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Malcolm Mcdowell

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Kelley McDowell and Malcolm McDowell - Kelley McDowell, Malcolm McDowell Thursday 27th October 2011 LACMA 2012 Art + Film Gala Honoring Ed Ruscha and Stanley Kubrick presented by Gucci at LACMA - Arrivals

Kelley Mcdowell and Malcolm Mcdowell

Malcolm McDowell Friday 30th March 2012 'The Unleashed' premiere at The Royal during the 2012 Canadian Film Festival - Arrivals

Malcolm Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell and Da Silva
Malcolm Mcdowell and Da Silva
Malcolm Mcdowell

Rob Zombie, Malcolm McDowell and Walk Of Fame - Rob Zombie and Malcolm McDowell Friday 16th March 2012 The Hollywood Walk of Fame honors Malcolm McDowell on Hollywood Boulevard

Rob Zombie, Malcolm Mcdowell and Walk Of Fame
Malcolm Mcdowell, Rob Zombie and Walk Of Fame
Malcolm Mcdowell, Rob Zombie and Walk Of Fame
Rob Zombie and Walk Of Fame
Rob Zombie and Walk Of Fame
Rob Zombie and Walk Of Fame

Malcolm McDowell Thursday 19th May 2011 Celebrities leaving the Martinez Hotel during the 2011 Cannes International Film Festival - Day 9 Cannes, France

Malcolm Mcdowell

Malcolm McDowell - Malcolm McDowell with wife Kelley McDowell and son Seamus Hudson McDowell Los Angeles, California - Los Angeles Premiere of 'The Book Of Eli' held at the Grauman's Chinese Theater Monday 11th January 2010

Malcolm Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell

Malcolm McDowell - Malcolm McDowell and Guest Ojai, California - Ojai Film Festival Casino Night at the Ojai Valley Inn & Spa Thursday 5th November 2009

Malcolm Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell, Robby Krieger and Joe Parent

Malcolm McDowell, Seamus Hudson McDowell and Kelly McDowell - Malcolm McDowell, Seamus Hudson McDowell and Kelly McDowell Thursday 5th November 2009 at Celebrity Golf Classic Ventura, California

Malcolm Mcdowell, Seamus Hudson Mcdowell and Kelly Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell and Seamus Hudson Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell and Seamus Hudson Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell

Bolt Trailer


Bolt is a super-dog! He’s got his own TV show and his life on camera is full of adventure, the reality is of course that he’s not a super dog, he’s just a normal pup who happens to be on TV, so when he accidentally finds himself in New York city, trying to distinguish between on screen stunts and real life situations becomes pretty hard! Along the way Bolt makes some friends who help him find his way back home to owner and co-star Penny!

Continue: Bolt Trailer

Malcolm McDowell Thursday 14th August 2008 The Ojai film festival fundraiser Ojai, California

Malcolm Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell

Malcolm McDowell, Las Vegas, Star Trek and Star Trek Convention Saturday 9th August 2008 at the official 2008 Star Trek Convention at the Las Vegas Hilton Las Vegas, NV

Malcolm Mcdowell, Las Vegas, Star Trek and Star Trek Convention
Malcolm Mcdowell, Las Vegas, Star Trek and Star Trek Convention

Malcom McDowell Thursday 12th June 2008 35th Annual Vision Awards at The Beverly Hilton. Beverly Hills, California

Malcom Mcdowell
Malcom Mcdowell
Malcom Mcdowell
Malcom Mcdowell and Dee Wallace

Malcolm McDowell Saturday 7th June 2008 'The Big Apple Comic Book, Art, Toy & Sci-fi Show' - day one, held at the Penn Plaza Pavillion New York City, USA

Malcolm Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell

O Lucky Man! Review


Excellent
Countless "human pinball" movies (think After Hours) owe a deep debt to O Lucky Man! Complex, fascinating, and even a bit confusing, the film is a sprawling, three-hour adventure that will quite literally have you guessing until the very end.

