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Spider Man: Homecoming Trailer


It turns out that Tony Stark makes a better Avenger than a mentor. After a teenager named Peter Parker gets bitten by a radioactive spider, he finds himself with some incredible super powers; increased agility, and the ability to climb walls and shoot webs. Naturally, he feels alone with no idea how to use his newfound skills. That's when he meets Iron Man, who intructs him to use his powers to rid the streets of petty criminals with the strict caveat that he must leave any supervillain problems to the Avengers. It doesn't take long for Peter to get frustrated with Tony's treatment of him, and he longs to be a fully-fledged member of the team. Of course, he is still a kid, but when a new menace threatens the city in the form of the Vulture, he's determined to help take him down whether Tony likes it or not.

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Spider-Man: Homecoming Trailer


Peter Parker is a teenager who has a lot to deal with after being bitten by a radioactive spider. He suddenly finds himself equipped with the ability to climb buildings and spin webs - powers that he knows he wants to use for good but of which he really doesn't know where to start. He's being mentored by Tony Stark, who suggests he keep to small-time crime rather than taking on the city's supervillains, but he's ready to take on the big guys and he's certainly tired of being patronised by Iron Man who doesn't think he's ready to become an Avenger especially when he's still got high school to complete. When a new menace in the shape of the Vulture makes himself known in New York, the newly dubbed Spider-Man wants to help take him down, but how can he do that with the Avengers trying to keep him out of the loop?

Continue: Spider-Man: Homecoming Trailer

Captain America: Civil War Trailer


The Avengers are suffering from an image crisis. As much good that they do and as many lives that they save, the superheroes also cause unlimited amounts of damage to cities and civilisation. The government wish to find an answer to this problem and they decide that all superheroes should be registered and held accountable for their actions. 

Tony Stark is brought in to begin talks on behalf of The Avengers, knowing how much damage he's personally done under his superhero disguise, Stark see the government's point and decides that a register wouldn't be entirely unwelcome. Captain America on the other hand has no such wishes; The Cap sees any government intervention as something beyond reasonable requirement. In the middle of all this is Cap's old friend Bucky who could be prosecuted under the new laws. As The Avengers are forced to split into two halves, it looks like there's going to be no way for the old team to form any kind of agreement. 

 As their opinions deepen and rivalries are deepens, certain members of Hydra begin to tighten their control and their plans for future domination of the world are getting stronger. The Avengers must find a way to put their differences aside in order to beat the real enemy.

The Big Short Review

Excellent

Smart and snappy, this comedy is one of the scariest films of the year, using humour to outline the 2008 economic collapse from the inside. With characters who are based on real people, the film shows how economists made a fortune from the financial devastation inflicted on millions of families. And the movie cleverly points out that all of this happened (and people are still getting away with it) because the general public can't be bothered to pay attention.

Things were so booming in the first years of this century that it was easy for the media to divert the attention of Americans away from the dark underbelly of the financial world, creating big scandals out of nothing, spurring rampant buying sprees and making stars of non-entities like the Kardashians. Meanwhile in 2005, investment expert Michael Burry (Christian Bale) noticed that America's mortgage market was turning toxic. So he offered to "short" it, betting against this always-stable market by purchasing credit default swaps. The banks thought they would make a fortune from him, carrying on their dangerous practices. But other experts saw Burry's point, including the nerdy genius Mark Baum (Steve Carell), the shark-like Jared Vennett (Ryan Gosling) and a pair of newbies (Finn Wittrock and John Magaro) who tip off their reclusive mentor Ben Rickert (Brad Pitt). When the economy imploded, these men became billionaires.

Director-cowriter Adam McKay is better known for silly movies like Anchorman, so he packs this film with raucous cutaways to pop culture references of the period, as well as hilariously absurd explanations of economic issues from, for example, Margot Robbie in a bubble bath or Selena Gomez playing blackjack. This approach actually heightens the horror of what's going on as fraudulent bankers and corrupt government officials conspire to undermine the foundations of the economy. Although the explanations still feel like gibberish to mere mortals, it's at least presented in a way that's entertaining.

