Margaret Cho

Margaret Cho

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'Tooken' premiere

Margaret Cho - 'Tooken' premiere at LAEMMLE NoHo 7 Theater - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 20th May 2015

Reno Wilson and Margaret Cho

Benedict Cumberbatch's Globes Photobomb: The Oscar Selfie of 2015


Benedict Cumberbatch Meryl Streep Margaret Cho Michael Keaton Amy Poehler Golden Globe Awards

These days, it’s not an award show without an official selfie or photobomb or whatever image-related bandwagon Hollywood is hopping on that week. I’m talking, of course, about Benedict Cumberbatch, that painstaking “penguin” pronouncing pun producing pharaoh of the internet (feel free to pitch in a synonym starting with “p”).

Benedict Cumberbatch
Benedict Cumberbatch: the most awkward Brit in showbiz?

Here’s the backstory. Displaying the typical Hollywood amount of cultural sensitivity, hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler were doing a bit on North Korea. Meanwhile, Meryl Streep was posing for a photo-op with an in-disguise Margaret Cho. Oh, and guess who was behind the camera? A treat for older viewers – it was Michael Keaton. It kind of begs the question - is BC's photobomb this year's Oscars selfie?

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The L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center's Annual "An Evening with Women" Show

LuAnn Boylan, Margaret Cho and Linda Perry - The L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center's Annual "An Evening with Women" Show at The Beverly Hilton - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Sunday 11th May 2014

Margaret Cho and Rumer Willis
Margaret Cho and Rumer Willis
Margaret Cho, Rumer Willis and Linda Perry
Margaret Cho and Rumer Willis
Margaret Cho

The L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center's Annual "An Evening with Women"

Linda Perry, Evan Rachel Wood and Margaret Cho - The L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center's Annual "An Evening with Women" at The Beverly Hilton - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Sunday 11th May 2014

Linda Perry
Sara Gilbert and Linda Perry
Linda Perry
Sara Gilbert and Linda Perry
Sia, Sara Gilbert and Linda Perry

Margaret Cho - Whimsy, Raunchy and Silly (Interview)


Margaret Cho - Tattoo Stories (Interview)


Margaret Cho - No Joke (Interview)


Face/off Review


Excellent
It's hard to remember the whooshing sighs of disappointment from his fans that greeted John Woo in 1996 when, after so many half-steps and mis-starts, he made his big Hollywood debut with the stolen-nuke thriller Broken Arrow. Having left the Hong Kong business on a high with 1992's psychotic near-parody Hard Boiled, Woo did a Jean-Claude Van Damme flick -- 1993's Hard Target, which was heavily botched by studio interference but still contained some brilliant work -- before deciding to go seriously Hollywood. For Broken Arrow, he toned down his trademark mix of ultra-violent flourishes and teary-eyed humanism to concentrate on doing a by-the-book mid-'90s action flick that was generic in the extreme but raked in the money. The next year, though, Woo proved it had all just been an extraordinarily canny maneuver to allow him to make Face/Off, possibly the greatest, and definitely the most exuberant, action film to come out of the studio system in that decade.

A schizoid doppelganger mind-bender wrapped around your standard ticking-bomb scenario (it's hidden somewhere in Los Angeles and could take out the whole basin if detonated -- or something), Face/Off is an utterly lunatic film in the best possible way. Originally a futuristic thriller, the script was retooled for a modern-day setting, keeping several of its sci-fi elements but focusing more intently on its personality-shifting aspects which seemed to come straight out of Woo's international breakthrough, The Killer. An FBI agent, Sean Archer (John Travolta) has been hunting jet-set super-criminal Castor Troy (Nicolas Cage) for years. For Archer, it's gone beyond personal to haunted obsession, particularly after Troy tried to shoot Archer but missed and killed his son instead. After a gonzo opening sequence involving a Humvee/private jet showdown on a runway and about ten thousand expended rounds (mostly fired by people flying sideways in slo-mo, of course), Archer's team brings down Troy.