After an opening vignette that tells us exactly what it means to be "unlucky," we meet our "lucky" hero: Michael Travis (Malcolm McDowell) a sales trainee for a British coffee company. His first day on the job, that inimitable McDowell smile lands him an instant position in the field as a traveling sales rep serving the northeast part of England. Soon he's making sales calls and finds himself sucked into an upscale swinger's club, complete with live sex shows. Life's looking up... at least until a lost Travis stumbles upon a secret military base and is tortured as a spy... only to be saved at the last second when something unseen goes awry, causing the base to evacuate.

Continue reading: O Lucky Man! Review

Malcolm McDowell and AFI - Friday 2nd November 2007 at Arclight Theater Los Angeles, California

Malcolm Mcdowell and Afi

Halloween (2007) Review


Good
Halloween's Michael Myers has seen many incarnations during his 29-year reign of terror. While he hasn't yet seen the vastness of space (boldly not going where most horror franchises eventually go), he has met a similar fate -- the remake. Although the majority of horror moviegoers are just looking for the next gore-fest, true horror fans are as rabid as Christians looking to crucify the latest blasphemously-filmed story of Christ. Luckily, director Rob Zombie is a member of the horror genre cult and treats his Halloween remake with the utmost respect, while amping up the intensity for a post-Saw audience.

From the 90-minute Abercrombie and Fitch ad that was 2003's Texas Chainsaw Massacre to the abysmal The Hills Have Eyes in 2006, classic horror films have been turned into exploitive, empty filler for the benefit of the box office. Zombie, on the other hand, explores the mythology of the original Halloween by psychologically deconstructing Michael Myers, instead of exploiting the original idea of "The Shape" -- the personified evil of the original. Zombie's film opens with the Myers family; of course, this is a Zombie film, so they are a white trash, long haired clan whose cursing would put sailors to shame. In this Halloween outing, we see Myers' transformation into the infamous serial killer.

Continue reading: Halloween (2007) Review

Malcolm McDowell Thursday 23rd August 2007 'Halloween' premiere held at Mann's Chinese Theater - Arrivals Hollywood, California

Malcolm Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell

Malcolm McDowell and his family - Malcolm McDowell and his family Hollywood, California - 'Halloween' premiere held at Mann's Chinese Theater - Arrivals Thursday 23rd August 2007

Malcolm Mcdowell and His Family

Malcolm McDowell Tuesday 15th May 2007 An Evening At Sanderson charity reception in aid of CLIC Sargent, held at The Sanderson Hotel - Departures London, England

Malcolm Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell
Malcolm Mcdowell

The Barber Review


Weak
Murderous barber? Check. Alaskan village where the sun never comes up? Check. The Barber oddly relies on two plot devices to get its simplistic tale across (the barber is killing people in an Alaskan village where the sun never comes up), with Malcolm McDowell narrating all the while. This is cute for awhile but it soon wears thin, with the gimmicks grinding you down until you pretty much stop caring what happens, despite the rising body count and the almost disturbing portrayal of McDowell as a sort of lothario. There's kind of a nutty twist at the end, but on the off chance you're still watching, I won't spoil it.

Evilenko Review


Weak
Why change the name of a real-life bad guy, A. R. Cikatilo, who killed and ate some 50 children in a Cold War-era U.S.S.R.? Why, so you can change it to Evilenko, which still sounds Russian but has the word "evil" in it. As played by Malcolm McDowell, the aging school teacher-cum-murderer is suitably, almost stereotypically, creepy, but the movie he's asked to buttress comes off as cold and irrelevant. The hotshot detective on the case isn't so much an investigator as a sleepwalker. More than anything, his lazy inquisition (and McDowell's banal defense: impotence) reminds us why communism didn't work out for the Russians.

Time After Time Review


Very Good
As ridiculous fantasy movies go, Time After Time has got to be one of the most absurd. Got to be. How else would you explain a film in which Jack the Ripper goes forward in time in H.G. Wells' time machine -- and Wells pursues him in order to apprehend the killer? Yeah, exactly. This cinematic oddity is nonetheless a true guilty pleasure, with Malcolm McDowell (as Wells) discovering the joys of French fries and motorcars as he's transported to modern-day San Francisco in a machine that, unbelievably, accounts for time zones. Mary Steenburgen is awful (declaring on their first date that she's "not a dyke!") as the love interest -- but so awful you can't turn away.