Continue reading: The Big Short Review

Marisa Tomei - 21st Annual Critics Choice Awards 2016 held at the Barker Hanger Airport in Santa Monica. at Barker Hanger Airport - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 17th January 2016

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Marisa Tomei

Marisa Tomei - 21st Annual Critics' Choice Awards - Arrivals at Barker Hangar, Critics' Choice Awards - Santa Monica, California, United States - Sunday 17th January 2016

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Love The Coopers (aka Christmas With The Coopers) Review

Very Good

This may look like it's going to be a zany Christmas romp, but it's really a warm exploration of family connections, essentially an American take on Love Actually's multi-strand comedy-drama. At least it has an unusually strong cast and moments of hilarity scattered throughout the story. And while it's never very deep, the themes are strongly resonant.

The Cooper family is gathering for what Charlotte (Diane Keaton) hopes will be one last perfect Christmas together. She knows that her 40-year marriage to Sam (John Goodman) is on the brink, but is ignoring that to plan a massive dinner. Their son Hank (Ed Helms) is stinging from divorce and unemployment, while daughter Eleanor (Olivia Wilde) has picked up a hunky soldier (Jake Lacy) in the airport and asks him to pose as her boyfriend so her family will stop asking about her love life. Meanwhile, Charlotte's father Bucky (Alan Arkin) is trying to cheer up his favourite waitress (Amanda Seyfried), and Charlotte's sister Emma (Marisa Tomei) is delayed when a cop (Anthony Mackie) arrests her for shoplifting.

Narrated with wry joviality by Steve Martin, the interwoven stories are fairly simplistic, but each touches a raw nerve. And the above-average cast brings out the underlying themes without overplaying their scenes. Keaton and Goodman add subtle shades to the slightly undemanding central roles, while Arkin finds a couple of new textures to his usual twinkly grandad persona. Helms and Wilde strike the right balance in their intriguingly unlikeable roles, while Tomei gets the most complex character as a woman who feels like she's merely watched her life drift along. By contrast, the outsiders played by Seyfried, Lacy and Mackie are much less defined, but each actor brings just enough magnetic energy. The most wasted performer is June Squibb, as a ditzy old aunt who's little more than the requisite gross-out relative.

Continue reading: Love The Coopers (aka Christmas With The Coopers) Review

Captain America: Civil War - First Look Trailer


As the world of Marvel super heroes become ever more entwined, Captain America: Civil War picks up where Ant-Man ends. As the Avengers take on more and more missions, the damage they cause is ever increasing and the government feel it's time to put an end to their unlimited power.

Captain America gains information so sensitive that he knows even his closest friends aren't going to believe it, Captain America and Falcon are alone. With The Avengers now broken into two sides, Captain America believing the superheroes shouldn't be regulated and Iron Man on the other, believing the government have a valid argument.

Can The Avengers overcome their differences and fight a new force that threatens to destroy the world as we know it. Captain America: Civil War sees many of our favourite Marvel character appear, these include: Black Widow, Hawkeye, Spider-Man, Black Panther & War Machine.

Marisa Tomei - AFI FEST 2015 Presented By Audi Closing Night Gala Premiere of Paramount Pictures' 'The Big Short' - Arrivals at TCL Chinese 6 Theatres - Hollywood, California, United States - Thursday 12th November 2015

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Marisa Tomei - New York premiere of 'Ricki And The Flash' at AMC Lincoln Square Theater - Arrivals - New York City, United States - Monday 3rd August 2015

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Marisa Tomei - 2015 MOCA Gala presented by Louis Vuitton at The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 30th May 2015

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Marisa Tomei - The Museum Of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles Annual Gala Presented By Louis Vuitton at The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 30th May 2015

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Cameron Silver, Katie Traina, Todd Traina, Marisa Tomei, Noah Cowan and Sarah Rutson - Shots of a variety of stars were photographed at the 2015 Film Society Awards ceremony, This year's award recipients included Mexican film director Guillermo del Toro, who received the San Francisco International Film Festival's Irving M. Levin Directing Award. Also American actor Richard Gere was honored with the Peter J. Owens Award. The awards ceremony was held at The Armory in San Francisco, California, United States - Monday 27th April 2015

Cameron Silver, Katie Traina, Todd Traina, Marisa Tomei, Noah Cowan and Sarah Rutson

