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Marisa Tomei - Marisa Tomei departs from Los Angeles Internatinoal Airport (LAX) - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 14th November 2014

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Marisa Tomei - It's Only A Play Opening Night - Arrivals at Gerald Shoenfeld Theater - New York, New York, United States - Thursday 9th October 2014

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Marisa Tomei - The HBO Films New York premiere of The Normal Heart at the Ziegfeld Theatre - Arrivals. - New York, New York, United States - Tuesday 13th May 2014

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Marisa Tomei - 2014 Tribeca Film Festival - "Loitering With Intent" Premiere -Red Carpet Arrivals - Manhattan, New York, United States - Saturday 19th April 2014

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Marisa Tomei and Sam Rockwell
Brian Geraghty, Isabelle Mcnally, Adam Rapp, Ivan Martin, Marisa Tomei, Sam Rockwell and Michael Godere
Ivan Martin, Sam Rockwell, Marisa Tomei and Michael Godere

Marisa Tomei, Ivan Martin, writer Michael Godere, Adam Rapp, Isabelle McNally, Bryan Geraphty and Sam Rockwell - 'Loitering With Intent' premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival - Arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Friday 18th April 2014

Marisa Tomei, Ivan Martin, Writer Michael Godere, Adam Rapp, Isabelle Mcnally, Bryan Geraphty and Sam Rockwell
Marisa Tomei, Ivan Martin, Writer Michael Godere, Adam Rapp, Isabelle Mcnally, Bryan Geraphty and Sam Rockwell
Marisa Tomei, Ivan Martin, Writer Michael Godere, Adam Rapp, Isabelle Mcnally, Bryan Geraphty and Sam Rockwell
Marisa Tomei, Ivan Martin, Writer Michael Godere, Adam Rapp, Isabelle Mcnally, Bryan Geraphty and Sam Rockwell
Marisa Tomei, Ivan Martin, Writer Michael Godere, Adam Rapp, Isabelle Mcnally, Bryan Geraphty and Sam Rockwell

Marisa Tomei - The funeral of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman held at Church of St. Ignatius Loyola in Manhattan. Hoffman was found dead in his West Village apartment on Sunday (02Jan14) from an apparent drug overdose. - Manhattan, New York, United States - Friday 7th February 2014

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Marisa Tomei - Diane Von Furstenberg's Journey of A Dress exhibition opening celebration at May Company Building at LACMA West - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 10th January 2014

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Marisa Tomei - Diane von Furstenberg's 'Journey Of A Dress' 40th Anniversary Party at Wilshire May Company Building - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 10th January 2014

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Marisa Tomei - Variety's Creative Impact Awards And 10 Directors to Watch Brunch, at the Parker Palm Springs as part of the Palm Springs International Film Festival - Palm Springs, California, United States - Sunday 5th January 2014

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Marisa Tomei - 23rd Annual Environmental Media Awards Presented By Toyota And Lexus Held at Warner Bros. Studios - Burbank, California, United States - Saturday 19th October 2013

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Marisa Tomei - Celebrities on a night out at Hemingway's Lounge in Hollywood - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Monday 19th August 2013

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Marisa Tomei

Marisa Tomei - Persol Magnificent Obsessions: 30 Stories of Craftsmanship on Film held at the Museum of Moving Image- Arrivals - New York City, NY, United States - Thursday 11th July 2013

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Marisa Tomei - Sony Pictures Classics presents the premiere of 'At Any Price' at the Landmark Sunshine Cinema- Outside Arrivals - New York City, New York , United States - Friday 19th April 2013

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Marisa Tomei - World premiere of 'The Flick' at Playwrights Horizons' Mainstage Theater-Arrivals - New York City, New York , United States - Tuesday 12th March 2013

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Marisa Tomei - QVC Red Carpet Style at Four Seasons Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Friday 22nd February 2013

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Marisa Tomei - BVLGARI Jewelry at BVLGARI Rodeo Drive Store - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 19th February 2013

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Marisa Tomei Wednesday 24th October 2012 The British Fashion Council Cocktail Party to Celebrate London show Rooms LA held at the Skybar

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Marisa Tomei and New York Fashion Week Wednesday 12th September 2012 Mercedes-Benz New York Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2013 - Outside

Marisa Tomei and New York Fashion Week
Marisa Tomei and New York Fashion Week

Marisa Tomei Tuesday 13th March 2012 leaving Yoga class in West Hollywood

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Marisa Tomei and Liz Goldwyn - Marisa Tomei and Liz Goldwyn Monday 12th March 2012 British Fashion Council's LONDON Show ROOMS LA Opening Cocktail Party at Smashbox

