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Fifty Shades Darker Trailer


When Ana and Christian had their first fateful meeting, neither party knew much about the real person they were meeting. Christian didn't know just how naive Ana really was and Ana didn't quite understand just how dark Christian's thoughts ran. Though from completely different backgrounds and living entirely different lives, the pair were attracted to one another and they began a relationship - one mainly brought about after Christian seducing Ana, his latest younger woman. As dark secrets were uncovered, it became known to Ana that Christian was into BDSM. Still wishing to go ahead with the relationship, Ana finds out just how far Christian is willing to go to get his thrills but realises that she can't be with a man who inflicts that level of pain on someone they care about.

Time passes, Christian continues with his business lifestyle and Ana starts a new job at a publishing house and the former lovers reunite whilst at an exhibition of photography put on by one of Ana's friends. Christian begins to realise that his feelings for Ana run deeper than the usual dominant / submissive roles that usually define his relationships. With Ana now setting the rules, the pair begin a true relationship but as stories about Christian's past are revealed and Ana is introduced to some of the women that involve his past, neither party know exactly how they'll make their relationship work without sacrificing certain aspects.

Jamie Dornan and Dakota Johnson reprise their roles as Christian and Ana respectively. Kim Basinger is introduced to the plot as Elena Lincoln a lady Ana nicknames Mrs. Robinson after learning that she seduced Christian whilst still of a young age. Whilst Rookie Blue actor Eric Johnson is cast as Jack Hyde and Bella Heathcote as Leila Williams.

Get A Job Trailer


Will and Jillian are in love and both have recently graduated collage. Jillian managed to get a well-paid and high profile just almost instantly, Will on the other hand is still interning at companies for free but Will's luck is about to change (or so he thinks). He's just been offered a paid position at LA Weekly but when he turns up for work he's abruptly informed that the job position is no longer available because of downsizing. 

Will lives with his pot loving buddies who are all really close but some might be on the verge of being called 'deadbeats'. Will and his friends are all in a similar position, they 'really struggling to find a job, Jillian is the only structured part of his life. 

Needs must means Will must sell his beloved TV but things start to look up for the graduate when, against the odds, he's offered a job as a videographer. Just as Will gets into the swing at his new office Jillian finds herself jobless. Will is quick to encourage Jillian to get straight back out there but she finds herself with little luck. 

Continue: Get A Job Trailer

Grandma Review

Excellent

The fabulous Lily Tomlin finally gets the lead role she deserves in this smart, engaging comedy-drama. Like her title character, the film itself refuses to play nice, tackling big issues like abortion and the strain between mothers and daughters without ever simplifying the topics or the people involved. The plot may feel a bit contrived, and the entire movie rather lightweight, but it's thoroughly entertaining. And the subtle approach to the big themes gives it a strong kick.

Tomlin plays Elle, a mature woman who has just broken up with her girlfriend Olivia (Judy Greer) for no real reason. Then her young granddaughter Sage (Julia Garner) turns up asking for money to terminate her pregnancy. Elle doesn't have the cash, but offers to help her find it, so they head off into Los Angeles in her rattling 1955 Dodge, visiting the unborn baby's stoner father (Nat Wolff) and some of Elle's colourful old friends (Elizabeth Pena, Laverne Cox and Sam Elliott). But both Elle and Sage are terrified that they might ultimately need to get in contact with Sage's workaholic mother Judy (Marcia Gay Harden), the daughter Elle never knew how to talk to.

The layers of mother-daughter interaction in this film are fascinating, and played with riotously jagged chemistry by the gifted cast. Tomlin punches every witty one-liner perfectly, capturing Elle's life-loving spirit and also her weary exhaustion at the way the world keeps changing around her. Tomlin finds terrific angles in each of Elle's relationships, drawing out Garner's wide-eyed yearning, Greer's steeliness and Harden's professional bluster. Each of the side roles feels like a fully formed person with a life of his or her own, which gives context to the humour and makes the entire film feel more weighty and meaningful.