Marisa Tomei - The 30th Film Independent Spirit Awards - Outside Arrivals at Santa Monica, Independent Spirit Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 21st February 2015

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Marisa Tomei - 2015 Film Independent Spirit Awards - Outside Arrivals at Independent Spirit Awards - Hollywood, California, United States - Saturday 21st February 2015

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Love Is Strange - Clip


After living together for 39 years, Ben (John Lithgow) and George (Alfred Molina) are able to get married to one another. As George works as a music teacher for a Catholic school, the news of his same-sex marriage causes him to lose his job, and with Ben receiving a pension, the couple are forced to live off the small amount of money. When they are forced to seek a place to live with their friends and family, they are forced to live separately with different families. In their new life, they discover the true meaning of love and friendship, and teach a little to those around them in the process. 

Continue: Love Is Strange - Clip

Marisa Tomei - Photographs of a variety of stars as they arrived at the 24th Annual Gotham Independent Film Awards which were held at Cipriani Wall Street in New York City, New York, United States - Monday 1st December 2014

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Marisa Tomei

Marisa Tomei - Marisa Tomei departs from Los Angeles Internatinoal Airport (LAX) - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 14th November 2014

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Marisa Tomei - It's Only A Play Opening Night - Arrivals at Gerald Shoenfeld Theater - New York, New York, United States - Thursday 9th October 2014

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The Rewrite Trailer


Keith Michaels once had it all; recognition and money from an award-winning screenplay and an attractive wife to share it with. However, now he's nearing middle-age and he no longer seems to have any of it. Sure, his famed movie is still a hit, but he's struggling to find any more work and now that he's sadly divorced, the only support he has is from his agent. Desperate to make ends meet, the agent offers him last resort; there's a teaching post vacancy at a small town university in Binghamton, available to teachers in screenwriting. With a Golden Globe hit under his belt, he's a sure-fire candidate for the job - but it's the last thing he wants to do. However, he soon finds the silver lining in that a string of attractive young students have applied to enrol on his course and he uses the opportunity to revel amongst young women, while doing as little work as possible. When he meets mature student Holly though, he's inspired to turn his spiralling life back around.

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Marisa Tomei - The HBO Films New York premiere of The Normal Heart at the Ziegfeld Theatre - Arrivals. - New York, New York, United States - Tuesday 13th May 2014

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Marisa Tomei

Marisa Tomei - 2014 Tribeca Film Festival - "Loitering With Intent" Premiere -Red Carpet Arrivals - Manhattan, New York, United States - Saturday 19th April 2014

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Marisa Tomei and Sam Rockwell
Brian Geraghty, Isabelle Mcnally, Adam Rapp, Ivan Martin, Marisa Tomei, Sam Rockwell and Michael Godere
Ivan Martin, Sam Rockwell, Marisa Tomei and Michael Godere

Marisa Tomei, Ivan Martin, writer Michael Godere, Adam Rapp, Isabelle McNally, Bryan Geraphty and Sam Rockwell - 'Loitering With Intent' premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival - Arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Friday 18th April 2014

Marisa Tomei, Ivan Martin, Writer Michael Godere, Adam Rapp, Isabelle Mcnally, Bryan Geraphty and Sam Rockwell
Marisa Tomei, Ivan Martin, Writer Michael Godere, Adam Rapp, Isabelle Mcnally, Bryan Geraphty and Sam Rockwell
Marisa Tomei, Ivan Martin, Writer Michael Godere, Adam Rapp, Isabelle Mcnally, Bryan Geraphty and Sam Rockwell
Marisa Tomei, Ivan Martin, Writer Michael Godere, Adam Rapp, Isabelle Mcnally, Bryan Geraphty and Sam Rockwell
Marisa Tomei, Ivan Martin, Writer Michael Godere, Adam Rapp, Isabelle Mcnally, Bryan Geraphty and Sam Rockwell

Parental Guidance - Trailer Trailer


Artie and Diane Decker are the aging parents of a working mother, Alice, whose busy lifestyle means she has to enlist the help of her parents to look after her three young children while she and her husband Phil go away on a business trip. While Diane seems enthusiastic about seeing her grandchildren, Artie is less motivated when he realises that his old fashioned, tough love parenting methods would be lost on the 21st century kids. Alice certainly realises she's got her work cut out trying to teach her stubborn father how to deal with them, remembering the many occasions he let her down when she was a child. Will Artie and Diane's 'second chance' at parenting teach them that their daughter has got the right approach? Or will the venture end in disaster?