Marisa Tomei and Liz Goldwyn
Marisa Tomei and Liz Goldwyn
Marisa Tomei and Liz Goldwyn
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Marisa Tomei Wednesday 5th October 2011 New York premiere of 'The Ides of March' at the Ziegfeld Theater - Arrivals New York City, USA

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Marisa Tomei Friday 9th September 2011 36th Annual Toronto International Film Festival - 'Ides Of March' - Premiere held at The Roy Thomson Hall. Toronto, Canada

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Marisa Tomei - Wednesday 31st August 2011 at Venice Film Festival Venice, Italy

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Evan Rachel Wood, George Clooney, Grant Heslov, Marisa Tomei, Paul Giamatti and Philip Seymour Hoffman
Evan Rachel Wood, George Clooney, Grant Heslov, Marisa Tomei, Paul Giamatti and Philip Seymour Hoffman

Evan Rachel Wood, George Clooney and Marisa Tomei - Evan Rachel Wood, George Clooney and Marisa Tomei Wednesday 31st August 2011 at Venice Film Festival Venice, Italy

Evan Rachel Wood, George Clooney and Marisa Tomei
Grant Heslov, Evan Rachel Wood, George Clooney, Marisa Tomei, Paul Giamatti and Philip Seymour Hoffman
Evan Rachel Wood and Marisa Tomei
Evan Rachel Wood and George Clooney

Marisa Tomei Tuesday 19th July 2011 World premiere of 'Crazy, Stupid, Love' held at the Ziegfeld Theater - Arrivals New York City, USA

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Before The Devil Knows You're Dead Review


Excellent
At the tender age of 83, director Sidney Lumet opens his latest film with a married couple going at it, doggy-style, in a bedroom full of mirrors. The wife is black-haired and thin while the husband is bulky and stares at the reflection as if it's his only moment of true triumph. In a recent interview, Lumet described the image as the man's idea of "classy"; an act of high-class privilege that the man can only hope to aspire to.

The man in question is Andy (Philip Seymour Hoffman), a pudgy volcano of a corporate hustler with a trophy wife. Gina (Marisa Tomei) fits that role to a T as she spends Andy's money and enjoys mid-day quickies with Andy's brother Hank (Ethan Hawke). Hank's money goes towards his ex-wife (a great Amy Ryan) and daughter while Andy's cash, when not with Gina, is spent on heroin in the très chic twentieth-floor apartment of his dealer in Manhattan. The boys need dough and their bourgeois office jobs aren't keeping it coming in. That's when Andy gets the idea.

Continue reading: Before The Devil Knows You're Dead Review

Rescue Me: Season Three Review


Weak
In the first couple of seasons, Denis Leary's FDNY fire opera Rescue Me flung itself through windows and played out in traffic. It busted jaws, opened old wounds just for spite and made grand sport of the whole ungodly train wreck of it all. It was almost as though co-creators Leary and Peter Tolan (The Larry Sanders Show) felt they were going to get canceled any second and so chucked all caution to the wind. In between sitting around the firehouse and indulging in some of the more profane dialogue ever to grace the TV screen (even on basic cable), the characters were subjected to just about any disaster Leary and Tolan could come up with, anything to push these emotionally stunted mugs to the wall and see what devastation they would mete out in response.

But somehow, the pissy little export from the land of the five boroughs -- and rarely has a show so viscerally captured the city's day-to-day, boiling-over, rat-in-a-cage anger -- survived. And this is after sending the wife of the Chief (Jack McGee) into a debilitating Alzheimer's nightmare and not only devastating Tommy Gavin's (Leary) family with the long-term and low-intensity emotional warfare of a never-ending divorce but then, near the end of the second season, having a drunk driver kill Tommy's little boy. That tragedy was then capped off by a nothing-to-lose Uncle Teddy (Lenny Clarke) gunning down the driver in full view of the cops, since a life behind bars seemed preferable to anything else he had going.

Continue reading: Rescue Me: Season Three Review

Wild Hogs Review


Good
Prior to my screening of Wild Hogs, the theatre played an advertisement in which two identical cars "sumo fight" on an elevated circular stage. Each car is distinguished by its performance. One charges forth, its engines roaring healthily, its nose forcing the other back. This other, its engine squealing pathetically, submits to the force of its opponent until eventually plummeting from the edge of the stage. The difference between the two cars? The first was running on superior fuel.

This car reminds me of Wild Hogs. Ostensibly, Wild Hogs is the same model as every other middle-of-the-road road movie; a hybrid vehicle that mishmashes middle-age crisis comedy with fish-out-of-water, city-slicker slapstick. However, its charismatic and effortless cast, and the occasional bit of wit, see that it performs better than the usual Hollywood dross regularly offered up as comedy. Hence its box office success.

