Madeleine Stowe

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Madeleine Stowe - Elle Women in Hollywood Awards 22nd Annual Celebration held at the Four Seasons Hotel Beverly Hills - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 19th October 2015

Madeleine Stowe
Madeleine Stowe
Madeleine Stowe
Madeleine Stowe

ABC Cancels 'Revenge' After Four Seasons


Emily Vancamp Madeleine Stowe ABC

ABC has cancelled ‘Revenge’ after four seasons, it has been revealed. A source confirmed to E! News that the network would be bringing the series to an end, and that the series finale would be broadcast on Sunday, May 10th at 10pm ET.

‘Revenge’s executive producer Sunil Nayar told Entertainment Weekly, who first broke the news: “We can officially tell our fans that this will be the end of the story. We've been talking to the network and we all just wanted to make sure that we felt very confident."

Emily VanCampEmily Vancamp, the star of ABC's 'Revenge'

Continue reading: ABC Cancels 'Revenge' After Four Seasons

Madeleine Stowe - ABC TCA Summer 2013 Party - Beverly Hills, CA, United States - Monday 5th August 2013

Madeleine Stowe
Madeleine Stowe

Madeleine Stowe - Disney & ABC TCA summer press tour held at Beverly Hilton Hotel - Arrivals - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Monday 5th August 2013

Madeleine Stowe
Madeleine Stowe
Madeleine Stowe

Madeleine Stowe - Celebrities attend Disney / ABC TCA Summer Press Tour at Beverly Hilton Hotel. - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Sunday 4th August 2013

Madeleine Stowe
Madeleine Stowe
Madeleine Stowe
Madeleine Stowe
Madeleine Stowe
Madeleine Stowe

Madeleine Stowe - The Hollywood Domino pre-Oscar Gala and Tournament at Sunset Tower Hotel - West Hollywood, California, United States - Thursday 21st February 2013

Madeleine Stowe
Madeleine Stowe
Madeleine Stowe

Revenge Review


Very Good
Revenge refers to two people's actions in Tony Scott's rough-hewn underseen 1990 drama. It starts with a Navy fighter pilot (Scott had just made Top Gun) named Jay (Kevin Costner), who retires from the Navy and opts to visit an old client named Mendez (a fierce Anthony Quinn) in Mexico. It isn't long before he's sweatily banging Mendez's impossibly gorgeous wife (Madeleine Stowe). They escape for a weekend getaway, but it isn't long before Mendez, an obvious mafioso of some kind, tracks them down and has his thugs go to town on the duo. Amazingly, they both survive, and revenge #2 kicks in.

Don't expect a lot of twists and turns along the way: Often pegged as a thriller, Revenge is in actuality a straightforward story of obsession and, um, revenge. Boy meets girl, boy loses girl, boy finds girl again, with plenty of blood spilled along the way.

Continue reading: Revenge Review

Short Cuts Review


Very Good
While one could argue that Robert Altman's 1993 film Short Cuts was simply an updating of his 1975 classic Nashville, with a much higher quotient of star power and slightly more prurient subject matter - an attempt to keep the once iconic filmmaker from straying into the shadowy irrelevance like so many of his '70s peers - and while that argument could very well be true, that doesn't deprive Short Cuts of any of its power, or disprove the fact that it's ultimately a better film.

Spinning together a series of short stories from the master of the form, Raymond Carver, Altman takes some 20-odd Los Angelenos and twists their lives together seemingly just for the fun of how their individual little lives play out and connect up, like a puppetmaster who can't stop adding new puppets to his repertoire. To flesh out his tapestry of early '90s Southern California life, Altman has a fine batch of actors and actresses, including everyone from the best of their generation (Jennifer Jason Leigh, Robert Downey Jr) to the solidly respectable but not terribly exciting choices (Julianne Moore, Matthew Modine, Madeleine Stowe) to oddly effective musician stunt casting (Lyle Lovett, Tom Waits, Huey Lewis) to one lordly presence (Jack Lemmon).

Continue reading: Short Cuts Review

We Were Soldiers Review


Good
Post September 11 cinema has seen its share of war movies designed to evoke and sustain a sense of American patriotism. In the last few months, we've re-visited the war in Kosovo (Behind Enemy Lines), the war in Somalia (Black Hawk Down), and most recently, World War II (Hart's War). We Were Soldiers is the latest in the onslaught, a story based on the true accounts of the first bloody battle of the Vietnam War. With so many war films recently released, We Were Soldiers has a difficult task as it tries to ride the patriotism express.

We Were Soldiers is based on the book We Were Soldiers Once...And Young written by Lieutenant Colonel Harold Moore and Joseph L. Galloway, the only journalist willing to go into the front lines to capture a first hand account of the war. In the film, Mel Gibson plays Harold Moore, a down-to-earth officer who is responsible for leading a group of innocent, naive young men into the area of Vietnam known as "The Valley of Death." But not soon after Lt. Col. Moore and his troops touch down, their position is compromised and they find themselves outnumbered almost 5 to 1. The American soldiers engage in a deadly battle for control of the area.

Continue reading: We Were Soldiers Review

The Two Jakes Review


OK
Never willing to leave a classic alone, Hollywood finally dug up Chinatown and sequelized it with The Two Jakes, and they even let Jack Nicholson take the director's chair.