This heart-warming comedy is a wonderful story about the unity of family. It is directed by Andy Fickman ('She's the Man', 'The Game Plan') and written by Lisa Addario and Joe Syracuse (previously having worked together on 'Lover Girl' and 'Surf's Up') with re-writes from Lowell Ganz and Babaloo Mandel (both of 'Tooth Fairy' and 'Robots'). It is set for release in UK cinemas everywhere on December 28th 2012.

Starring: Billy Crystal, Bette Midler, Marisa Tomei, Bailee Madison, Tom Everett Scott, Madison Lintz, Rhoda Griffis, Gedde Watanabe, Dwayne Boyd & Joshua Rush

The Ides Of March Review


Excellent
As a writer-director, Clooney delivers another complex exploration of American politics in this lively drama about the pressures of the campaign trail. The plot is somewhat theatrical, but the stellar cast brings it to life.

Steve (Gosling) is working with campaign director Paul (Hoffman) on the presidential campaign of Pennsylvania Governor Mike Morris (Clooney), and the current focus is the pivotal Ohio primary. As Steve starts to fall for young intern Molly (Wood), he is invited to meet with rival campaign manager Tom (Giamatti). And soon he finds his idealistic world disintegrating around him: Molly reveals information that could destroy Morris' campaign, while meeting with Tom jeopardises Steve's job. Meanwhile, backroom deals with an ambitious senator (Wright) call everyone's integrity into question.

Continue reading: The Ides Of March Review

Crazy, Stupid, Love. Review


Excellent
A strong cast makes the most of an insightful, jaggedly hilarious script. And it also helps that the actors and directors cleverly depict real-life situations in ways that are both witty and emotionally engaging.

Cal (Carell) is shocked when his wife Emily (Moore) tells him she's had an affair and wants a divorce. He has never even dated another woman and has no idea how to start, but one night in a singles' bar the slick womaniser Jacob (Gosling) inexplicably offers to mentor him. But even though he learns quickly, Cal is still hung up on Emily. Meanwhile, Jacob finally meets his match in the spiky-sexy Hannah (Stone), while Cal and Emily's teen son (Bobo) pines after his babysitter (Tipton), who has a crush of her own.

Continue reading: Crazy, Stupid, Love. Review

Crazy Stupid Love Trailer


Cal Weaver and his wife Emily live a perfect sub-urban life, kids, a pleasant house and a good job he can rely on. Everything is perfect, until Emily reveals that she's had an affair and wishes to divorce her high-school love.

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The Lincoln Lawyer Review


Good
Enjoyably twisty but too shallow to be fully satisfying, this legal thriller lopes along at a pleasing pace through its overlong running time. But it's watchable mainly because we know there will be at least one big twist in the tale.

Mick (McConaughey) runs his successful L.A. law practice from his vintage Lincoln. He has a daughter with his public-prosecutor ex Maggie (Tomei) and works closely with his private-eye pal Frank (Macy). His new case involves the wealthy Louis (Phillippe), who claims he didn't violently assault a prostitute.

But the more Mick and Frank look into things, the fishier they get. And Mick will need to do some unorthodox things to win the case against the tenacious D.A. (Lucas) and achieve real justice.

Continue reading: The Lincoln Lawyer Review

The Lincoln Lawyer Trailer


Mickey Haller might not be one of the top lawyers in LA but the service he provides for his clients is an effective one. Generally Mickey defends bike gangs, prostitutes and drug dealers but when he learns of a case that might just give him a huge break, it's something he can't turn down.

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Cyrus Review


Excellent
This twisted variation on the romantic-comedy takes a sharply funny look at male relationships. And Reilly and Hill get to shine in extremely vivid characters that keep us both laughing and cringing with fear over what might happen next.