Continue reading: Wild Hogs Review

Loverboy Review


Bad
Much like Robert Towne's recent adaptation of Ask the Dust, Kevin Bacon's Loverboy is a labor of love. Sometime in 2003, Kyra Sedgwick (Bacon's spouse) handed him a copy of Victoria Redel's novel, Loverboy, and both found themselves eager to bring the story to the screen. And similar to Towne's effort, Bacon is so enthusiastic about the material that he can't get his concentration correct.

Emily Stoll (Sedgwick) is in her late 20s and roaming the Midwest and just about everywhere else for the right ejaculate. After a miscarriage from a "no father," multi-partner pregnancy, she meets Paul (Campbell Scott) and in one night of passion, a child is conceived. The son, Paul aka Loverboy (Dominic Scott Kay), quickly becomes Emily's entire life, trying to make life a magical, ongoing discovery. Emily has nightmarish flashbacks of her lovebird parents (Bacon and Marisa Tomei) who were too busy being in love to take care of a child properly, and she daydreams of her fantasy mother, Mrs. Harker (Sandra Bullock). Loverboy eventually becomes wise to his mother's obsessive grasp on him and begins to revolt, especially when she tries to seduce Mark (Matt Dillon), a father figure. This, of course, can't end well.

Continue reading: Loverboy Review

Danika Review


OK
Danika Merrick (Marisa Tomei) is a young suburban mother with a large family and an over-active imagination. When the brutal armed robbery of the bank in which she works winds up being nothing more than a really vivid hallucination, Danika decides to stay home and spend more time with the family -- much to her teenaged children's consternation. More hallucinations follow -- a missing and murdered girl, a terrorist attack on a school bus, a severed head in the fridge - and with each fresh jolt of psychosis, Danika's world gets smaller and less grounded in reality. She keeps a close eye on her kids and becomes obsessed with their budding sexuality. Danika worries about the faithfulness of her husband and the age of her psychiatrist. Pills follow. Nerves jangle. While everyone around her -- including the cops -- is convinced Danika's off her rocker, some of the hallucinations start coming true. Perhaps these aren't mere illusions but premonitions?

Danika is something of a puzzle film. Nearly every sequence contains some hint at the outcome. Some whisper towards the future. At times the approach is engaging, others just irritating. Scripter Joshua Leibner hopes to generate confusion and at the same time lend an almost reverential power to the onscreen happenings. It's like asking, "where is the line between psychosis and divination?" Thankfully the film moves towards a more satisfying conclusion than freshman year philosophy banter. Well, somewhat more satisfying: Every telegraphed shock and twist in Danika has been done before. It doesn't feel old, necessarily, just too familiar. Too comfortable.

Continue reading: Danika Review

Just A Kiss Review


Weak
It looks like actor Fisher Stevens discovered rotoscoping in 2002, and figured a little post-production trickery (used at random and only on certain characters at certain times throughout the film) would distract people enough into looking past the general unwatchability of this black comedy/romance that wastes just about everything it has going for it. A few funny set pieces and some impressive actors (Tomei, Eldard, Dinklage, Sedgwick) all turn up to be for naught. Stevens would rather show off his budget animation technique and tell a silly "turn back the clock" story that is alternately nonsensical and trite.

