Maria De Medeiros

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Maria de Medeiros and The Legendary Tigerman performing at Optimus Alive! 2010 at Passeio Maritimo de Alges - Day 3 - Saturday 10th July 2010 at Optimus Alive! Lisborn, Portugal

Maria De Medeiros and The Legendary Tigerman Performing At Optimus Alive! 2010 At Passeio Maritimo De Alges - Day 3
Maria De Medeiros and The Legendary Tigerman Performing At Optimus Alive! 2010 At Passeio Maritimo De Alges - Day 3
Maria De Medeiros and The Legendary Tigerman Performing At Optimus Alive! 2010 At Passeio Maritimo De Alges - Day 3
Maria De Medeiros and The Legendary Tigerman Performing At Optimus Alive! 2010 At Passeio Maritimo De Alges - Day 3
Maria De Medeiros and The Legendary Tigerman Performing At Optimus Alive! 2010 At Passeio Maritimo De Alges - Day 3
Maria De Medeiros and The Legendary Tigerman Performing At Optimus Alive! 2010 At Passeio Maritimo De Alges - Day 3

The Saddest Music In The World Review


Excellent
The Saddest Music in the World starts off in the style of a dream, with impressionistic sets that are obviously stage props, grainy, low resolution black and white images obscured even further by fog or filtration, and stylized dialogue that seems more representational than real. But, about the time you expect the dreamer to awake and the film quality to revert to a slick 35mm normality, it doesn't. If this is a dream, or a vision, or the manifestation of a mind driven by mad storytelling technique, it's all part of the concept.

All of which seems to further 2003 as the year of the outlandish fantasy. As Sylvain Chomet's singular vision brought us a work derived purely from an irrepressibly inventive mind with The Triplets of Belleville, here Canadian director Guy Maddin (Dracula: Pages from a Virgin's Diary, Fleshpots of Antiquity) works from a co-authored original screenplay with Kazuo Ishiguro (The Remains of the Day) in a manner that combines the storytelling and musical vitality of Topsy-Turvy with the visual imagery out of the German expressionism of F.W. Murnau (Nosferatu, The Phantom) but with its own richness of character. I call it "high concept 8mm."

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My Life Without Me Review


Weak
Focusing an entire dramatic film on death can be tricky. Death drives an enormous range of emotions, from fear to sadness, to curiosity; yet, most movies treat death with overwrought nobility, excessive weepiness, or yikes, both (see: Pay It Forward). Spanish director Isabel Coixet's first English-language feature suffers from the first sin, treating a young women's impending death with a stagy aloofness that cheats the film of more complex emotions.

The unfortunate woman is 24-year-old Ann (the always appealing Sarah Polley), a struggling wife and mother who learns that a raging cancer will kill her in just a few months. Ann's initial response is to hide the news from her mother (Deborah Harry); very matter-of-factly, she continues to follow that M.O. by telling no one, including her husband Don (Scott Speedman, grinning way too much).

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Pulp Fiction Review


Essential
Royale with cheese, baby, royale with cheese. The film of that single-handedly changed the face of American -- and world -- cinema in 1994, Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction is a rare masterpiece that is unlikely to be repeated by him, or his imitators. And believe me, many have tried, with varying levels of success.

This set of interlocking tales involving gangsters, boxers, druggies, and plain old joes is alternately exciting and funny -- and often both at the same time. Whether it's John Travolta's Vincent Vega doing the twist with his gangster boss's wife and later miraculously pulling her out of a drug overdose, Samuel L. Jackson reciting the Bible or picking splattered brain out of his enormous afro, Tim Roth and Amanda Plummer robbing a diner, Bruce Willis throwing a boxing match and later ending up facing a couple of oversexed hillbilly degenerates, or Ving Rhames overseeing the whole proceedings, the movie is utterly brilliant, hilarious, and thrilling. Even the little things are perfect: Tarantino has never since quite managed to recapture his masterful use of the close-up and fantastically interesting lighting choices. It's one of only a handful of films that gets better every time you watch it.

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THE SADDEST MUSIC IN THE WORLD Review


Excellent

Canadian filmmaker Guy Maddin is often compared to David Lynch. In reality, his influences hail from decades long gone: from the silent-era Germans and the early Hollywood pioneers. His exuberant, expressionistic 2000 short film "The Heart of the World," made for the Toronto Film Festival, was rightly hailed as a mini-masterwork, and now here he is with a new feature film that captures some of that magic once again.

"The Saddest Music in the World" takes place in 1933 Winnipeg. A wealthy beer baroness, Lady Port-Huntly (Isabella Rossellini) is the only one making a decent living; everyone wants to drink their sorrows away. To boost business she announces a contest to determine the saddest music in the world. Each of the world's countries may enter once, and so an estranged father and two sons from far corners of the globe reunite for the contest.

The father, Fyodor (David Fox), represents Canada, the happy-go-lucky Broadway producer Chester Kent (Mark McKinney) represents America and Roderick (Ross McMillan) represents Serbia. The woeful Roderick is a world-renowned cellist who mourns his dead child and his lost wife, Narcissa (Maria de Medeiros), who is now dating Chester. Chester champions the vulgar side of America, the urge to make everything big and bright with little regard for anyone else's feelings.

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Benedict Cumberbatch Interviews Tom Hiddleston, But Avoids The Taylor Swift Question

Benedict Cumberbatch Interviews Tom Hiddleston, But Avoids The Taylor Swift Question

One Marvel Universe star interviewed another, as part of Interview magazine's October edition.

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Maria de Medeiros Movies

The Saddest Music in the World Movie Review

The Saddest Music in the World Movie Review

The Saddest Music in the World starts off in the style of a dream, with...

My Life Without Me Movie Review

My Life Without Me Movie Review

Focusing an entire dramatic film on death can be tricky. Death drives an enormous range...

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Pulp Fiction Movie Review

Pulp Fiction Movie Review

Royale with cheese, baby, royale with cheese. The film of that single-handedly changed the...

THE SADDEST MUSIC IN THE WORLD Movie Review

THE SADDEST MUSIC IN THE WORLD Movie Review

Canadian filmmaker Guy Maddin is often compared to David Lynch. In reality, his influences hail...

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