After seven years, John (Reilly) still hasn't got over the break-up of his marriage to Jamie (Keener), but now that she's marrying Tim (Walsh) he really should move on. At a party, he meets Molly (Tomei), an improbably hot woman who actually seems to like his goofy behaviour, and their relationship gets serious very quickly. But Molly's 21-year-old son Cyrus (Hill) isn't quite ready for his mother to settle down with another man and launches a silent campaign to scupper the romance.

Continue reading: Cyrus Review

Cyrus Trailer


John's ex-wife is about to get remarried - John isn't really ready to move on yet. When the down on his luck divorcee finally finds a new 'woman of his dreams' he discovers she has another man in her life, her son Cyrus.

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The Wrestler Review


Extraordinary
For those who have been following Darren Aronofsky's career since he broke out in 2000 with Requiem for a Dream, his latest work, The Wrestler, might very well come as a bit of a shock. Unlike Requiem and 2006's The Fountain, the film does not garner its power from hyperactive editing (the former) nor grandiose flourishes of the patently ludicrous (the latter). Shot in grainy 16mm by the estimable Maryse Alberti, a cinematographer who has spent the last few years shooting documentaries, The Wrestler realigns Aronofsky as a director concerned with the slow burn of American neo-realism more than hyperactive pseudo-transcendentalism.

It is also the resurrection, renovation, and reinvention of Mickey Rourke in the King Lear of self-reflexive roles. Walking hunched with his long strands of bleached-blonde hair covering his face until he puts it up under a hairnet, revealing an unsightly hearing aid, Rourke's Randy "The Ram" Robinson, an aging legend of the 1980s pro-wrestling boom, walks like a grand warrior just starting to get used to the knife in his back after years of minor shows as a nostalgic draw. After suffering a heart attack, Randy declines an upcoming rematch with his erstwhile nemesis The Ayatollah and tries to clean himself up, taking a weekend shift at the local deli counter, ensuring that his landlord won't evict him from his trailer.

Continue reading: The Wrestler Review

Chaplin Review


Very Good
Movies about movie stars are always a dodgy affair. They reek of in-jokes, chumminess, and a glossy version of Hollywood that has never really existed.

As actors go, Charlie Chaplin is at least a worthy candidate for a biopic. His impact on the acting profession and especially physical comedy is hard to overstate, and the man remains an icon whose face (or silhouette) embodies cinema. In the hands of Richard Attenborough, Chaplin's life is digested into the highlights -- from vaudevillian youth to his arrival in Hollywood to his amazingly fast rise to fame. Attenborough even dabbles in Chaplin's investigation by J. Edgar Hoover's FBI. Naturally, the running series of Chaplin's famous romantic entanglements are carefully tallied, the actresses playing the various Mrs. Chaplins (and near misses) making up a who's who of early-'90s starlets.

Continue reading: Chaplin Review

War, Inc. Review


Weak
The road to Hell is paved with good intentions, and in the case of John Cusack's over-the-top satire of the Iraq War, War, Inc., the intentions are obvious and the road leads to a particular place in Hell presided over by filmmakers (Stanley Kramer resides on the throne there) who want to fight the good fight but use a two-by-four pounded into the back of a viewer's head to emphasize the obvious. As writer/producer/star of War, Inc. Cusack wants to make a statement about the venality of the United States' involvement in Iraq and wants to make that statement in the worst way. And, unfortunately, he does. Cusack attempts to reconceive the hit man premise of Grosse Point Blank as a lacerating and biting political satire in the vein of Dr. Strangelove or Wag the Dog. Unfortunately, the end result is more along the lines of those disastrous, live-action cartoonish romps of the stinky 1960s vintage a la John Goldfarb, Please Come Home.

As in Grosse Point Blank, Cusack plays a world-weary hit man, Brand Hauser, who works for a Halliburton-inspired international corporation that has just completed a contract on the first 100-percent outsourced road in the fictional Middle Eastern country of Turaqistan. The head honcho of the corporation is the ex-Vice President (Dan Akyroyd on a toilet) who orders Hauser into Turaqistan to assassinate the chief Turaqistani minister, Omar Sharif (Lyubomir Neikov). Omar plans to one-up the corporation by installing his own oil pipeline in competition, and the corporation will have none of that. Hauser arrives under cover as the head of the Brand USA Trade Show, where he is responsible for a big gala extravaganza starring Yonica Babyyeah (Hilary Duff in a change of pace role as a sexy, slutty Britney Spears clone; at one point she moans pointedly after dropping a scorpion down her pants). Also on hand in Turaqistan is Natalie Hegalhuzen (Marisa Tomei), a Nation-esque reporter who immediately rubs Hauser the wrong way. Could this be love?