Factotum Review


Very Good
While Bent Hamer's Factotum isn't equal to the source material, it's a must-see for all of us fascinated by Charles Bukowski, by his persona as much as his words. Adapted from the namesake novel by Hamer and Jim Stark, Factotum's central character is Henry Chinaski, Bukowski's fictional alter ego who, like its author, is a shambling, hard-drinking writer, slumming away at odd jobs, quartering in hole-in-the-wall apartments, while he scrawls away at poems and stories every chance he gets.To watch Matt Dillon personify Chinaski/Bukowski is thrilling: At least from outward appearance, the actor has nailed the role, and, at times, he seems to be channeling Bukowski from the grave. It's an eerie simulacrum: Dillon skulks about the screen, slouch-shouldered, sporting a scruffy beard, a mane of combed-back hair, wearing the short-sleeves and slacks that was Bukowski's standard wardrobe, regarding the world with hangdog eyes and a jaw jutting outward in a subtle show of defiance.Equally arresting is the always-fantastic Lili Taylor, playing Chinaski's on-again, off-again girlfriend, Jan. She's his kindred spirit, which means the two get along best with a jug of wine between them. As Jan, Taylor projects a mannish energy. Wearing a perpetual sneer, keeping her frayed hair and shoulders tossed back, she enters any room like she's spoiling for a fight. Jan is also fiercely possessive of Chinaski and panics whenever any windfall threatens their low-rent, booze-sodden lifestyle. She's also the only person who can push the bearish Chinaski's buttons. When they break up, their trails lead back to each other and entwine, as before, then wind apart again, exactly like twin DNA strands.Chinaski's search for work and his rocky relationship with Jan form Factotum's nominal narrative thread. No sooner does Chinaski land a job that he gets bored with it or chafes under the authority of white-collar boobs, and leaves. He hates them so much -- in the same way he hates his father (as one scene implies) -- that he defies their authority in ways both direct and passive-aggressive: After one boss, finding him at a local dive instead of on the job, fires him, Chinaski calmly replies by offering him a drink. Midway through Factotum, we get a romantic interlude of sorts involving Laura (Marisa Tomei), a gold-digging floozy. Laura's got her hands in the pockets of a moneyed, European eccentric (Didier Flamand) who offers wayward women asylum in his morgue-like home. Chinaski's sojourn with Laura and her ilk takes Factotum into outer David Lynch territory, and, somehow, we're glad when Chinaski breaks free of them and returns to his sunnier, native habitat of the urban jungle.Like Post Office and Ham on Rye, Factotum is ultimately a chronicle of its author's anxious, unconquerable desire to write, to transcribe his toils, obsessions, and pains into the stuff of art. Beneath Bukowski's reticent surface, fires raged -- stoked by the man's angry, lustful, transgressive emotions. Words plucked from those fires were then hammered into shape and branded onto the page. It's that smoldering quality in the prose that missing in Stark and Hamer's handling -- the contradiction between the inner and outer dimensions of the writer. Rather than finding an expressive style that rendered the world as grotesquely as Chinaski sees it, a style to counterpoint the character's calm, composed exterior, the material settles for a safe, neutered approach. This Factotum is more eager and willing to put Bukowski's words in prettily composed frames. Hamer and Stark only get the outlines of Chinaski's life right -- the hand-to-mouth living and boozing in which all that spiritually sustains the writer are the hours spent hunched over his notepad with a ballpoint pen. Finally, Dillon and Taylor are the sources of Factotum's vitriol and sharpness. They seem willing to delve where Hamer's direction dare not go.Last call.

Welcome To Sarajevo Review


Weak
If Woody Harrelson is a journalist, then hell, I'm Woody Harrelson.

Continue reading: Welcome To Sarajevo Review

The Watcher Review


Bad
Keanu Reeves, get thee back to The Matrix as soon as possible.

Following one of the most pitiful title sequences I've ever seen, The Watcher actually proceeds to become one of the most pitiful thrillers I've ever seen. And that takes some doing... but let me tell you how.

Continue reading: The Watcher Review

The Perez Family Review


Bad
How can you have a Perez family without Rosie? Put aside the fact that Tomei and Huston are decidedly not Cuban, I had to read a plot summary to find out this was supposed to be a comedy. Oh really, now? This story, adapted from a novel, picks up the fragments of at least four Perezes, Cuban refugees who find themselves inventing a "family" to better gain political asylum. The plot centers around Molina's search for long-list (real) wife Huston, only he falls in love with slut Tomei, while Huston falls for cop Palminteri. Poor Trini Alvarado is wasted as Huston's wide-eyed sidekick. Everyone else is wasted on a hopelessly dull story which positively puts you to sleep.

Slums Of Beverly Hills Review


Excellent
Tamara Jenkins hits gold with this first effort, a funny portrayal of teen angst on the fringes of 1976 Beverly Hills. Natasha Lyonne is stellar as Vivian Abramowitz, a freshman coming to grips with her voluptuous body, nutty siblings, and deadbeat dad. Marisa Tomei is almost as good as Vivian's drug-rehab escapee cousin, who throws the Abramowitz family for a loop - but becomes their saving grace thanks to her wealthy father, who funds their existence "while she's clean." Which, of course, doesn't last long. A funny and light comedy, great for a rental.

Continue reading: Slums Of Beverly Hills Review

Four Rooms Review


Weak
I wish I could say I was let down by Four Rooms, but given the sheer volume of just awful buzz about the film, I think I got what I was expecting: an over-anticipated, overworked movie that was full of talent but devoid of taste.

It starts off bad enough. As the credits announce the four writer/directors (Allison Anders, Alexandre Rockwell, Robert Rodriguez, and Quentin Tarantino), a cartoon sequence plays over them, in the tradition of cinematic masterpieces like Mannequin. This sets the stage: New Year's Eve at Hollywood's Mon Signor Hotel and only one bellhop (Tim Roth), and believe me, it's a rillyrilly wacky place. The film then launches into the first of four 30ish-minute shorts, one by each director.