Continue reading: Grandma Review

Marcia Gay Harden - Celebrities attend People's Choice Awards 2016 Press Conference at The Paley Center for Media. at The Paley Center for Media, People's Choice Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 3rd November 2015

Marcia Gay Harden
Marcia Gay Harden, Jane Lynch, Cristina Milan, Ming-na Wen, Betsy Brandt and Abigail Spencer
Marcia Gay Harden, Jane Lynch, Cristina Milan, Ming-na Wen, Betsy Brandt and Abigail Spencer
Marcia Gay Harden, Jane Lynch, Cristina Milan, Ming-na Wen, Betsy Brandt and Abigail Spencer
Marcia Gay Harden, Jane Lynch, Cristina Milan, Ming-na Wen, Betsy Brandt and Abigail Spencer
Marcia Gay Harden, Jane Lynch, Cristina Milan, Ming-na Wen, Betsy Brandt and Abigail Spencer

Marcia Gay Harden, Jane Lynch, Christina Milian, Ming-Na Wen, Betsy Brandt , Abigail Spencer - People's Choice Awards Nominations 2016 held at the Paley Center for Media in Beverly Hills at Paley Center for Media, People's Choice Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 3rd November 2015

Marcia Gay Harden, Jane Lynch, Christina Milian, Ming-na Wen, Betsy Brandt and Abigail Spencer

Marcia Gay Harden - People's Choice Awards Nominations 2016 held at the Paley Center for Media in Beverly Hills at Paley Center for Media, People's Choice Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 3rd November 2015

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Marcia Gay Harden, Jane Lynch, Christina Milian, Ming-na Wen, Betsy Brandt and Abigail Spencer
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Marcia Gay Harden - HBO's Official 2015 Emmy After Party at Pacific Design Center - West Hollywood, California, United States - Sunday 20th September 2015

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Marcia Gay Harden - Face Forward's 6th Annual 'Moulin Rouge' Inspired Gala - Arrivals at Millennium Biltmore Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 19th September 2015

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Marcia Gay Harden
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Bonnie Summerville, Luis Guzman, Marcia Gay Harden and Benjamin Hollingsworth
Bonnie Summerville, Luis Guzman, Marcia Gay Harden and Benjamin Hollingsworth
Bonnie Summerville, Luis Guzman, Marcia Gay Harden and Benjamin Hollingsworth

Marcia Gay Harden - Face Forward's 6th Annual Moulin Rouge inspired Gala - Arrivals at Millennium Biltmore Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 20th September 2015

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Marcia Gay Harden - 2015 Entertainment Weekly Pre-Emmy Party at Fig & Olive Melrose Place - Arrivals at Fig & Olive - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 18th September 2015

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Marcia Gay Harden - CBS, CW And Showtime 2015 Summer TCA Party at Pacific Design Center - Arrivals at Pacific Design Center - West Hollywood, California, United States - Tuesday 11th August 2015

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Marcia Gay Harden

Raza Jaffrey , Marcia Gay Harden - The CBS, The CW, and Showtime 2015 Summer TCA Party at Pacific Design Center - Arrivals at Pacific Design Center - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 10th August 2015

Raza Jaffrey and Marcia Gay Harden

Marcia Gay Harden - CBS TCA Summer 2015 Party at Pacific Design Center - West Hollywood, California, United States - Tuesday 11th August 2015

Marcia Gay Harden

Marcia Gay Harden - Celebrities attend the CBS, The CW, and Showtime 2015 Summer TCA Party at Pacific Design Center. at Pacific Design Center - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 11th August 2015

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Marcia Gay Harden - 'How To Get Away With Murder' ATAS event held at Sunset Gower Studios - Arrivals at gower studios - Hollywood, California, United States - Thursday 28th May 2015

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Harry Ford, Marcia Gay Harden, William Allen Young, Bonnie Sommerville and Ben Hollingsworth - CBS Summer Soiree at London Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 18th May 2015

Harry Ford, Marcia Gay Harden, William Allen Young, Bonnie Sommerville and Ben Hollingsworth
Harry Ford, Marcia Gay Harden, William Allen Young, Bonnie Sommerville and Ben Hollingsworth
Harry Ford, Marcia Gay Harden, William Allen Young, Bonnie Sommerville and Ben Hollingsworth
Marcia Gay Harden and Bonnie Sommerville
Marcia Gay Harden and Bonnie Sommerville

Harry Ford, Marcia Gay Harden, William Allen Young, Bonnie Somerville and Ben Hollingsworth - A host of stars were snapped as they attended the 3rd Annual CBS Television Studios Rooftop Summer Soiree which was held at the London Hotel in West Hollywood, California, United States - Tuesday 19th May 2015