Continue reading: War, Inc. Review

Before The Devil Knows You're Dead Review


Excellent
At the tender age of 83, director Sidney Lumet opens his latest film with a married couple going at it, doggy-style, in a bedroom full of mirrors. The wife is black-haired and thin while the husband is bulky and stares at the reflection as if it's his only moment of true triumph. In a recent interview, Lumet described the image as the man's idea of "classy"; an act of high-class privilege that the man can only hope to aspire to.

The man in question is Andy (Philip Seymour Hoffman), a pudgy volcano of a corporate hustler with a trophy wife. Gina (Marisa Tomei) fits that role to a T as she spends Andy's money and enjoys mid-day quickies with Andy's brother Hank (Ethan Hawke). Hank's money goes towards his ex-wife (a great Amy Ryan) and daughter while Andy's cash, when not with Gina, is spent on heroin in the très chic twentieth-floor apartment of his dealer in Manhattan. The boys need dough and their bourgeois office jobs aren't keeping it coming in. That's when Andy gets the idea.

Continue reading: Before The Devil Knows You're Dead Review

Rescue Me: Season Three Review


Weak
In the first couple of seasons, Denis Leary's FDNY fire opera Rescue Me flung itself through windows and played out in traffic. It busted jaws, opened old wounds just for spite and made grand sport of the whole ungodly train wreck of it all. It was almost as though co-creators Leary and Peter Tolan (The Larry Sanders Show) felt they were going to get canceled any second and so chucked all caution to the wind. In between sitting around the firehouse and indulging in some of the more profane dialogue ever to grace the TV screen (even on basic cable), the characters were subjected to just about any disaster Leary and Tolan could come up with, anything to push these emotionally stunted mugs to the wall and see what devastation they would mete out in response.

But somehow, the pissy little export from the land of the five boroughs -- and rarely has a show so viscerally captured the city's day-to-day, boiling-over, rat-in-a-cage anger -- survived. And this is after sending the wife of the Chief (Jack McGee) into a debilitating Alzheimer's nightmare and not only devastating Tommy Gavin's (Leary) family with the long-term and low-intensity emotional warfare of a never-ending divorce but then, near the end of the second season, having a drunk driver kill Tommy's little boy. That tragedy was then capped off by a nothing-to-lose Uncle Teddy (Lenny Clarke) gunning down the driver in full view of the cops, since a life behind bars seemed preferable to anything else he had going.

Continue reading: Rescue Me: Season Three Review

Wild Hogs Review


Good
Prior to my screening of Wild Hogs, the theatre played an advertisement in which two identical cars "sumo fight" on an elevated circular stage. Each car is distinguished by its performance. One charges forth, its engines roaring healthily, its nose forcing the other back. This other, its engine squealing pathetically, submits to the force of its opponent until eventually plummeting from the edge of the stage. The difference between the two cars? The first was running on superior fuel.

This car reminds me of Wild Hogs. Ostensibly, Wild Hogs is the same model as every other middle-of-the-road road movie; a hybrid vehicle that mishmashes middle-age crisis comedy with fish-out-of-water, city-slicker slapstick. However, its charismatic and effortless cast, and the occasional bit of wit, see that it performs better than the usual Hollywood dross regularly offered up as comedy. Hence its box office success.

Continue reading: Wild Hogs Review

Loverboy Review


Bad
Much like Robert Towne's recent adaptation of Ask the Dust, Kevin Bacon's Loverboy is a labor of love. Sometime in 2003, Kyra Sedgwick (Bacon's spouse) handed him a copy of Victoria Redel's novel, Loverboy, and both found themselves eager to bring the story to the screen. And similar to Towne's effort, Bacon is so enthusiastic about the material that he can't get his concentration correct.