Blue Thunder Review


Very Good
When John Badham's Blue Thunder came out I was just a kid, but the film made quite an impression on me. I didn't actually see it. And I suspect that most of the kids who told me long rambling stories about it didn't either. It was one of those school yard legends, like the one about the woman in the apartment across from the middle school who gets undressed in her window for all the world to see, or the one about the kid who was skateboarding a swimming pool and found a machine gun in the deep end. Blue Thunder was just the sweetest thing we could imagine. I mean, it was a helicopter that flew silently (so the story went) and it was all high tech and it could kill a million people in a few seconds. This was the Cold War and something like Blue Thunder just seemed too incredible. This was Ronald Reagan's secret weapon against the commies.

Of course, like all schoolyard tales it was too good to be true. "Blue Thunder" wasn't a top clandestine Commie-busting nuke firing super secret weapon; it was a cool looking helicopter that the cops used to control rioters. When I actually saw the movie a few years later, I was bummed to say the least.

Continue reading: Blue Thunder Review

Cat People (1982) Review


Good
I've never seen the original 1942 Cat People (I have now -Ed.), but I have a hard time imagining it bears much resemblance to this 1982 remake, courtesy of director Paul Schrader (American Gigolo), writer Alan Ormsby (who wrote Porky's II and four of the Substitute movies), and stars Nastassja Kinski and Malcolm McDowell.

Bizarre from frame one, the story tells of an ancient race of werewolf-like cat people, doomed to turn into black leopards (is that the same thing as a panther?) if they mate with humans. The only way to maintain human form, they say, is to mate with another cat person -- or, apparently, to devour a human in a lusty rage.

Continue reading: Cat People (1982) Review

Caligula Review


Weak
Hokey doesn't even begin to describe it. Take A Clockwork Orange and remove all the clothes, triple the violence, and roll the clock back 2000 years, and you've got an approximation of the Roman Caligula, the only film where the orgies are bigger than the war scenes. Oh yeah, get rid of the plot altogether. Maybe through in some more boobs... yeah, that's Caligula. Only from Guccione and Penthouse...

Tank Girl Review


Bad
Lori Petty, America's number one Madonna wannabe, is back in action as Tank Girl, a comic book character come to life. Actually, the whole movie is a comic book come to life. Live action is spliced with still shots of comic strip panels and some full-motion animation, so if you get bored with the live-action part of this picture (and you probably will), at least you can look at the cartoons.

Not that these bits are any more entertaining, but at least they're a change of pace from the dull storyline. The filmmakers use them any time there is the possibility for a neat special effect or some potential for plot development, so they don't waste any money on actually interesting footage, instead copping out to some goofball crayon scribbling.

Continue reading: Tank Girl Review

I Spy Review


Terrible
I Spy is based on a popular 1960s television show by the same name where two mismatched spies, one white (Robert Culp) and one black (Bill Cosby), engage in wild antics to fight evil around the world. For a series during the middle of the civil rights era, it was considered groundbreaking. Unfortunately, the movie version completely disrespects this inventiveness of the original series. In fact, the movie is thoroughly insulting.

Owen Wilson is Alex Scott, a second-rate super-spy for the BNS (think CIA, I guess), who is always relegated to the department's least desirable assignments. Other BNS spies, like the suave Bond-like Carlos (Gary Cole), are equipped with the most sophisticated spy tools and receive the most attractive jobs. Scott's newest mission though, requires him to travel to Budapest, Hungary with beautiful fellow agent Rachel Wright (Famke Janssen) to prevent the sale of an invisible stealth spy plane. Some of the world's worst criminals have gathered in Budapest for a party sponsored by criminal mastermind Gundars (Malcolm McDowell). He plans to sell this plane during the celebration for an upcoming boxing match, which happens to involve the wildly flamboyant American featherweight boxing champion Kelly Robinson (Eddie Murphy). The BNS officials recruit Robinson to help Scott and Wright get into the party and accomplish their mission.