Harry Ford, Marcia Gay Harden, William Allen Young, Bonnie Somerville and Ben Hollingsworth
Harry Ford, Marcia Gay Harden, William Allen Young, Bonnie Somerville and Ben Hollingsworth
Marcia Gay Harden and Bonnie Somerville
Marcia Gay Harden and Bonnie Somerville
Marcia Gay Harden and Bonnie Somerville
Marcia Gay Harden and Bonnie Somerville

Marcia Gay Harden and Bonnie Somerville - Celebrities attend the 3rd Annual CBS Television Studios Rooftop Summer Soiree at The London Hotel. at The London Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 19th May 2015

Marcia Gay Harden and Bonnie Somerville
Marcia Gay Harden and Bonnie Somerville
Marcia Gay Harden and Bonnie Somerville
Marcia Gay Harden and Bonnie Somerville
Marcia Gay Harden and Bonnie Somerville
Marcia Gay Harden and Bonnie Somerville

Parkland - Clips


On November 22nd 1963 in Dallas, Texas, the hugely adored President John F. Kennedy was shot to death as he arrived in the city with First Lady Jackie Kennedy. A women's clothing manufacturer named Abraham Zapruder had no idea of the events that would unfold as he set up his camera preparing for Kennedy's arrival; no idea that his footage would be seen by millions repeatedly as the only visual evidence for what took place that day. Few people know anything about this man, or indeed the other people who ended up becoming involved in this historic tragedy, such as the doctors and nurses who were forced to perform immediate life-saving attempts even with their initial shock and devastation, and the family of alleged killer US Marine Lee Harvey Oswald.

This historical drama tells the stories of the lesser known figures who became involved with one of the most famous assassinations in the history of the world ahead its 50th anniversary. It has been directed and written by Peter Landesman who is best known for his sex slavery article 'The Girls Next Door' which was published in the New York Times. 'Parkland' will be released in UK theatres on November 8th 2013.

Click here to read: Parkland Movie Review

Video - Russell Crowe And RZA Pose Together At The World Premiere Of 'Man Of Steel' - Part 1


'Gladiator' star Russell Crowe, who plays Superman's biological father in 'Man Of Steel', was spotted posing next to rapper RZA at the movie's world premiere at Alice Tully Hall at the Lincoln Center in New York City. The movie's composer Hans Zimmer, and two other stars, Antje Traue and Christopher Meloni, also made appearances.

Continue: Video - Russell Crowe And RZA Pose Together At The World Premiere Of 'Man Of Steel' - Part 1

Detachment Review


Good
An almost overpowering sense of hopelessness makes this education-system drama difficult to watch. Fortunately, it's directed and acted with enough sensitivity to stir our sympathies. Although we're not sure we want to go wherever this bleak story might be heading.

Henry (Brody) takes a month-long assignment teaching at a tough school run by beleaguered principal Carol (Harden). Unflappable in the face of the unruly students, he calmly tries to get through to the teens. He clicks with fellow teacher Sarah (Hendricks). As a substitute, Henry's job is to maintain order, which seems like an impossible challenge. So he instead reaches out to a teen hooker (Gayle), thinking he might actually be able to make a difference in her life. But he can't help but wonder if he's doing more harm than good.

Continue reading: Detachment Review

Detachment Trailer


Henry Barthes is a highly recommended substitute teacher, a compliment he doesn't really accept. His latest job is subbing at an inner city high school for a month, where exam grades are slipping; the pupils are unruly and the head teacher is under fire for the decline in standards there.

Continue: Detachment Trailer

Whip It Review


Excellent
Hugely openhearted and packed with terrific moments that are both spiky and resonant, this undemanding coming-of-age comedy is sharply put together with a bright cast and genuinely infectious energy.

In Bodeen, Texas, Bliss (Page) is the rebellious teen daughter of a proud society mom (Harden) and a laid-back, beer-loving dad (Stern). Then with her best pal (Shawkat) she discovers the roller derby in Austin, where her surprisingly strong audition catches the notice of the coach (Wilson) as well as the stars (including accident-prone Barrymore, wacky Wiig, sassy Eve and tough-girl Bell). Renamed Babe Ruthless, she joins the Hurl Scouts team, discovering that some things are more important than beating their archrivals for the championship, the Holy Rollers (led by Lewis).