Emily Stoll (Sedgwick) is in her late 20s and roaming the Midwest and just about everywhere else for the right ejaculate. After a miscarriage from a "no father," multi-partner pregnancy, she meets Paul (Campbell Scott) and in one night of passion, a child is conceived. The son, Paul aka Loverboy (Dominic Scott Kay), quickly becomes Emily's entire life, trying to make life a magical, ongoing discovery. Emily has nightmarish flashbacks of her lovebird parents (Bacon and Marisa Tomei) who were too busy being in love to take care of a child properly, and she daydreams of her fantasy mother, Mrs. Harker (Sandra Bullock). Loverboy eventually becomes wise to his mother's obsessive grasp on him and begins to revolt, especially when she tries to seduce Mark (Matt Dillon), a father figure. This, of course, can't end well.

Continue reading: Loverboy Review

Danika Review


OK
Danika Merrick (Marisa Tomei) is a young suburban mother with a large family and an over-active imagination. When the brutal armed robbery of the bank in which she works winds up being nothing more than a really vivid hallucination, Danika decides to stay home and spend more time with the family -- much to her teenaged children's consternation. More hallucinations follow -- a missing and murdered girl, a terrorist attack on a school bus, a severed head in the fridge - and with each fresh jolt of psychosis, Danika's world gets smaller and less grounded in reality. She keeps a close eye on her kids and becomes obsessed with their budding sexuality. Danika worries about the faithfulness of her husband and the age of her psychiatrist. Pills follow. Nerves jangle. While everyone around her -- including the cops -- is convinced Danika's off her rocker, some of the hallucinations start coming true. Perhaps these aren't mere illusions but premonitions?

Danika is something of a puzzle film. Nearly every sequence contains some hint at the outcome. Some whisper towards the future. At times the approach is engaging, others just irritating. Scripter Joshua Leibner hopes to generate confusion and at the same time lend an almost reverential power to the onscreen happenings. It's like asking, "where is the line between psychosis and divination?" Thankfully the film moves towards a more satisfying conclusion than freshman year philosophy banter. Well, somewhat more satisfying: Every telegraphed shock and twist in Danika has been done before. It doesn't feel old, necessarily, just too familiar. Too comfortable.

Continue reading: Danika Review

Just A Kiss Review


Weak
It looks like actor Fisher Stevens discovered rotoscoping in 2002, and figured a little post-production trickery (used at random and only on certain characters at certain times throughout the film) would distract people enough into looking past the general unwatchability of this black comedy/romance that wastes just about everything it has going for it. A few funny set pieces and some impressive actors (Tomei, Eldard, Dinklage, Sedgwick) all turn up to be for naught. Stevens would rather show off his budget animation technique and tell a silly "turn back the clock" story that is alternately nonsensical and trite.