Continue reading: Four Rooms Review

The Guru Review


Very Good
Heather Graham was meant for adult films. Gorgeous, sleek, and undeniably sexy, she can't act a lick but belongs scantily clad and in front of the camera. Donning skates and Daisy Dukes, she could convincingly take on any man off the streets as Rollergirl in Boogie Nights. This time around, in The Guru, directed by Daisy von Scherler Mayer (Party Girl), her porn star character instructs us on how to make passionate love to the rhythm of none other than Billy Joel, as her methods of dealing with the mental challenges of porn become sexual healing for a deprived nation.

The messenger of the porn star's wisdom is Ramu Gupta (Jimi Mistry), a dance instructor from Delhi, who longs to "live the American dream." He's in for a rude awakening upon arriving in the states, but his resolve "never to work for a salary" pushes him to audition to be a star - even if it's in porn. To his dismay, with all the folks holding coffee and shining bright lights, he can't seem to get it up, not even for Heather Graham posing as a love-starved Senator willing to bang any savage on her environmentally protected beach.

Continue reading: The Guru Review

The Wild Thornberrys Movie Review


Excellent
Considering that I have not watched a Nickelodeon show since Double Dare, I didn't know what to expect from The Wild Thornberrys Movie, based on a popular cartoon from the network. Surprisingly, the film is a hilarious adventure and I shamelessly enjoyed it. The primary audience for this one is kids 12 and under, but directors Cathy Malkasian and Jeff McGrath really took big kids like me into consideration when they put this animated extravaganza together. It features a fantastic score composed by Paul Simon, appropriate to its sub-Saharan setting and is accompanied by a splendid new song from The Dave Matthews Band. Its progressive themes of ecological preservation and racial tolerance also add to the warm tingly nostalgic feeling of the film, but it never gets too cheesy. Let's just say that the Disneyfication of this one is kept to a minimum. It even has a PG rating.

The story follows the Thornberrys, a hodge-podge British family of three generations all living in one souped-up trailer home, as they travel throughout the world documenting nature's wonders. Our protagonist is young Eliza (Lacey Chabert), who has been given a magical gift to talk to animals. Eliza is the quintessential loner, as she is more content with her animal friends than her family's rules and constantly seeks adventure. Along with her chimpanzee companion Darwin (Tom Kane), she manages to get into trouble when she recklessly takes the baby cheetah Akela past the safe boundaries of the desert. Sure enough, malicious poachers snatch up Akela from a helicopter, and despite Eliza's heroic efforts, she's unable to save the cub. Heartbroken and facing rebuke from her bewildered parents, Eliza is shipped off to boarding in school in England. Trapped in the confines of "civilization," Eliza vows to find the lost cheetah cub and to return to her family where she rightfully belongs.

Continue reading: The Wild Thornberrys Movie Review

Alfie Review


Weak
With his insatiable appetite for the opposite sex, his cockney British chirp and his healthy confidence in his own good looks, Jude Law's modern-day Romeo romping through Alfie is a smoother-talking Austin Powers without the adolescent giggles.

How much is too much when it comes to Law? Before the female readers answer, consider this: The handsome Brit has his well-manicured hands in three current projects and will release three more films between now and year's end. Needless to say, your tolerance for Law's antics will determine how much you'll enjoy Alfie. Director Charles Shyer's mixed bag of tricks includes a continuous conversation through the imaginary fourth wall and a camera lens that's terrified to let Law wander too far out of frame.

Continue reading: Alfie Review

Someone Like You Review


Very Good
Based on the Laura Zigman novel, Animal Husbandry, Someone Like You is a romantic comedy about a late night TV talent coordinator named Jane (Ashley Judd), whose luck in love is predictably bad. So predictable is her misfortune, in fact, that she has devised a pervasive theory on the subject, revolving around the notion that men are like cattle.

When she meets her show's new executive, Ray (Kinnear, You've Got Mail), however, her luck -- she thinks -- begins to change. But Ray, she discovers, is just a typical bull, looking to spread his seed in wider pastures. And it's not until he dumps her for his ex-girlfriend that she realizes the true depth of her plight. Jane, it seems, is an old cow. And Ray is looking for a new cow. This joke more or less carries the film, and -- though interesting at first -- it gets old after its twentieth or fiftieth appearance in the script.