Continue reading: Whip It Review

Whip It Trailer


Watch the trailer for Whip It

Continue: Whip It Trailer

The Mist Review


Excellent
If I didn't know better, judging by the title, I'd say a new horror film called The Mist might just be a throwback to the campy slasher flicks of the early 1980s. It sounds suspiciously like a new name for yet another remake of John Carpenter's classic, The Fog. Well, The Mist is neither cheesy nor remade. In fact, it's a very simple title for a complex and intriguing tale that's more about humanity than a bunch of monsters.

Based on a novella by Stephen King, the worst electrical storm on record has a small coastal Maine town assessing the damages to their homes and businesses. Locals have flocked to the town's only grocery store to stock up on supplies while police, fire, and military personnel blanket the surrounding area. As a result of the storm, everything is out -- power, phones, and radios; the town is cut-off from the rest of the world. Oh, and the storm has also left behind an ominous mist that quickly shrouds the town, trapping those inside the grocery store when it appears that bloodthirsty, inhuman monsters are lurking outside.

Continue reading: The Mist Review

Into The Wild Review


Very Good
One day, you just pack up your essentials in a backpack, do away with all forms of identification, and set off on the road to find that piece of blue sky that's been missing from your puzzle. Such is the task taken on by young Chris McCandless (Emile Hirsch) when he set out in the summer of 1990 hoping to reach the blustery ether of Alaska. Abandoning a life of charm, money, and an equally rebellious sister (Jena Malone), McCandless walked, hitched, and explored America for two years before he died from starvation and partial poisoning on the outskirts of Denali National Park in Alaska.

Four years later, Outside magazine contributor Jon Krakauer documented McCandless' travels in his debut novel Into the Wild, which serves as a blueprint for Sean Penn's adaptation of McCandless' life. Look at me cross-eyed all you want but this tale of "a rebellious 1990s Thoreau" (as the press notes ponder he might be) brings out a buoyancy in director and terminal humbug Penn that's been absent in his filmography thus far. One might think Penn would be more apt to adapt Krakauer's recent Under the Banner of Heaven instead, but his direction in Wild is astute and brisk though not always as concise as one would hope.

Continue reading: Into The Wild Review

The Invisible Review


Good
The trailers for The Invisible ask, "How do you solve a murder when the victim is you?" This indeed poses several mysteries, but not the ones the trailer-makers have in mind. First, there's the question of whether the question is grammatically correct (the answer: maybe, but it sure sounds awkward). Then there's the mystery not of how to solve said murder, but where exactly the difficulty lies when you is -- er, are that murder victim. High-school senior Nick Powell, this film's victim, pretty much "solves" his murder while he's being killed (or near-killed); he recognizes and even converses with his assailants. Case closed.

Except that he's dead, of course, but assuming, as The Invisible does, the existence of a rather flexible netherworld between living and death, filling in further details isn't a problem either. When Nick wakes up as a sort of half-ghost, traveling through the land of the living without the ability to be seen or heard while his body lies on the brink of death, his detective skills need only to consist of following the murderers around, overhearing their motivations.

Continue reading: The Invisible Review

The Hoax Review


Very Good
Everybody loves a good con artist, a guy who can bluff his way into or out of anything. He's isn't violent, not a gangster, but a smooth-talking charmer whose poker face doesn't flinch no matter how dangerous or delicate the situation gets. Lasse Hallström's latest, The Hoax, offers a portrait of such a con artist, a real-life fabulist who makes James Frey (the disgraced "non-fiction" writer behind 2003's A Million Little Pieces) and his shenanigans look like chump change.

Richard Gere, perfectly cast, plays Clifford Irving, a down-and-out writer who in 1971 wrote (and nearly got published) a fake biography of Howard Hughes. Desperate to jump-start his career, Irving duped his editor Andrea Tate (Hope Davis) and the top dogs at McGraw-Hill into believing he was not only a friend of Hughes, the notorious recluse, but that the billionaire had tapped Irving to write his life story. Smelling a publishing sensation, McGraw-Hill offered Irving a then-record publishing deal, and the writer suddenly found himself the crown prince of the publishing world.