Continue reading: The Two Jakes Review

12 Monkeys Review


Very Good
Avant-garde director Terry Gilliam, absent from the screen since 1991's The Fisher King, has at last returned. The turn of 1996 brings us 12 Monkeys, Gilliam's holocaust/time travel picture about a man, his psychiatrist, and a fiendish plot to decimate the human race...I think. Gilliam is a visual mastermind, but as far as putting together a cohesive, accessible film, he's coming up a little short.

Over the 130-minute running time, a few facts about the plot emerge. You're advised to enter the theater as well-armed with information as possible. He's the lowdown: Bruce Willis is James Cole, a prisoner in the year 2035, when 99 percent of humankind has been eradicated thanks to a virus propagated in 1997. Neo-urban myth traces this virus to a radical group known as the Army of the 12 Monkeys.

Continue reading: 12 Monkeys Review

Playing By Heart Review


Good
Every year like clockwork there's a film that tries to intertwine a dozen characters into one monster story: Short Cuts (1993), Twenty Bucks (1993), Pulp Fiction (1994), 2 Days in the Valley (1996), to name but a few. 1998's entry crept in under the wire: Playing By Heart... and it's finally in wide release.

Now on its third (and worst) title in as many months, Heart follows about a dozen Los Angelenos en route to love and/or misery. Among them are Anderson and Stewart as a couple of silly/wacky would-be lovers; club kids Jolie and Phillippe; ice queen Stowe (having an affair with Edwards); and wedded veterans Rowlands and Connery.

Continue reading: Playing By Heart Review

Impostor Review


Very Good
Not long ago, some genius a lot smarter than me decided it might be nice if instead of just one sheep, we could have two. Thus began man's obsession with cloning: an obsession that, for better or worse, has somehow managed to spill over into your local cineplex. Some days I wish they'd never cloned that damn sheep at all.

Impostor is Hollywood's latest cloning experiment. Based on a short story by futurist Philip K. Dick, Impostor takes place in a future far away, when man is at war with an alien race. Spencer Olham (Gary Sinise) is on the front lines of weapons development to combat man's alien threat. But one day, things go horribly wrong and Spencer finds himself accused by the military of being an alien replicant, with an assassin's bomb implanted in his chest. Unable to believe he is anyone other than himself, Spencer escapes to search for the truth.

Continue reading: Impostor Review

The General's Daughter Review


Bad

Only three or four minutes after the lights go down, any credibility "The General's Daughter" might have as a serious drama goes right out the window with the introduction of the title character.

At a retirement party for The General (James Cromwell), a military banquet hall is filled with brass honoring their commander. The camera searches row after row of stern-looking, spit-and-polish men before moving into a close-up of his daughter (Leslie Stefanson), a hot babe of the underwear model variety, smiling a centerfold smile and, except for her uniform, looking for all intents and purposes like she should be jumping out of a cake.

Forgoing the opportunity for a relatively realistic female officer portrayal like Demi Moore in "A Few Good Men," "The General's Daughter" asks us to believe that this porcelain blonde, who looks like she'd cry if she broke a nail, is not only an army captain but a doctor -- a shrink who instructs soldiers in the psychological warfare, no less.

Continue reading: The General's Daughter Review

We Were Soldiers Review


Good

Mel Gibson plays yet another idealized and idealistic father-of-five war hero, bursting at the seams with charge-leading integrity in "We Were Soldiers," a detailed and staggering account of the first harrowing battle of the Vietnam War.

This may sound like a bit much to take so soon after he single-handedly vanquished the British as a choleric colonial in "The Patriot." But Gibson is well cast in this far heavier and historically accurate picture that only falls back on hackneyed Hollywoodisms when it takes a break from the battlefield (and that isn't very often).

Gibson stars as Lt. Col. Hal Moore, the man who reluctantly but boldly lead the first American ground troops into the Ia Drang Valley on November 14, 1965 -- 11 years after the occupying French were trounced in the same location (as established in the film's brutal World War I-styled prologue).

Continue reading: We Were Soldiers Review

Madeleine Stowe

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Madeleine Stowe Movies

We Were Soldiers Movie Review

We Were Soldiers Movie Review

Post September 11 cinema has seen its share of war movies designed to evoke and...

12 Monkeys Movie Review

12 Monkeys Movie Review

Avant-garde director Terry Gilliam, absent from the screen since 1991's The Fisher King, has at...

Playing By Heart Movie Review

Playing By Heart Movie Review

Every year like clockwork there's a film that tries to intertwine a dozen characters into...

Impostor Movie Review

Impostor Movie Review

Not long ago, some genius a lot smarter than me decided it might be nice...

The General's Daughter Movie Review

The General's Daughter Movie Review

I really like John Travolta. He always plays that guy with the arrogance and...

The General's Daughter Movie Review

The General's Daughter Movie Review

Only three or four minutes after the lights go down, any credibility "The General's Daughter"...

We Were Soldiers Movie Review

We Were Soldiers Movie Review

Mel Gibson plays yet another idealized and idealistic father-of-five war hero, bursting at the seams...

Impostor Movie Review

Impostor Movie Review

Good B-movie science fiction is like a circus high-wire act. A balance has to be...

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