Mariel Hemingway

Mariel Hemingway

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Guest at The Huffington Post

Mariel Hemingway - Guest at The Huffington Post - Manhattan, New York, United States - Monday 6th April 2015

Mariel Hemingway
Mariel Hemingway
Mariel Hemingway
Mariel Hemingway
Mariel Hemingway

Celebrities at LAX airport

Celebrities at LAX airport

Mariel Hemingway
Mariel Hemingway
Mariel Hemingway
Mariel Hemingway

71st Annual Golden Globe Awards - Arrivals

Mariel Hemingway - 71st Annual Golden Globe Awards held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Red Carpet Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 12th January 2014

Mariel Hemingway

Mariel Hemingway Curse Explored in Running From Crazy at Sundance


Mariel Hemingway Ernest Hemingway Barbara Kopple Oprah Winfrey

The Sundance Film Festival has become a hub for some of the world's best documentaries to be showcased. Mariel Hemingway, the grand-daughter of the iconic American writer Ernest Hemingway. Her family's history has been carved by depression and ill mental health. Running From Crazy explores that part of her family's history, and had its premier at the Sundance Film Festival. 

Ernest Hemingway killed himself two weeks before Mariel was born, one of her sisters died of an overdose in 1998 and her other sister has been in and out of institutions for a decade. Mariel herself has battled with depression but now, speaking to the Globe and Mail, she says she's through it. "Some people are like, 'Wow, [Running From Crazy is] a heavy title.' Well, I don't see it as a heavy title. I'm like, 'Dude, thank God.' Crazy's gone. . There's fun in my life and I'm joyful. But there was a time when I really was not. . But I truly am no longer depressed. It's gone. I can honestly say that it's been years. I laugh at myself now, which is fun." 

With Academy Award winner Barabara Kopple directing and Oprah Winfrey as executive producer it's got some heavy-weight backing behind it. Working with Mariel was a dream for Kopple. "What Mariel has, I mean, she's the dream of a documentarian," she said, "because you sit at the table with her and talk to her, and everything comes out, because she has a higher purpose for it. She really wants to shed light on suicide and mental illness."

The Golden Boys Review


Terrible
Daniel Adams' The Golden Boys has nothing to do with the Emmy-winning sitcom The Golden Girls (sorry, mom). In no way is it a masculine spin-off that replaces sassy-talking Bea Arthur, Betty White, and Rue McClanahan with Rip Torn, David Carradine, and Bruce Dern.

Yet there are similarities worth mentioning. Both rest on characters tolerating their "golden" years. And both offer television-sized entertainment.

Continue reading: The Golden Boys Review

Nanking Review


Excellent
Four years before Pearl Harbor, Japan was already on the march in China, grabbing territory in its quest for imperial expansion. After Shanghai fell, Japanese troops set their sights on Nanking, the capital of China at the time. It was just 160 miles up the Yangtze River.

The events later known as the rape of Nanking happened quickly, over just six horrific weeks at the end of 1937 and into 1938, and because the city was so cut off at the time and the war went on for eight more years, much of the story went untold for decades. It wasn't until writer Iris Chang documented the tragedy in her 1998 book The Rape of Nanking that the true scope of the horror was made apparent. It was that book that inspired Nanking, a highly effective documentary that uses interesting techniques to tell its remarkable story.

Continue reading: Nanking Review

Superman IV: The Quest for Peace Review


Unbearable
Christopher Reeve allegedly insisted that if he was going to slum his way through a fourth Superman movie, it would have to involve a story about nuclear disarmament. Noble, yes, but after Supe tosses all the nukes into the sun, Lex Luthor tosses token villain "Nuclear Man" (Mark Pillow, whose career was promptly killed after this debacle) into the mix. Pathetic battle, combined with the usual "hide that secret identity!" subplot, ensues. Worst of all are the special effects: I didn't think you could make an entire movie on a bluescreen in 1987, but damn if director Sidney J. Furie doesn't try. I've also never seen people falling sooo sloooooowlyyyyyyyyyy. Avoid!