Continue reading: The Hoax Review

The Dead Girl Review


Very Good
With her debut feature Blue Car, Karen Moncrieff zeroed in on a troubled adolescent girl and a relationship with her favorite teacher; the film had the focus of a short story (a mixed blessing for a feature film). In The Dead Girl, her scope widens but that sharpness remains. The girl of the title is found in a field, and Moncrieff spends time with four women affected by her death: Arden (Toni Collette), who finds the body; the morgue attendant/student (Rose Byrne) who receives it next; Ruth (Mary Beth Hurt), the wife of a man who may know more about the death than he lets on; and a mother (Marcia Gay Harden) in town to identify a body.

Following these sideline characters, the screenplay circles the girl herself, a prostitute played by Brittany Murphy in a final, haunting segment. This structure eschews typical ensemble payoffs -- only a few of the characters intersect and they sure as hell don't learn valuable lessons from each other -- for its own subtle rewards. These narrative threads, never running over 20 minutes, are as close to short fiction as Blue Car, but the new film also has the unity of a fine, slim story collection.

Continue reading: The Dead Girl Review

American Gun (2005) Review


Good
Columbine was only seven years ago and already I'm sick to death of movies inspired by it. I don't mean to be insensitive, but seriously. How many movies can be made about American gun culture? When mixed with hormonal and impressionable kids, nothing good can happen, and tragedies occur. This we understand.

The good news is that Aric Avelino has at least one brilliant spin on the tale in the ensemble piece American Gun, which tracks a handful of characters in the wake of a Columbinian tragedy. The brilliance? Making one of the main characters the single mother of the (now deceased) shooter. Now trying to cope in the same community, and trying to raise another son with less violent tendencies, she doesn't have the cash to leave and, as expected, finds himself surrounded by hate. Played by Marcia Gay Harden, the addled mother is trying to figure out how her son could have done such a thing, while facing the exact same question from the people that surround her. It's the highlight of the film, a searing portrait of humanity and society at its worst.

Continue reading: American Gun (2005) Review

American Dreamz Review


Weak
There's a peculiarly painful sensation one gets when witnessing a comedy build toward its big moment, having carefully laid all out all the correct elements and primed you for all the gags as it leads up to the orchestrated finale and then... Just. Doesn't. Get. There. You get that feeling quite a lot in Paul Weitz's American Dreamz, about an American Idol-like reality show which becomes the linchpin in a dangerously rickety skit about wannabe celebrities, and yes, the war on terror (because one must be relevant). There's another feeling one gets, and it comes from that oft-ignored voice in the back of your head, the one that says, Hey, maybe we shouldn't be laughing at this, even if it was funny.What are we supposed to make of this queasy and uncertain concoction that lands a few weak punches and then dances safely back out of range? Weitz is no Wilder, but he's done better than most in comedy. American Pie may have brought us an unfortunate amount of Chris Klein, and In Good Company was hardly a beacon of originality, but they both possessed a refreshing amount of heart; while About a Boy proved that Hugh Grant's louche side is his best one. These were all films of modest means that succeeded beyond their stated intent. With American Dreamz, writer/director Weitz not only bites off more than he can chew, he (not to mention we) can barely get his mouth around the thing.The constellation of players include: Britney-like Ohioan pop striver Sally Kendoo (Mandy Moore), Simon Cowell-esque host Martin Tweed (Hugh Grant), a president and vice-president (Dennis Quaid and Willem Dafoe) who just may resemble a pair currently in power over there in D.C., and Omer (Sam Golzari), a clumsy, showtunes-loving terrorist (you read that right) who accidentally gets on the show after being sent to join a sleeper cell in Orange County. There's also Sally's sweet but dumb-as-rocks boyfriend William Williams (Chris Klein), who runs off to the army after she dumps him, and Omer's flaming-gay cousin Iqbal (Tony Yalda) who thinks he deserves to be on the show, and a number of fine performers like Shohreh Aghdashloo, Judy Greer, and John Cho wasted in dead-end roles. With all this at hand, Weiss aims to plug into some sort of vein of current American irreality, juxtaposing the fanatic public adulation of this TV show with the grinding presence of the war and the terrorist threat, but ends up splashing them all with the same cartoonish colors and scoring only the easiest of points.There is ample opportunity here, it's just not utilized. Quaid plays his Bush stand-in with ardent vigor as a decent but none-too-bright man who wakes up the day after his reelection and announces to his stunned manservant, "I'm going to read the newspaper." Cut to weeks later and the president bedroom is thick with papers and books, the commander in chief's head dangerously expanding, saying incredulously to his Cheney-like VP (Dafoe, mixing just the right amount of malice and buffoonery), "Did you know there were three different kinds of Iraqistanis?" But then this line of broad mockery is abandoned for a "Terrorist Training Camp" in some California desert masquerading as the generic Middle East, where Omer - who became a terrorist because his mom was killed by an American bomb; funny, that - dances to showtunes in his tent. Then it switches again to Ohio for some dreadfully unfunny reality-show-contestant satire that flops dead on arrival due to Moore's dead fish of a performance. Like Grant - who should have turned in a killer Cowell impression here, and whose soulless character bonds with Moore - she remains on the leash, never fully engaging. About the only thing in the too widely ranging American Dreamz that works is Omer, a sweetheart of a character whose earnest lack of talent is as endearing in the film as it would be on a reality show - for a satire aimed at modern society, he's about the only character who could actually exist in it.It has been said by some that Paul Greengrass's United 93 - prior to its opening, at least - is an exploitation of a national tragedy, a shameless attempt to make dramaturgical hay from an episode that should be treated with more respect. The jury of public opinion has yet, of course, to make a ruling in that matter. Until then, though, we have American Dreamz, which seems to think that the Iraq War, terrorism, the death of innocent Middle Easterners by American hands, and the current White House situation are all just as equally worthy targets of spoofery and fun as is reality TV. It's not really a cynical or outrageous point of view, but just a really lazy one, and offensively, exploitatively so.Who likes pizza?