Factotum Review


Very Good
While Bent Hamer's Factotum isn't equal to the source material, it's a must-see for all of us fascinated by Charles Bukowski, by his persona as much as his words. Adapted from the namesake novel by Hamer and Jim Stark, Factotum's central character is Henry Chinaski, Bukowski's fictional alter ego who, like its author, is a shambling, hard-drinking writer, slumming away at odd jobs, quartering in hole-in-the-wall apartments, while he scrawls away at poems and stories every chance he gets.To watch Matt Dillon personify Chinaski/Bukowski is thrilling: At least from outward appearance, the actor has nailed the role, and, at times, he seems to be channeling Bukowski from the grave. It's an eerie simulacrum: Dillon skulks about the screen, slouch-shouldered, sporting a scruffy beard, a mane of combed-back hair, wearing the short-sleeves and slacks that was Bukowski's standard wardrobe, regarding the world with hangdog eyes and a jaw jutting outward in a subtle show of defiance.Equally arresting is the always-fantastic Lili Taylor, playing Chinaski's on-again, off-again girlfriend, Jan. She's his kindred spirit, which means the two get along best with a jug of wine between them. As Jan, Taylor projects a mannish energy. Wearing a perpetual sneer, keeping her frayed hair and shoulders tossed back, she enters any room like she's spoiling for a fight. Jan is also fiercely possessive of Chinaski and panics whenever any windfall threatens their low-rent, booze-sodden lifestyle. She's also the only person who can push the bearish Chinaski's buttons. When they break up, their trails lead back to each other and entwine, as before, then wind apart again, exactly like twin DNA strands.Chinaski's search for work and his rocky relationship with Jan form Factotum's nominal narrative thread. No sooner does Chinaski land a job that he gets bored with it or chafes under the authority of white-collar boobs, and leaves. He hates them so much -- in the same way he hates his father (as one scene implies) -- that he defies their authority in ways both direct and passive-aggressive: After one boss, finding him at a local dive instead of on the job, fires him, Chinaski calmly replies by offering him a drink. Midway through Factotum, we get a romantic interlude of sorts involving Laura (Marisa Tomei), a gold-digging floozy. Laura's got her hands in the pockets of a moneyed, European eccentric (Didier Flamand) who offers wayward women asylum in his morgue-like home. Chinaski's sojourn with Laura and her ilk takes Factotum into outer David Lynch territory, and, somehow, we're glad when Chinaski breaks free of them and returns to his sunnier, native habitat of the urban jungle.Like Post Office and Ham on Rye, Factotum is ultimately a chronicle of its author's anxious, unconquerable desire to write, to transcribe his toils, obsessions, and pains into the stuff of art. Beneath Bukowski's reticent surface, fires raged -- stoked by the man's angry, lustful, transgressive emotions. Words plucked from those fires were then hammered into shape and branded onto the page. It's that smoldering quality in the prose that missing in Stark and Hamer's handling -- the contradiction between the inner and outer dimensions of the writer. Rather than finding an expressive style that rendered the world as grotesquely as Chinaski sees it, a style to counterpoint the character's calm, composed exterior, the material settles for a safe, neutered approach. This Factotum is more eager and willing to put Bukowski's words in prettily composed frames. Hamer and Stark only get the outlines of Chinaski's life right -- the hand-to-mouth living and boozing in which all that spiritually sustains the writer are the hours spent hunched over his notepad with a ballpoint pen. Finally, Dillon and Taylor are the sources of Factotum's vitriol and sharpness. They seem willing to delve where Hamer's direction dare not go.Last call.

Welcome To Sarajevo Review


Weak
If Woody Harrelson is a journalist, then hell, I'm Woody Harrelson.

Continue reading: Welcome To Sarajevo Review

The Watcher Review


Bad
Keanu Reeves, get thee back to The Matrix as soon as possible.

Following one of the most pitiful title sequences I've ever seen, The Watcher actually proceeds to become one of the most pitiful thrillers I've ever seen. And that takes some doing... but let me tell you how.

Continue reading: The Watcher Review

The Perez Family Review


Bad
How can you have a Perez family without Rosie? Put aside the fact that Tomei and Huston are decidedly not Cuban, I had to read a plot summary to find out this was supposed to be a comedy. Oh really, now? This story, adapted from a novel, picks up the fragments of at least four Perezes, Cuban refugees who find themselves inventing a "family" to better gain political asylum. The plot centers around Molina's search for long-list (real) wife Huston, only he falls in love with slut Tomei, while Huston falls for cop Palminteri. Poor Trini Alvarado is wasted as Huston's wide-eyed sidekick. Everyone else is wasted on a hopelessly dull story which positively puts you to sleep.

Alfie Review


Good

Playing an inveterate womanizer as a sympathetic hero didn't work especially well for Michael Caine in 1966's "Alfie." He was Oscar-nominated for the performance, but his title character was a misogynistic, egomaniacal cad -- taking advantage of vulnerable women, then disposing of them offhandedly. Even when a vague health problem became a plot point meant to turn his life around, there was still nothing redeemable about the jerk.

On the other hand, in this year's "Alfie" remake, the irresistible Jude Law plays a more credibly charismatic and playful playboy whose contented superficiality steadily gives way to emerging self-awareness and perceptible depth -- which surprises even Alfie himself.

As the wily rake admits -- frankly, charmingly and direct-to-camera -- his concurrent affairs with a bevy of Manhattan beauties are a product of good looks, practiced flattery, an upscale metrosexual wardrobe, his English accent and the fact that he drives a limo.

Continue reading: Alfie Review

Marisa Tomei

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Marisa Tomei

Date of birth

4th December, 1964

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.64




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Marisa Tomei Movies

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