The Sex Monster Review


Grim
Think 90 minutes of Dream On gone horribly awry. Mariel Hemingway as a sexy vixen with nascent bisexual tendencies? Maybe 20 years ago. Maybe. Never funny and insulting at times.

Continue reading: The Sex Monster Review

Superman IV: The Quest for Peace Review


Unbearable
Christopher Reeve allegedly insisted that if he was going to slum his way through a fourth Superman movie, it would have to involve a story about nuclear disarmament. Noble, yes, but after Supe tosses all the nukes into the sun, Lex Luthor tosses token villain "Nuclear Man" (Mark Pillow, whose career was promptly killed after this debacle) into the mix. Pathetic battle, combined with the usual "hide that secret identity!" subplot, ensues. Worst of all are the special effects: I didn't think you could make an entire movie on a bluescreen in 1987, but damn if director Sidney J. Furie doesn't try. I've also never seen people falling sooo sloooooowlyyyyyyyyyy. Avoid!

Manhattan Review


Good
After taking a fresh look at the DVD of Manhattan, it's apparent that this isn't Woody Allen's greatest film. However, it is easily his most beautiful, with breathtaking black & white vistas of the titular city set to Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue." Too bad Allen's lusty, pedophilic tale of lust (over Mariel Hemingway, no less) doesn't hold a candle to the scenery. Still, worth watching. The sound is optional.

Deconstructing Harry Review


Good
The Wood-man cometh, and he goes for broke this time.

Pretty much taking pot-shots at everyone he's ever known, every establishment he can think of, every vice there is, and--mostly--himself... that's your basic summary of Deconstructing Harry. Allen is vulgar and crass, wholly unlikeable... but hysterical. Maybe the funniest part of the film is the cast of stars he's lined up, all of whom do nothing but get spit upon the whole time! Suckers! (The movie is told half in reality, half as visualizations of writer Harry Block's (Allen) stories, thus, the large cast.)

Continue reading: Deconstructing Harry Review

See Arnold Run Review


OK
Originally made for A&E television, this is a visualization of the early career and later political leanings of Arnold Schwarzenegger, who was at the center of California's unprecedented and unbearably tacky 2003 Governer recall election.

Say what you will about the movie itself: The casting is either inspired or excruciating or both. J├╝rgen Prochnow as the older Schwarzenegger. Mariel Hemingway as Maria Shriver, and Nora Dunn as Ariana Huffington. Wow. Prochnow alone is terrifying: He doesn't really look much like Arnold (and he's about 120 pounds light), but they've done his hair up to make him look like a bizarro approximation of him. Hemingway and Dunn are equally disturbing: Hemingway lowers her voice an octave to play Shriver. Dunn sounds like she's been listening to Huffington on the radio for an hour, and this is her best approximation. I was disappointed that the producers didn't pull out a little guy to play Gary Coleman (who also ran for Governor) or get porn star Mary Carey to play herself.

Continue reading: See Arnold Run Review

The Contender Review


Grim

Writer-director Rod Lurie is to political thriller cinema what Jackie Collins is to romance novels: high-gloss trash. The difference is that Lurie takes himself seriously.

Earlier this year his preposterous nuclear countdown yarn "Deterrence" was released after sitting on a shelf for two years. It starred Kevin Pollack as a US president snowed in at a Colorado greasy spoon getting unsolicited advice from a peanut gallery of patrons as Saddam Hussein's son revealed a secret nuclear arsenal pointed at our shores. Even more ridiculous than the plot was the "just kidding" manner in which it concludes.

Now comes "The Contender," a lurid yet didactic gavel-to-gavel drama about a vice presidential appointee embroiled in a sex scandal.

Continue reading: The Contender Review

Mariel Hemingway

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