Marisa Paredes

Marisa Paredes

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Marisa Paredes - Presentation of the film 'My Italian Family' at Madrid Princesa Cinema - Madrid, Spain - Wednesday 15th July 2015

Marisa Paredes
Marisa Paredes
Marisa Paredes
Marisa Paredes
Marisa Paredes
Marisa Paredes

Marisa Paredes - Marisa Paredes during the 28th annual Goya Film Awards ceremony - Madrid, Spain - Sunday 9th February 2014

Marisa Paredes

The Skin I Live In Review


Excellent
With his bold, assured filmmaking style and heavy echoes of Hitchcock's Vertigo, Almodovar creates a lean, twisty thriller that plays with issues of revenge and identity in very dark ways.

Robert (Banderas) is a skin-transplant specialist who goes against bioethics rules to experiment on a new kind of skin for Vera (Anaya), a young woman he keeps trapped in his home and cares for with the help of his childhood nanny Marilia (Paredes). But everyone has a secret, and Robert's relates to a young man (Cornet) he kidnapped six years earlier following an incident that drove his teen daughter (Suarez) to suicide. Actually, all of this started much earlier when Robert's wife was horribly burned in a car accident.

Continue reading: The Skin I Live In Review

The Skin I Live In Trailer


Twelve years ago, plastic surgeon Dr Robert Ledgard's wife was burnt to death in a car crash. Since then he has been trying to recreate a skin that will be virtually indestructible against any assault and damage, a practice that his fellow surgeons have called unethical.

Continue: The Skin I Live In Trailer

Marisa Paredes - Edgard Ramirez and Marisa Paredes Cannes, France - 2011 Cannes International Film Festival - Red Carpet for 'Les Beins-Aimes' and Closing Ceremony - Arrivals Sunday 22nd May 2011

Marisa Paredes

Marisa Paredes Thursday 19th May 2011 2011 Cannes International Film Festival - Day 9 -The Skin I Live In - Photocall Cannes, France

Antonio Banderas, Elena Anaya, Marisa Paredes and Pedro Almodovar
Antonio Banderas, Elena Anaya, Marisa Paredes and Pedro Almodovar

The Flower Of My Secret Review


Excellent
I've never enjoyed chick flicks.

Films like Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason strike me as cinematic equivalents to crack pipe hits for girls. They are down and dirty, pass the goods, quick fixes. Most chick flicks aren't even romantic, unless your idea of romance is watching two people kiss, fight, and babble like infants. They hardly qualify as comedies, either; most are middling, sentimental and absurd. (Before the hate mail pours in, "guy" flicks are just as mindless: monotonous action, deus ex machina, T&A, and unremitting explosions. Neither is the victor in a contest for taste.) Good comedic romances, true romantic comedies, are very hard to come by. The Flower of My Secret is one of those rare romantic comedies that is both very romantic and quite funny.

Continue reading: The Flower Of My Secret Review

All About My Mother Review


Very Good
Director Pedro Almodovar explains the relationship between tunnels and the main character of Manuela (Cecila Roth) in All About My Mother with the line: "Manuela runs away. She always runs away on a train, through endless tunnels."

Indeed, Manuela is always moving. With the untimely death of her son, Estoban, she moves to Barcelona to embark upon a search for Estoban's father. In Barcelona, she is constantly moving from one place to another, doing something or another for someone. Save a transsexual prostitute (Antonio San Juan) here, help a pregnant nun (Penelope Cruz) there. Help smooth out the turbulent lesbian relationship between two actresses (Marisa Paredes and Candela Pena) here, usher an older woman (Rosa Maria Sarda) into a great understanding of life there. She never stops.

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Deep Crimson Review


Good
Humanity has been attempting to explain evil since we climbed out of the sooty swamp water. From Balinese woodcarvings of gruesome crimes to modern 35mm Hollywood blockbusters about serial killers, we have a fascination with the darker side of life. It goes beyond myth, beyond religion and encompasses something innately human. Perhaps it has evolved from an animal instinct for protecting territory or securing a mate, whatever the impetus it has become a rampaging ship detached from its moorings. Violence assails out daily lives, and it's not just that the news is more prevalent than ever.

Many times violence is linked with politics, war, famine, natural disaster but sometimes it comes from nowhere and for no reason at all. This violence, the unexpected, the absurd, is most shocking. In her critical book Eichmann in Jerusalem, Hannah Arendt outlined her thesis of the "banality of evil" to explain how the Nazis could murder 6 million Jews. Arndt believed that the evil of the Nazis was a banality to suffering and death - the failure of humanity to buck the system, to challenge immorality. The excuse, "everyone else was doing it," made the crimes all the more hideous.

Continue reading: Deep Crimson Review

All About My Mother Review


Very Good
Director Pedro Almodovar explains the relationship between tunnels and the main character of Manuela (Cecila Roth) in All About My Mother with the line: "Manuela runs away. She always runs away on a train, through endless tunnels."