Continue reading: Someone Like You Review

My Cousin Vinny Review


Excellent
Marisa Tomei won one of the most controversial Oscars ever for her brash performance as Joe Pesci's dumbass lawyer girlfriend in this film, and -- her high, loud voice aside -- she's the least memorable part of the film. Rather, a genuinely funny script with dialogue perfectly delivered by Pesci ("What is a grit!?") gets tons of laughs. After all, he's a gambino wannabe lawyer trapped in a Southern small town. Michael J. Fox in the South doesn't get laughs. Pesci does. Very funny fish-out-of-water flick and, Oscar notwithstanding, generally underrated.

Anger Management Review


Good
Fresh from uncharacteristic performances in Punch-Drunk Love and About Schmidt, Adam Sandler and Jack Nicholson have returned to their roots in Anger Management. In Sandler's case, it's as the dim-bulb Everyman who sings with a falsetto; in Nicholson's, as the crazed lunatic with eyebrows of steel.

These two performers come together for the first time in a strange and uneven movie ostensibly about the dysfunction caused by repressed anger. Sandler's Dave, traumatized since the 1970s when his small package was revealed by a bully in the middle of his Brooklyn neighborhood, is an executive assistant to the president of a pet clothing company (people, I don't make this stuff up). A plane trip lands him in a seat next to Dr. Buddy Rydell (Nicholson), and a chance arm-brush with a flight attendant (you've seen the trailers) lands him in court for assault. Soon enough he's sentenced to spend a month in the care of Rydell, who moves into Dave's flat, where he demands breakfast be cooked for him and sleeps naked with him in his bed.

Continue reading: Anger Management Review

In The Bedroom Review


Excellent
In the Bedroom is an immensely powerful motion picture that presents a small New England town in its trademark tranquility... until tragedy strikes and disrupts the folksy setting. Actor-turned-director Todd Field delivers a penetrating feature (in his mainstream debut) that suggests he has a knack for helming solid, gripping heartfelt stories that are shocking and uniquely absorbing. In the Bedroom is an eloquent and sobering drama that intensifies beyond expectation. Ambitious and convincingly involving, this film is one of the most memorable offerings of the year. Well-acted and beautifully crafted, In the Bedroom is an emotionally haunting tale that provokes the senses.

The film takes place in a small Maine community called Camden. Here, it's not all that uncommon to see chipped wooden houses on every other corner or sleepy-eyed churches that feature old rusty bells hanging in the steeple. The aura of small-town life is apparent and could pass for a Norman Rockwell painting. Among this quaint town's residents are a prototypical middle-aged couple named Matt and Ruth Fowler (Tom Wilkinson and Sissy Spacek). Matt is a distinguished physician and native Mainer. New Yorker Ruth is a high school choral music teacher who enjoys her occupation. The Fowlers have one child named Frank (Nick Stahl), a college graduate student studying architecture, who has returned home for the summer while working as a lobsterman to earn some extra money.

Continue reading: In The Bedroom Review

Happy Accidents Review


Very Good
My filmcritic.com colleague Norm Schrager nailed Session 9, Brad Anderson's throwback to spooky horror films from the 70's. It worked as an eerie homage without being self-referential or smugly postmodern. Genre aficionados will acknowledge the similarities in tone to Stanley Kubrick's The Shining and George Romero's Dawn of the Dead without being taken out of the engrossing narrative (i.e., a psychologically addled waste management team clears out an abandoned lunatic asylum; unspeakable dread ensues). In a double-whammy for 2001, Anderson shoots and (mostly) scores again with his eclectic riff on time-travel episodes from The Twilight Zone, appropriately titled Happy Accidents.

Much like Session 9, the cards are played very close to the vest here. Is boyish, eccentric "Sam Deed from Dubuque, Iowa" a futuristic voyager from the year 2470 or just your run-of-the-mill psychologically disturbed nutcase let loose on the present-day streets of NYC? As played by wonderful character actor Vincent D'Onofrio (Full Metal Jacket), it's up in the air whether or not we should accept his detailed monologues about life after the polar ice caps have melted. The question proves to be moot, at least for a time. Even if the whole thing proves to be a creative delusion, one agrees with the character judgment passed down on him by his new girlfriend, Ruby (Marisa Tomei): "He's a freak, but he sure tells a good story!"

Continue reading: Happy Accidents Review

Untamed Heart Review


OK
Christian Slater got the most cartoonish scar in motion picture history in this ultra-depressing melodrama about a flighty waitress with big dreams (Marisa Tomei) who falls for a nearly mute busboy with a bum heart (Slater). Between the rape, vengeance, medical trauma, and mindfucking, Untamed Heart is probably the worst date movie ever sold as a romance. Interesting for Tomei's performance... but watch it only if you're just too damn happy.

