillside home.

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Gnomeo & Juliet Review

With its Toy Story meets Shrek approach, this animated romp feels somewhat derivative. It's all snarky dialog and whizzy action. But it's also silly enough to keep both adults and children chuckling.

Gnomeo (voiced by McAvoy), son of Lady Bluebury (Smith), is the leader of the blue Montague garden. Accompanied by his sidekick Benny (Lucas), Gnomeo engages in tit-for-tat warfare with the red Capulets next door. Then he meets Juliet (Blunt), daughter of Lord Redbrick (Caine), and it's love at first sight. Which sends red warrior Tybalt (Statham) into a rage. As they plot a secret life together, Gnomeo and Juliet are assisted by Juliet's frog friend Nanette (Jensen) and the garden flamingo Featherstone (Cummings). But can these star-crossed lovers find happiness?

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Aliens In The Attic Review

High energy levels and some genuinely hilarious set pieces make this kids' alien-invasion romp a lot more fun than expected. It's not, erm, rocket science, but it's a thoroughly entertaining ride from start to finish.Tom (Jenkins) is a surly teen who's a lot smarter than his grades indicate. But his parents (Nealon and Vigman) plan to whip him into shape with a family fishing holiday with sisters Bethany and Hannah (Tisdale and Boettcher) plus cousins (Butler, Young and Young), a goofy uncle (Richter), sassy Nana (Roberts) and Bethany's smarmy too-old boyfriend (Hoffman). At the isolated lake house, the kids discover that they're under siege from pint-sized aliens.

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Beautiful Ohio Review

It's virtually impossible to watch Beautiful Ohio without films like The Ice Storm and The Squid and the Whale unspooling in your mind at the same time. That's not a criticism; it's a tip of the hat to first-time director (and actor and brother of Rob, and ex-husband of Hilary Swank) Chad Lowe, who takes an intelligent Ethan Canin script about a troubled family and gives it just enough early-'70s period piece touches to make it the equal of the aforementioned earlier films.

The Messerman family of suburban Ohio, circa 1973, is a little bit weird. Dad Simon (William Hurt) is a frustrated intellectual who earns a living as an insurance salesman but fancies himself as a great mind and is prone to speaking in brilliant quotations from geniuses of the past. His wife Judith (Rita Wilson) is just as enamored of her own intellect and has a deep love of classical music. Their older son Clive (David Call) is a supersmart math geek/long-haired hippie who breezes through statewide math competitions without even giving a damn. He's more into sparking up bongs in his bedroom with his luscious girlfriend Sandra (Michelle Trachtenberg) and his best friend Elliot (Hale Appleman), with whom he shares a secret language. Somewhat lost in the shuffle is the younger teenage son, William (Brett Davern), who is both amused and put off by his family's eccentric behavior.

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Madagascar Review

It's a testament to how great animated filmmaking has become that Madagascar is just a pretty good movie. If it had been released in 1995, audiences would have been stunned at the animation, the storyline, and the fun celebrity voices. Now, it's been-there-done-that and, "Oh, when is Shrek 3 coming out?" and consistent, legitimate Oscar talk for Pixar.

Of course, there are worst ways to spend your Memorial Day weekend than to share in the adventures of four wild animals at the Central Park Zoo. The zoo's star, Alex (voiced by Ben Stiller), is a headlining lion who loves being the limelight. His best friend, Marty (Chris Rock), a zebra, yearns to go beyond the zoo's walls and return to the wild. At the duo's side is boisterous, level-headed hippo, Gloria (Jada Pinkett Smith) and hypochondriac giraffe Melman (David Schwimmer).

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Wallace & Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit Review

There are roughly 255 solid laughs in the full-length animated feature Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit. Not that I counted each one, but the movie runs 85 minutes and feels like it crams at least three great gags into every 60-second span. You'll need observant eyes, or multiple viewings, to catch each witty aside weaved through the assorted scenes.

We've come to expect nothing less from Nick Park and his beloved claymation heroes. The innovative animator enjoys a near-perfect Academy Award batting average - three Oscars and four nominations, though in 1991 he was nominated twice in the same category and therefore could only take home one trophy.

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