P.S. Review


Very Good
Dylan Kidd's first film, Roger Dodger, conquered the rarified nation of two-character drama, anchored by Kidd's punchy dialogue and Campbell Scott's commanding lead performance. Kidd's follow-up, P.S., suggests he's not quite ready to expand. Not that this is a bad thing. Nor does Kidd actually repeat himself -- as there are a good deal more than two important characters in P.S., and that's the problem.

The two we care about are Louise (Laura Linney) and F. Scott (Topher Grace), an admissions officer at Columbia University and a prospective student, respectively. Their relationship hangs on a fascinatingly awkward hook: F. Scott is the spitting image of Louise's long-ago first love (now deceased): in body, mind, soul, and some other ways that are even harder to fake, like handwriting. Louise, a lonely divorcee, latches onto F. Scott's eerie familiarity. F. Scott, as a young man, latches onto Louise's cautious older-woman hotness.

Continue reading: P.S. Review

Miller's Crossing Review


Good
The Coen brothers went all Clockwork Orangey in their most violent but least ironic picture, Miller's Crossing. It's a relatively run of the mill gangster thriller, though oddly the film has found an intensely loyal audience. (Many even consider it to be the best of the Coens' films.) The story follows a Prohibition era crime boss's aide (Gabriel Byrne), who finds himself trying to keep the peace between his boss and a warring faction. He loves his boss's gal, too.

Continue reading: Miller's Crossing Review

Welcome To Mooseport Review


Bad
If you thought the issues that plagued Florida voters during the last Presidential election were a bit unbelievable, then welcome to Mooseport - a coastal Maine town where electing a mayor is more difficult than counting hanging chads. In this film, an "election" means finding the most qualified person to decide the "tough" issues like where a stop sign should be placed or who should date the town veterinarian.

Enter former President Monroe Cole (Gene Hackman). He's the most liked President since JFK, and he has decided to make Mooseport his retirement haven. Not that he has much of a choice since his ex-wife, the former First Lady, has nearly cleaned him dry in a nasty divorce. Mooseport is also going through a crisis. The mayor has recently died, and the troubled city council cannot find anyone willing to run for office. With President Cole now living in town, the city council sees him as the answer to their prayers, and after enough of their pressure, Cole enters the race for no other reason than to keep his last possession: his vacation home.

Continue reading: Welcome To Mooseport Review

Bad News Bears Review


Bad
When a movie this awful tosses the adjective "bad" into its title, we call it truth in advertising. Look beyond the easy-target moniker and you'll find even more bad news: Richard Linklater's remake of Michael Ritchie's misfits-on-the-mound classic is a major league disappointment, a mean-spirited, insensitive, and racist misfire that should have Walter Matthau and original Bad News Bears screenwriter Bill Lancaster spinning in their graves.