What Women Want Review


Very Good
If you looked like Mel Gibson, being able to read women's minds wouldn't be too imperative. Just give 'em those baby blues and flash those pearly whites, and you're in, baby. Or so you'd think. In What Women Want, directed by relationship comedy veteran Nancy Meyers, Gibson's character gets the real scoop on what the fairer sex thinks about him, and boy, is he in trouble. But his problems are the viewer's fortune.

As all-star Chicago ad man Nick Marshall, Gibson is awash in the stereotypical world of a man's man. Ogling chicks, living high on the hog, and being a major player is his life. He has unending self-confidence just because he can bed babes, but ho, what he doesn't know....

Continue reading: What Women Want Review

King Of The Jungle Review


Weak
John Leguizamo attempts to take a serious turn in King of the Jungle and frankly, it's as laughable as any of his comedy work. Such a funny comic actor, Leguizamo has nothing in the way of dramatic chops, here playing -- get this -- a mentally challenged young man whose civil rights activist mother is shot and killed. The plot summary claims the film is about his search for the killer, but really the film consists of an hour of Leguizamo running around and showing off his Gilbert Grape-esque acting skills, followed by 20 minutes of this pathetic search for justice. Just awful, namely due to a horrifically bad script, he is chased through the film by New York movie regulars Rosie Perez, Michael Rapaport, Marisa Tomei, and Annabella Sciorra.

Someone Like You Review


Good

What's this? An authentically human romantic comedy without any sign of two-dimensional stereotypes, nose-crinkling cute stock sweethearts or broadly farcical emotional retards? Well, beat me with a valentine! Who'd have thunk it.

At first glance, "Someone Like You" may look like a formulaic chick flick about a pert, 30-ish career gal (Ashley Judd) who moves in with a womanizing wolf of a co-worker (Hugh Jackman) after being dumped by her boyfriend (Greg Kinnear). But the people that populate this picture are refreshingly genuine and multifaceted, with understandable motives and tangible feelings.

Sure Roy (Kinnear) dumps Jane (Judd) just before they're about to move in together and just after her apartment has been rented to someone else. But he's not just an insensitive jerk toying with her heart. He got spooked by the speed of their relationship (they'd only been going out six weeks) and he'd left another woman for her. The guy is genuinely torn, wracked with doubts and guilt.

Continue reading: Someone Like You Review

In The Bedroom Review


Very Good

Tragic movies that bore into their characters' raw emotions are all too often just melodramatic showpieces in which actors histrionically wrestle with their feelings in overwrought, look-at-me-cry performances. Think of any disease-of-the-week or ensemble-of-women flick in which somebody dies, and you'll know what I mean.

If "In the Bedroom" had been ground through the Hollywood machinery and offered to big name stars, it might have been one of those movies. But in the low-budget hands of actor-turned-director Todd Field (the piano player in "Eyes Wide Shut") it's a powerfully understated exposed nerve of a film, about the emotional wreckage of losing a child, told through the body language of broken hearts and depleted souls.

Beginning as a love story, the film stars Marisa Tomei as Natalie Strout, a young, small town mother preserving through an ugly divorce with the support of her even younger boyfriend, Frank Fowler (Nick Stahl), a promising architecture student ready to forgo an Ivy League scholarship to stay with her.

Continue reading: In The Bedroom Review

Anger Management Review


Unbearable

Writer David Dorfman, director Peter Segal and star Adam Sandler missed a golden opportunity in "Anger Management," a comedy bereft of laughs about a milquetoast office drone and designer of fat feline fashions (?) who is sentenced to rage therapy after an incident on an airline.

The incident: His repeated polite requests for a headset to watch the in-flight movie are absurdly mistaken for aggression by a flight crew with post-9/11 jitters. The missed opportunity: The concept's punchline should have been that he really is a rage-a-holic and the calm version of events we see is his skewed perspective of normalcy.

Instead, the picture sticks with the notions that typically dim-bulb Sandler (insert empty-eyed double-take head-cocks here) really is a misunderstood nice guy, and the actor fails to find a single genuine laugh in the story's goofball gimmick -- which is that his nutzo court-appointed therapist (Jack Nicholson, volume turned up to 11) moves in with him and makes his life a living hell.

Continue reading: Anger Management Review

The Guru Review


OK

Making fun of its own light comedy clichés (like its must- stop- the- girl- from- marrying- the- wrong- guy finale) could have added an extra layer of laughs to a movie like "The Guru" -- if it wasn't entirely dependent on those same clichés to drive its plot.

Amiable, boy-faced Indian actor Jimi Mistry (seen in the imports "East is East" and "The Mystic Masseur") plays an enthusiastic immigrant named Ramu Gupta who comes to America with wide-eyed dreams of stardom, born of his jones for the movie musical "Grease." But through a series of screwball misunderstandings, he's soon being celebrated by Manhattan's trendy elite as "the Guru of Sex" -- a spiritual healer who tells the people what they want to hear: nookie makes good therapy.