Continue reading: I Spy Review

The Company Review


Extraordinary
Thank you, Robert Altman. Coming fast on the heels of one of the worst moviegoing years of recent memory, The Company appears like a wondrous beacon of light. (It even trumps Altman protégé Alan Rudolph's clear-eyed ode to middle class challenges, The Secret Lives of Dentists.) Altman casts his gaze upon the Joffrey Ballet of Chicago: their days and nights, their strict regime and straight-ahead pursuit of artistic expression, and the grueling physical toll of stretching their bodies to the limit. Opening with a modern dance number with performers in skin-tight costumes racing across the stage with multi-colored banners, The Company is like a direct appeal to the heart and mind, to which I can only exclaim, "Wonderful!" and "Beautiful!" It's a reminder of what cinema can do, and the poetry of the dancer's movements is corresponded to with Altman's visual panache, his use of vivid colors, his vividly imaginative framing.

It shames flashy movies like The Matrix sequels, which adopt surface style and frenetic movement but lack sheer, sumptuous vision. Altman's movie isn't just a pretty sheen ("I hate pretty!" snaps Malcolm McDowell as the head of the ballet company), it's a full audio-visual experience. For all the limbs blown apart in Matrix Revolutions it's got nothing on the Company dancers bandaging their bruised heels and toes, or the horrifying moment when a tendon snaps during a rehearsal. It's something we can respond to, relate to. It's emotion pictures, corresponding to the vibrant, emotive images of the dance.

Continue reading: The Company Review

Star Trek: Generations Review


Good
The seventh Star Trek movie went where no man had gone before, at least not in Hollywood: Attempting to take an old and lethargic movie franchise and reinvigorate it with a new cast -- uniting both the original and new casts in one massive crossover movie.

Generations (having dispensed with the numbering of the sequels) is a fair enough film. It's massively contrived to be sure -- the Kirk-era cast and Picard-era cast were meant to be some 80 years apart -- but considering the difficulty of trying to combine two crews in one movie, Shatner & Stewart turned in a fair enough endeavor.

Continue reading: Star Trek: Generations Review

I'll Sleep When I'm Dead Review


Very Good
To say that the new Mike Hodges film I'll Sleep When I'm Dead confounds expectations doesn't even really begin to describe what this beguiling curiosity does, which shouldn't really be surprise, as Hodges is the director who's given us everything from 1998's Croupier to the Max von Sydow campfest Flash Gordon. Shot mostly in the seedier parts of Brixton (non-swinging London), I'll Sleep is just as ill-concerned with looking like a flash gangster flick - which, in some strange sense, it is - than it is with marrying its two wildly divergent plot strands.

In the first, seemingly primary story, we follow Davey Graham (Jonathan Rhys-Meyers) on his none-too-taxing nightly rounds: a little coke-delivery to a fancy party, then a one-nighter with a blonde model (whom he robs), and then to home. Only he's being followed by some tuxedo-wearing rent-a-thugs and a malevolent Malcolm McDowell, who assault him in a shockingly horrific manner - it's quick and brutal, a Hodges specialty, and completely out of nowhere, like a random visit from the Devil. This leaves Davey emotionally shattered and he commits suicide not longer after.

Continue reading: I'll Sleep When I'm Dead Review

Britannia Hospital Review


OK
It's hard to imagine a more scattered and absurd film, and Britannia Hospital must be a lot of fun if your mood has been chemically altered. Before the day is up at the kooky Britannia Hospital, there will be a mad scientist who not only creates a synthetic, talking brain but also hacks up Malcolm McDowell with a meat cleaver, there'll be protests, a labor strike, and the Queen of England will be on hand to witness it all. Crazy, and pretty much nonsense in the end. Check out The Kingdom TV series for a similar story done with more flair.

My Life So Far Review


Weak
I guess you're either one of those people who loves 1930's Scottish coming-of-age stories, or you're not.