Linklater scored critical praise for his similarly paced School of Rock, and makes only slight alterations to the slacker-mentors-kids formula in hopes of duplicating his success. His cringeworthy Bears places former major league pitcher Morris Buttermaker (Billy Bob Thornton) in charge of a scornful army of selfish brats, then marches them through conventional hurdles on the way to a preposterous championship game.

Continue reading: Bad News Bears Review

Desperate Measures Review


Weak
Michael Keaton as a serial killer? Well, why not, I guess. He was the original Batman, after all. But Michael Keaton as a serial killer who happens to be the only man alive whose DNA matches the son of the cop who busted him and needs some kind of transplant? Er, someone needs to go back to reality school.

The First Wives Club Review


Very Good
The biggest crowd-pleaser of the year is upon us -- the powerhouse trio of Goldie Hawn, Bette Midler, and Diane Keaton foisting their womanness on us with a vengeance. Sure to revive the debate over whether films like this are "man hating," The First Wives Club is, in reality, a harmless big screen sitcom that actually manages to appeal to a large audience.

Rambling through its first 30 minutes with no real direction, The First Wives Club eventually turns into a story about three old friends who want to exact vengeance on their wayward ex-husbands. Elise (Hawn) is an aging movie star, obsessed, as most aging movie stars are, about her looks. Brenda (Midler) is a bitter ex-housewife who loves her son and bemoans her lack of funds to support him -- and hasn't changed her hair since 1969. Annie (Keaton) is basically a middle-aged version of Annie Hall, only now she has a lesbian daughter and an intrusive mother, and Woody Allen is nowhere to be seen.

Continue reading: The First Wives Club Review

Mystic River Review


Weak
Around this time of year, select projects start entering theaters powered by an invisible yet completely tangible force known as Awards Buzz. Mystic River, Clint Eastwood's adaptation of Dennis Lehane's textured novel, enjoys such clout, and with good reason. For his 24th directorial effort, the Hollywood legend assembles an impressive cast and marries them to a hefty and literate screenplay by Oscar-winner Brian Helgeland (L.A. Confidential). Then, in typical Clint fashion, he challenges his actors to claw out from underneath his heavy-handed direction.

Some manage, but most do not, and River drowns in tedium and cumbersome symbolism as a result. The 73-year-old Eastwood remains a meat-and-potatoes filmmaker. He's not afraid to take chances when selecting material, but his no-nonsense approach regardless of the content dooms this and other projects to a static and mind-numbingly wearisome state.

Continue reading: Mystic River Review

The Daytrippers Review


Very Good
Not a bad little romantic comedy, with the radiant Davis tracking down her wayward husband (Tucci) from Long Island to Manhattan.

Flubber Review


Bad
See Inspector Gadget. Add anthropomorphic green goo. Same movie. Similarly stupid and vapid.

Gaudi Afternoon Review


OK
Oddball and out of sync, I'm at a loss to figure out how Judy Davis, Juliette Lewis, and Marcia Gay Harden got attached to this project -- with Harden agreeing to play a transsexual, at that. Meandering and a little bit vapid, what develops is a light piece about the hapless Davis, hired to work as a kind of P.I. in Barcelona in a missing persons case. Needless to say, lots of silliness about gender-bending ensues. Definitely for the woman who's comfortable with her sense of self.

Pollock Review


Very Good
Please, please, please, please, please read the book that formed the basis of the movie Pollock. Jackson Pollock: An American Saga won the Pulitzer Prize for a good reason: It's a 934-page masterpiece that gets into the guts of the artist now being celebrated on celluloid by Ed Harris. Published in 1989 and written by Steven Naifeh and Gregory White Smith, the tome contains everything about Pollock that was left out of Harris' up-and-down movie -- and, unfortunately, that means 99 percent of the demons, doubters, friends, and forces that inspired Pollock to drink, paint, drink, and paint again.

A good example: Pollock was suicidal, maniacal and violent throughout his 44-year life. The first sentence of Naifeh's and Smith's book -- the very first sentence -- is this quote from Pollock: "I'm going to kill myself." Explains a lot, but for some odd reason, Harris only hints at Pollock's suicidal tendencies in his long-anticipated film.