Ramu gets all the sexual philosophy that's making him famous (he's soon appearing on "Sally Jesse Raphael") from a good-hearted porno actress (Heather Graham) he met when he mistakenly wandered into the wrong kind of audition. But in one of those ham-fisted movie mix-ups that could be corrected with a single line of dialogue, she thinks she's advising him on how to overcome performance anxiety and become an X-rated stud, and therefore shares her innermost sexual secrets.

Continue reading: The Guru Review

The Wild Thornberrys Movie Review


Good

Far more imaginative and ambitious than the trivial, cash-in features Nickelodeon has made from its other animated TV series, "The Wild Thornberrys Movie" is a funny, original, whimsical but meaningful story of an intrepid 12-year-old girl's adventures in Africa.

Directors Cathy Malkasian and Jeff McGrath get off to a bit of a clumsy start, catching up uninitiated audience members with a rushed, "the story so far"-style prologue that establishes the Thornberrys as globe-trotting naturalists (can-do American mother and pith-helmeted English father host their own cable TV nature show). In the first two minutes a busy voice-over also explains that nerdy heroine Eliza (all freckles, braces and braids) was given the ability to talk to the animals by a tribal shaman, and that she'll lose the gift if she ever tells anyone about it. Obviously this fact will come into play, because it's greatly emphasized.

But soon Eliza's adventures begin in earnest, when she's packed off to boarding school -- on the advice of her priggish blue-blood grandmother -- after almost being kidnapped by poachers while playing with some friendly cougar cubs.

Continue reading: The Wild Thornberrys Movie Review

The Watcher Review


Terrible

Keanu Reeves may very well be the least convincing, least frightening serial killer in the history of the psycho-thriller genre in "The Watcher."

Starring as a supposedly brilliant whack job who strangles lonely young girls with piano wire, he delivers his dialogue as if every line ended with the word "dude" and somebody dubbed it out in post-production.

"Shall we dance (dude)?" he grins goofily at a simpering girl he's tied to a chair, shaking his ratty surfer hair from side to side as a voice-over by haunted FBI guy James Spader explains that Reeves likes to revive his victims over and over in order to torture them.

Continue reading: The Watcher Review

Marisa Tomei

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Marisa Tomei

Date of birth

4th December, 1964

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.64




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Marisa Tomei Movies

Spider-Man: Homecoming Movie Review

Spider-Man: Homecoming Movie Review

This may be the third reboot of this franchise in 15 years, risking audience exhaustion,...

Spider Man: Homecoming Trailer

Spider Man: Homecoming Trailer

It turns out that Tony Stark makes a better Avenger than a mentor. After a...

Spider-Man: Homecoming Trailer

Spider-Man: Homecoming Trailer

Peter Parker is a teenager who has a lot to deal with after being bitten...

Captain America: Civil War Trailer

Captain America: Civil War Trailer

The Avengers are suffering from an image crisis. As much good that they do and...

The Big Short Movie Review

The Big Short Movie Review

Smart and snappy, this comedy is one of the scariest films of the year, using...

Love the Coopers (aka Christmas With the Coopers) Movie Review

Love the Coopers (aka Christmas With the Coopers) Movie Review

This may look like it's going to be a zany Christmas romp, but it's really...

Captain America: Civil War - First Look Trailer

Captain America: Civil War - First Look Trailer

As the world of Marvel super heroes become ever more entwined, Captain America: Civil War...

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Love The Coopers - Making A Christmas Film Featurette Trailer

Love The Coopers - Making A Christmas Film Featurette Trailer

Charlotte Cooper is the family matriarch and all she wants is for her family to...

Love The Coopers Trailer

Love The Coopers Trailer

Charlotte Cooper is determined to make this Christmas the best holiday the family has ever...

The Big Short Trailer

The Big Short Trailer

When Dr. Michael Burry discovered that the housing market in the US relied upon a...

Trainwreck Movie Review

Trainwreck Movie Review

Amy Schumer makes her big screen debut with a script that feels like a much-extended...

Trainwreck Trailer

Trainwreck Trailer

Amy enjoys her life in the big city with her comfortable apartment, wacky friends and...

Love Is Strange Movie Review

Love Is Strange Movie Review

In this pointed and involving New York drama, the snap of realistic dialogue more than...

Love Is Strange - Clip Trailer

Love Is Strange - Clip Trailer

After living together for 39 years, Ben (John Lithgow) and George (Alfred Molina) are able...

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