Continue reading: Face/off Review

Bam Bam And Celeste Review


Terrible
Bam Bam and Celeste strains to be funny. Even the title: Bam Bam? Celeste? That's a title that's trying to be amusing but isn't. You can tell writer/star Margaret Cho is working hard to generate laughs with this vanity project, but you'll have to be a lifetime member of the loyal Cho army to enjoy this low-rent road picture.

When we first meet Celeste (Cho), she's miserable in her '80s-era Illinois high school. As the only overweight Asian goth-punk in school, she's destined to feel like an outsider. Her only friend is the flamboyantly gay Bam Bam (Bruce Daniels), with whom she plans to make a great escape to the big city.

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It's My Party Review


Excellent
Like the outstanding Longtime Companion, Randal Kleiser's It's My Party shows what happens as AIDS rips apart a tight-knit circle of friends both gay and straight. The disease is claiming the life of the leader of their pack, a charismatic architect named Nick (Eric Roberts), and the experience is life-changing for all who know him.

Given just a few days to live (a rather contrived Dark Victory-style setup but one that is apparently based on a true story), Nick decides to commit suicide rather than suffer at the end the way so many of his AIDS-afflicted friends have. But before he goes, he decides to throw a two-day party to which he will invite all his friends, hand out parting gifts, and say goodbye with laughs and drinks rather than with tears and sadness.

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Margaret Cho: Assassin Review


Terrible
Divas do not, as a rule, make good comedians. Unfortunately, Margaret Cho loves loves loves divas, and not only that, seems intent on being one, coasting on the good will earned earlier in her career.

Taped at a May 14, 2005 concert in Washington, D.C., Margaret Cho: Assassin starts off like her 2000 film I'm the One That I Want with a parade of gushing fans, then segueing into the show itself, but unlike that much more ambitious effort, this film shows a comic treading water. Like many other performers in recent years, George W. Bush's presidency has spurred Cho to cover more political matters, usually a deadly development with comics. Although Cho has always been admirably outspoken in her support of gay and feminist causes, this change of focus to red-blue state matters leaves Assassin dead on arrival. The problem with Cho's tirades on Bush and the Christian right is not her choice of target - they're obviously subjects rife with possibility - but rather her inability to say anything remotely fresh or cutting about them. Bush is stupid? Check. The pro-life right is hypocritical on Terri Schiavo? Check. There is hardly a politically-targeted line in this show which has not already been uttered many times before, and by less talented people; it's like catching a second-rate rerun of The Daily Show.

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I'm the One That I Want Review


OK
Margaret Cho's comedy -- self-obsessed mockery about being Korean, being a "fag hag," her failed sitcom, her weight, and her mother -- has never been short on raunch and giggles. But her lengthy one-woman show, taped at the Warfield in San Francisco, is awfully repetitious, including a six-or-seven-minute bit about a frightening woman who arrives to "wash her vagina." If you're in love with Cho (as she is with herself), you'll eat her feature film up. If you're just a fan of comedy, you'll find her jokes sometimes funny... but often flatter than Friday night family sitcoms (and her self-pitying/depressive/"I'm a failure" moments are just awful).

Notorious C.H.O. Review


OK
Some theatrical performances don't transfer well to film, and this isn't taking fictional adaptation into account. There's an immediacy to watching a live show that adds energy to your response that, when separated by a screen and camera controlling what your eyes see, pales the material presented, no matter what it is. First case in point being The Vagina Monologues (as taped for HBO).

Such is the case with Notorious C.H.O., Margaret Cho's follow-up to the successful I'm the One That I Want. A comedienne with chutzpah and natural sense of comic timing, Cho can provoke laughter through the most overused humor, while the camera operators switch between continuously unmotivated angles in the hopes that your eyes won't get too bored. Maybe if you have access to several cameras you should use them regardless, but if a film keeps cutting between lenses without purpose, attention span will drop to zero.

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Margaret Cho

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