Marilyn Burns

Marilyn Burns

Marilyn Burns Quick Links

News Film RSS

The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) Review


OK
History, and memory, have been exceptionally kind to the original Texas Chain Saw Massacre (and yep, that's how they spelled "chain saw," as two words).

In our collective consciousness, Leatherface and his chainsaw have become as iconic as Freddy and his razors or Jason and his hockey mask. And it's all thanks to a goofy and only occasionally scary low-budget horror vehicle that started it all in 1974 (making Leatherface the ancient grandfather of his contemporaries). The story has been widely copied in the following decades: Hippie teens run out of gas and seek refuge at a backwater gas station; too bad a family of psychos are waiting in store for them. (In the last year alone this premise was copied nearly to the letter in both Wrong Turn and House of 1000 Corpses.) Over the years the film would spawn seven sequels or remakes (to date), including versions starring Dennis Hopper and Renee Zellweger.

Continue reading: The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) Review

Helter Skelter Review


OK
Ultra-freaky Steve Railsback steals the show as Charles Manson in the 4-hour miniseries that outlines the trial of Manson and his "family" for the Sharon Tate and LaBianca murders in the early 1970s. Unfortunately, about 2 1/2 hours of this is filler, padding out the story to miniseries length. DiCenzo is capable as the prosecutor who put Manson away for life (actually: he got the death penalty, but California overturned the death penalty while he was on death row; his sentence was converted to life in prison). But ultimately, this is Railsback's story -- the tricks he does with his eyes alone are unforgettable.

The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) Review


OK
History, and memory, have been exceptionally kind to the original Texas Chain Saw Massacre (and yep, that's how they spelled "chain saw," as two words).

In our collective consciousness, Leatherface and his chainsaw have become as iconic as Freddy and his razors or Jason and his hockey mask. And it's all thanks to a goofy and only occasionally scary low-budget horror vehicle that started it all in 1974 (making Leatherface the ancient grandfather of his contemporaries). The story has been widely copied in the following decades: Hippie teens run out of gas and seek refuge at a backwater gas station; too bad a family of psychos are waiting in store for them. (In the last year alone this premise was copied nearly to the letter in both Wrong Turn and House of 1000 Corpses.) Over the years the film would spawn seven sequels or remakes (to date), including versions starring Dennis Hopper and Renee Zellweger.

Continue reading: The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) Review

Boogeymen Review


OK
Just when you think there are no new ideas in Hollywood comes a DVD like Boogeymen, which shakes up your expectations of the movies. With the promise of giving you "the greatest hits of horror," Boogeymen is a compilation of scenes from 17 horror movies, ostensibly the best-known bits of the movies' "boogeymen" doing their dirtiest work.

Some of these boogeymen are the real deal -- Leatherface (The Texas Chainsaw Massacre) at the end of the film, Freddy Krueger (A Nightmare on Elm Street) in his finest hour, Jason (Friday the 13th) chasing a towel-wrapped co-ed, Pinhead (Hellraiser) ripping apart some dude. These are memorable horror baddies who haunted us during our youth. Then there are scenes from Wishmaster, Leprechaun, The Guardian, and even The Dentist -- not only is it not scary, it's silly and insulting to the other villains (like Psycho's Norman Bates) in the lineup. The Puppetmaster? And The Ugly? I've never even heard of The Ugly.

Continue reading: Boogeymen Review

Marilyn Burns

Marilyn Burns Quick Links

News Film RSS