Continue reading: Pollock Review

Mona Lisa Smile Review


Good
For most of us, a satirical review of the stuffy attitudes and strict behaviors of the 1950s as seen in Mona Lisa Smile provides a refreshing contrast to our relaxed manners today. Unfortunately, this is all I got from Smile, despite the film's best intentions to present themes of feminine independence. It's an excellent message for young women that should be embraced; yet the film completely betrays this mission by giving us a one-sided central character with a very narrow-minded viewpoint.

Smile stars Julia Roberts as Katherine Watson, a new teacher who has accepted a position to teach art history at Wellesley - the all women college in Massachusetts. Much to her dismay, the progressive thinking taught in California is not embraced by the stiff administrators at Wellesley, and prompts comments like, "You didn't come to Wellesley to help people find their way, you came to help people find your way."

Continue reading: Mona Lisa Smile Review

Casa De Los Babys Review


Good
In a fit of Altman-envy, auteur filmmaker John Sayles has delivered a picture that has a situation instead of a plot and brought together a bevy of top actresses to act it out within a seemingly loose framework. But the lack of a plot doesn't mean it doesn't have a structure, and the one here is engineered to convey the range of needs and problems connected with first-world women adopting third-world babies.

Six women from the U.S. with different life experiences and unique values are brought together in their quests to adopt a baby in an unstated South American country (though shot in and around Acapulco, Mexico). The problem they all face is the bureaucracy that's in charge of the process -- one that feels uncomfortably arbitrary, subject to more whim than substance.

Continue reading: Casa De Los Babys Review

Pollock Review


Good

As an actor portraying the inner turmoil of Jackson Pollock -- the revolutionary abstractionist known for his splatter-and-drip painting style -- Ed Harris gives a commanding, potent performance in "Pollock" that is a torrential mix of the artist's chaotic talent and his more chaotic psyche.

As a director depicting Jackson Pollock's world, Ed Harris (yes, he did double-duty on this film) captures with vivid, lively authenticity both the astute yet pretentious buzz of the 1940s Manhattan art scene and his subject's tumultuous personal life, marked by hard drinking and a stormy long-term affair with fellow painter Lee Krasner (Marcia Gay Harden).

Together Ed Harris the actor and Ed Harris the director create an imposing, invigorating cinematic biography fueled by its subject's stubborn, manic energy and his strangely uncommunicative charisma.

Continue reading: Pollock Review

Marcia Gay Harden

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Marcia Gay Harden

Date of birth

14th August, 1959

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.64






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Marcia Gay Harden Movies

Fifty Shades Freed Trailer

Fifty Shades Freed Trailer

They say that marriage can sometimes destroy a couple's sexual chemistry - but that is...

Fifty Shades Darker Trailer

Fifty Shades Darker Trailer

When Ana and Christian had their first fateful meeting, neither party knew much about the...

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Get A Job Trailer

Get A Job Trailer

Will and Jillian are in love and both have recently graduated collage. Jillian managed to...

Grandma Movie Review

Grandma Movie Review

The fabulous Lily Tomlin finally gets the lead role she deserves in this smart, engaging...

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Grandma Trailer

Grandma Trailer

Elle Reid may be tough, but she's struggling coping with a recent break-up with her...

Elsa & Fred Movie Review

Elsa & Fred Movie Review

While this geriatric romance is too simplistic and sentimental to be anything remarkable, its lively...

Grandma - Clip Trailer

Grandma - Clip Trailer

Elle Reid is an ageing poet recovering from a broken heart following her break-up with...

Fifty Shades of Grey Movie Review

Fifty Shades of Grey Movie Review

After all the hype, it's impossible not to expect steam from this adaptation of E.L....

Fifty Shades Of Grey - Clips And Extended Trailer

Fifty Shades Of Grey - Clips And Extended Trailer

When reserved college girl Anastasia Steele meets mysterious businessman Christian Grey for an interview, she...

Fifty Shades Of Grey - Fairy Tale TV Spot Trailer

Fifty Shades Of Grey - Fairy Tale TV Spot Trailer

Sometimes, a single favour to a friend can end up changing you entirely. When a...

Fifty Shades Of Grey Trailer

Fifty Shades Of Grey Trailer

Budding journalist and college student Anastasia Steele has never been the adventurous type in any...

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