Looks like I'm not.

Continue reading: My Life So Far Review

Princess Of Thieves Review


Weak
Like father, like daughter, right? This Disney fable continues the legend of Robin Hood via his young daughter Gwyn (Keira Knightley, who had a small part as Amidala's #6 assistant in Star Wars: Episode I), who chops off her long locks and follows in dear old dad's footsteps (literally -- she has a romance with a royal, enters an archery tournament in disguise, and fights the evil king). The plot is virtually indistinguishable from the traditional tale, only with a zit-free, teeth-whitened, Disney Channel-friendly kid in the lead and the ultimate goal being to save dad from execution. Gulp! (Well, don't worry, it's all tamely G-rated, or essentially so.)

Continue reading: Princess Of Thieves Review

A Clockwork Orange Review


Essential
Kubrick was a beatnik poet. His work was plagued with metaphors, and the disease of hidden meaning was always turned to his advantage. In 2001: A Space Odyssey, he had almost a precognisance about the worry of the future that the millennium has exhibited so well for us. In The Shining, he taught us that, to a degree, all fear came from oneself. In Full Metal Jacket, he said that war was the ultimate destructor of the psyche. In Eyes Wide Shut, his final opus, he told us that love, handled like revenge, can only have destructive consequences.

The message, for those of you people who were not able to discern it past the violence in A Clockwork Orange, was the same of the Hindu construct known as Karma: what goes around, comes around.

Continue reading: A Clockwork Orange Review

Bobby Jones, Stroke Of Genius Review


Bad
If Jim Caviezel wanted his next project after The Passion of the Christ to be bland, uncontroversial, and utterly forgettable, he picked a winner in Bobby Jones, Stroke of Genius. The only people bothering Caviezel will be fanatical golfers desperate to find out how he duplicated Jones's classic swing.

Presented by the Bobby Jones Film Company and approved by his heirs, so you know it's brutally honest, Stroke of Genius details the first half of Jones's life, which is presented with as much narrative élan as a fifth grader's book report. A sickly boy, Bobby watches with rapt attention the matches on the golf course near his house. He spends hours practicing in the vast Georgia countryside, and as a teenager becomes a star amateur. Later, after years of struggling, he becomes the best golfer in the world.

Continue reading: Bobby Jones, Stroke Of Genius Review

I Spy Review


Unbearable

It's been 20 years since "48 Hrs." made Eddie Murphy a movie star and the man hasn't aged a day. But his showboating wise-cracker stock persona sure is getting old.

Unfurling that same mustachioed smirk he's worn in all his worst movies, Murphy strikes out again in "I-Spy," an ill-conceived, utterly vacuous, assembly-line, buddy action-comedy slapped together from paltry cloak-and-dagger scraps, off-the-shelf gimmicks and 30-year-old special effects.

Murphy plays a rich, egotistical professional boxer who is paired with a hapless secret agent (the winkingly ironic Owen Wilson, "Behind Enemy Lines") under the flimsiest of "wouldn't it be funny if" pretenses. The entire concept behind the film seems to consist of dropping these two into shopworn set pieces (a car chase, a shoot-out) and letting them ad-lib, ad nauseam.

Continue reading: I Spy Review

Gangster No.1 Review


Good

At the center of the violent, commanding English underworld flick "Gangster No.1" is an innovative and enticing bit of ironic casting. The story of a vicious mafia thug who hasn't changed at all in 30 years except to get more brutal and bitter, it features an unnamed title character played in two brilliantly vile performances by two sublimely in-sync actors.

Meanwhile, all the Gangster's acquaintances and enemies (he has no friends) change immeasurably over the years -- many of them trying to lead better lives -- yet they're all played by the same actors in both the film's 1968 past and 1999 present.

For director Paul McGuigan this is more than a gimmick. It's a metaphorical dichotomy with a resounding effect.