Indeed, Manuela is always moving. With the untimely death of her son, Estoban, she moves to Barcelona to embark upon a search for Estoban's father. In Barcelona, she is constantly moving from one place to another, doing something or another for someone. Save a transsexual prostitute (Antonio San Juan) here, help a pregnant nun (Penelope Cruz) there. Help smooth out the turbulent lesbian relationship between two actresses (Marisa Paredes and Candela Pena) here, usher an older woman (Rosa Maria Sarda) into a great understanding of life there. She never stops.

Continue reading: All About My Mother Review

The Flower Of My Secret Review


Excellent
I've never enjoyed chick flicks.

Films like Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason strike me as cinematic equivalents to crack pipe hits for girls. They are down and dirty, pass the goods, quick fixes. Most chick flicks aren't even romantic, unless your idea of romance is watching two people kiss, fight, and babble like infants. They hardly qualify as comedies, either; most are middling, sentimental and absurd. (Before the hate mail pours in, "guy" flicks are just as mindless: monotonous action, deus ex machina, T&A, and unremitting explosions. Neither is the victor in a contest for taste.) Good comedic romances, true romantic comedies, are very hard to come by. The Flower of My Secret is one of those rare romantic comedies that is both very romantic and quite funny.

Continue reading: The Flower Of My Secret Review

The Devil's Backbone Review


Very Good
Guillermo del Toro returns to Spanish-language thrillseeking with this creepfest, a period piece ghost story that often gets under your skin, though not quite with the same dramatic flair as Cronos. Del Toro puts the action at the end of the Spanish Civil War in 1939, plopping us at a remote orphanage in the desert countryside. The orphanage has bigger problems than Franco, however: There's gold hidden in them thar walls, an unexploded bomb in the courtyard, and a dead kid at the bottom of a pool. Throw into the mix some pickled fetuses (and one horrific scene where the old patriarch drinks some of the brine), and you're set up for a freakshow royale.

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Talk To Her Review


Good

Spanish auteur Pedro Amoldóvar has a special talent for making eccentrics feel accessible. His films are always populated, at least in part, by unusual characters (transvestites, bondage freaks, pregnant nuns) who are so fully developed as characters -- and as human beings -- that they seem no stranger than your next door neighbor.

In "Talk To Her," the director's central weirdo an awkward, obsessive, socially incongruous male nurse with a stalker's crush on a comatose patient. His name is Benigno (Javier Camara) and his intensely sheltered life of caring for his fake-invalid mother has not only compelled him toward this kind of imaginary, one-sided "relationship," it was also the catalyst for his obsession in the first place.

Benigno lived with his mother across the street from a dance studio where he first became dumbstruck by Alicia (Leonor Watling), watching her through the windows before a hit-and-run accident left her hospitalized and effectively brain-dead. Having taken correspondence courses in nursing to better care for the old woman -- who had since died and left him alone in the apartment from which he rarely ventured -- Benigno convinced the girl's father to hire him as her private nurse.

Continue reading: Talk To Her Review

The Devil's Backbone Review


OK

Sublimely atmospheric but erratically chilling, "The Devil's Backbone" is a promising Spanish spooker about a haunted orphanage, but it's too hung up on being more than just a ghost story.

Taking place during the Spanish Civil War, the film opens during a nighttime bombing raid in which a huge ordnance slams the building's courtyard but doesn't explode.

Months later when a war orphan named Carlos (Fernando Tielve) is abandoned at the remote, dilapidated institution, the rusting hulk of the bomb still sticks straight up out of the ground, looming over the day-to-day lives of the children and their caretakers.

Continue reading: The Devil's Backbone Review

Marisa Paredes

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Marisa Paredes Movies

The Skin I Live In Movie Review

The Skin I Live In Movie Review

With his bold, assured filmmaking style and heavy echoes of Hitchcock's Vertigo, Almodovar creates a...

The Skin I Live In Trailer

The Skin I Live In Trailer

Twelve years ago, plastic surgeon Dr Robert Ledgard's wife was burnt to death in a...

All About My Mother Movie Review

All About My Mother Movie Review

Director Pedro Almodovar explains the relationship between tunnels and the main character of Manuela (Cecila...

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All About My Mother Movie Review

All About My Mother Movie Review

Director Pedro Almodovar explains the relationship between tunnels and the main character of Manuela (Cecila...

Talk To Her Movie Review

Talk To Her Movie Review

Spanish auteur Pedro Amoldóvar has a special talent for making eccentrics feel accessible. His films...

All About My Mother Movie Review

All About My Mother Movie Review

Once you get past the fact that this movie takes place in a very Pedro...

The Devil's Backbone Movie Review

The Devil's Backbone Movie Review

Sublimely atmospheric but erratically chilling, "The Devil's Backbone" is a promising Spanish spooker about a...

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