Marina Sirtis

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Marina Sirtis - Premiere of 'Blunt Talk' held at the DGA Theater - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 10th August 2015

Marina Sirtis
Marina Sirtis
Marina Sirtis, Patrick Stewart and Levar Burton
Marina Sirtis, Patrick Stewart and Levar Burton

Marina Sirtis - Destination Star Trek event at ExCel London - Inside at Excell London - London, United Kingdom - Friday 3rd October 2014

Marina Sirtis
Jeri Ryan and Marina Sirtis
Jeri Ryan and Marina Sirtis
Jeri Ryan and Marina Sirtis
Marina Sirtis
Marina Sirtis

Marina Sirtis - Destination star Trek returns to London, Excel Centre, London, England, 03.10.14 - London, United Kingdom - Friday 3rd October 2014

Marina Sirtis
Jeri Ryan and Marina Sirtis
Marina Sirtis

Marina Sirtis and Saturn Awards Thursday 26th July 2012 The 2012

Marina Sirtis and Saturn Awards
Marina Sirtis and Saturn Awards
Marina Sirtis and Saturn Awards
Marina Sirtis and Saturn Awards
Marina Sirtis and Saturn Awards
Marina Sirtis and Saturn Awards

Marina Sirtis and Patrick Stewart - Marina Sirtis and Patrick Stewart Sunday 30th January 2011 at Screen Actors Guild Los Angeles, California

Marina Sirtis and Patrick Stewart

Star Trek: Nemesis Review


Bad
Long has held the rule that even-numbered Star Trek movies are good and odd-numbered ones are bad. I hereby propose a new rule be adopted: Say what you will about the odds and evens, but above all else, every fifth movie is utter crap.

Star Trek: Nemesis, the tenth (and God help us, the last) movie in the unstoppable Trek series, offers the thinnest story since Star Trek V took the previous crew to the center of the galaxy in search of God. But at least this one isn't saddled by metaphysical nonsense. All of that's out the shuttle bay doors in favor of good, old-fashioned idiocy, ripped from yesterday's headlines.

Continue reading: Star Trek: Nemesis Review

Star Trek: Generations Review


Good
The seventh Star Trek movie went where no man had gone before, at least not in Hollywood: Attempting to take an old and lethargic movie franchise and reinvigorate it with a new cast -- uniting both the original and new casts in one massive crossover movie.

Generations (having dispensed with the numbering of the sequels) is a fair enough film. It's massively contrived to be sure -- the Kirk-era cast and Picard-era cast were meant to be some 80 years apart -- but considering the difficulty of trying to combine two crews in one movie, Shatner & Stewart turned in a fair enough endeavor.

Continue reading: Star Trek: Generations Review

Star Trek: Insurrection Review


OK
By 1998, the Star Trek legacy was looking thin. The series had run through all of its big villains, Trek's cast was happily dabbling in other projects, and the memory of Kirk and co. had long since faded happily into the land of reruns.

But you can't keep Trek down, and the crew saddled up for this lackluster experience, the likes of which would typically comprise an hour-long episode of The Next Generation, and not even a season finale.

Continue reading: Star Trek: Insurrection Review

Star Trek: First Contact Review


Very Good
People tend to measure the quality of a Star Trek movie in relation to those near it in the cycle. Compared to episodes before (5 and 7) and those that followed (9 and 10), this eighth installment of the unkillable series is surprisingly watchable.

Jonthan "Riker" Frakes is at the helm this time, taking the Next Generation crew on its first mission without the original series cast. The setup comes fast, as Frakes trots out one of the series' most reliable villains: The Borg. Building from the mythology set up in the series, Picard (a former Borg captive) has a serious axe to grind, and when Starfleet ends up in a skirmish with an invading Borg ship, he defies orders and engages them in battle. The day is won, but an escape pod shoots from the ship, tunnels through time (stop rolling your eyes), and lands on earth. We see the effects immediately: The Borg has completely taken over the planet. The only sensible solution: Follow the Borg through the time hole and try to wipe 'em out in the past.

Continue reading: Star Trek: First Contact Review

Crash Review


Good
A meditation on the often unacknowledged undercurrentsof racism in everyday American city life, "Crash" has the kindof broad appeal that can draw large audiences and the kind of lingeringemotional potency that can lead to serious soul-searching.

An impressive ensemble cast lends strong character to acultural cross-section of Los Angeles denizens who are connected to eachother through crime, corruption, obligation, indignation and chance overa two-day period. The most powerful storyline features Matt Dillon andRyan Phillippe as beat cops -- one jaded and abusive, the other fresh andidealistic -- who pull over and harass (much to Phillippe's dismay) a blackyuppie couple (Terrence Howard and Thandie Newton) because the SUV they'redriving vaguely fits the description of a carjacked vehicle.

Within 24 hours, these characters all cross paths againin separate incidents of incredibly high tension that challenge both theprejudices that have formed between them and the conclusions we've beenled to as an audience.

Although they do not meet again, similarly potent table-turningand judgment-testing events occur in the lives of the actual carjackers(Larenz Tate and rapper Ludacris, whose character is ironically obsessedwith being stereotyped) and their victims, an ambitious district attorneyand his uptight wife (played with depth and conviction by Brendan Fraserand Sandra Bullock).

Continue reading: Crash Review

Star Trek: Nemesis Review


Weak

"Star Trek" films have always faced considerable scrutiny from their detail-oriented fans, so one would think by the 10th big screen outing the shepherds of the series would know better than to make a movie full of flubs.

Yet while "Star Trek: Nemesis" is a formidable, dignified sci-fi adventure when sticking to the substance of its story -- about a baneful young clone of Capt. Picard leading enemy aliens in battle against the starship Enterprise -- the picture grows decidedly flimsier with its many out-sized, out of character and logically porous action set pieces.

Take, for example, the silly dune buggy sequence in which Picard (Patrick Stewart), android Lt. Commander Data (Brent Spiner) and Klingon Lt. Commander Worf (Michael Dorn) go conspicuously gallivanting around the planet of a pre-warp civilization (a violation of Star Fleet's Prime Directive that goes completely unaddressed), being shot at by locals and staging daredevil stunts, a la "XXX."

Continue reading: Star Trek: Nemesis Review

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Star Trek: Nemesis Movie Review

Star Trek: Nemesis Movie Review

Long has held the rule that even-numbered Star Trek movies are good and odd-numbered ones...

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Crash Movie Review

Crash Movie Review

A meditation on the often unacknowledged undercurrentsof racism in everyday American city life, "Crash" has...

Star Trek: Nemesis Movie Review

Star Trek: Nemesis Movie Review

"Star Trek" films have always faced considerable scrutiny from their detail-oriented fans, so one would...

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