Continue reading: Gangster No.1 Review

In Good Company Review


Bad

Real-world credibility is a really big problem for "In Good Company," a weightless, dishonest dramedy about a middle-aged ad man whose 20-year career is upended when a corporate takeover sees him demoted in favor of a clueless, under-ripe young executive.

Dennis Quaid is believable enough as the head of ad sales for a sports magazine, and Scarlett Johansson is well cast as his 19-year-old daughter who becomes an object of desire for Quaid's wet-behind-the-ears new boss. But Topher Grace, who was great as a young man in over his head with an older woman in "P.S." a few months back, is badly miscast as the nervous ladder-climber who takes over Quaid's job, then uses the older man's experience like a life raft to keep himself afloat. And that's one of the movie's lesser problems.

Written and directed by Paul Weitz (who made "American Pie" and "About a Boy" with his brother Chris), almost every scene in the movie lacks authenticity on some level. There's never a single discussion of sports in the offices of Sports America, where not a single person wears a team jersey or baseball cap, and where there's not a single TV anywhere in sight for watching sporting events. The wood-paneled halls are populated entirely by tired, 50- and 60-year-old men (like character actors Philip Baker Hall and David Paymer) in drab suits, whom Weitz portrays as sacred cows being led to the slaughter by the insolent invasion of youth culture.

Continue reading: In Good Company Review

Hidalgo Review


Good

"Hidalgo" stars the magnetically scruffy and unruffled Viggo Mortensen ("The Lord of the Rings") as Frank Hopkins, a famously fast Pony Express rider who became a long-distance legend in 1890 when he and his undersized mustang were the first Westerners to enter the most grueling horse race in the world -- 3,000 parched miles across the Arabian desert.

The film is based on a true story -- well, except for the romance with a sheikh's fiery daughter, the swordfights and shootouts, the kidnapping, and the conspiracies and double-crosses that lead to such things. (Now that's what I call fictionalization!) But if there's a good movie to be made from such archaic adventure clichés, this picture has the right guy behind the wheel: director Joe Johnston.

Having helmed "The Rocketeer," Disney's wonderfully corny revival of 1940s science-fiction superhero-dom, and "October Sky," a vivid, timeless, 1950s-style feel-good biography about a real NASA scientist's rocket-building teens, Johnston has a knack for finding freshness in the most hackneyed of stories. He even breathed new surprises into the third "Jurassic Park" movie. So bring on the quicksand, sandstorms and locusts! After "Hidalgo," I'm starting to think this guy can mold any perfunctory script into a thoroughly fun and satisfying Saturday matinee.

Continue reading: Hidalgo Review

Malcolm Mcdowell

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Malcolm McDowell

Date of birth

13th June, 1943

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.74


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Malcolm McDowell Movies

Lessons In Love Trailer

Lessons In Love Trailer

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Antiviral Movie Review

Antiviral Movie Review

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Excision Movie Review

Excision Movie Review

There's an element of parody to this jet-black comedy, but the film is so creepy...

Vamps Trailer

Vamps Trailer

Stacey and Goody are two vampires cursed to remain young and beautiful forever after being...

Silent Hill: Revelation 3D Trailer

Silent Hill: Revelation 3D Trailer

Heather Mason is now a teenager and has grown up running away from dark forces...

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A Green Story Trailer

A Green Story Trailer

Trailer for A Green StoryUpcoming movie A Green Story does exactly what it says on...

The Artist Trailer

The Artist Trailer

George Valentin is a silent movie star in 1920's Hollywood. His latest film, A Russian...

The Artist Movie Review

The Artist Movie Review

Made as a 1920s-style silent movie, this hugely enjoyable film is already a classic. And...

Easy A Movie Review

Easy A Movie Review

Smarter than your average teen comedy, this snappy movie knows how to keeps us laughing....

Easy A Trailer

Easy A Trailer

Olive is a straight up girl, she works hard in classes, she isn't one of...

The Book of Eli Movie Review

The Book of Eli Movie Review

Although it feels like a parallel story taking place at the same time as The...

Bolt Trailer

Bolt Trailer

Bolt is a super-dog! He’s got his own TV show and his life on camera...

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