On Sunday 5th of August it will have been fifty years since one of the most famous faces of the 20th century, Marilyn Monroe, died of an apparent overdose. At just 36-years-old the death was a tragic and well-recorded event, with interest in the actress and her death still very much at a high.
As the half-century anniversary of the tragic event draws ever closer, shrouds of mystery are as thick as those over the records held by the FBI, with the unnecessary secrecy continuously fuelling the rumours that suspect number one for the murder of Monroe is in fact the US government.
The records kept on Monroe by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, which are many, have been a source of intrigue for many seeking to gain a closer insight on the film star and her death. However, even so long after her death, the files are still heavily censored. So much so that following a police investigation in 1988 by the Lapd, even they could not gain access into the files.
The Fbi, run by the often unstable J Edgar Hoover at the time, were keen to monitor the movements of Monroe, fearing that she could be used as a pawn by Communist conspirators during the highly paranoid time in American politics.
Still, it isn't unusual for the Fbi to keep their files well under wraps, as many archivists have found in the past. Until the day that the government finally allows full access to it's files then accounts that Monroe's death was murder will be nothing more that a conspiracy, and nothing else.