Mackenzie Astin

Mackenzie Astin

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Do You Take This Man? Trailer


Daniel (Anthony Rapp) and Christopher (Jonathan Bennett) are a gay couple preparing for their wedding. It should be a happy time, especially as they are surrounded by their closest friends and family, but there's some tension in the air that's threatening to break them hours before they are due to exchange their vows. They are very different people after all; Daniel is 40-years-old and Christopher's in his early 30s. Their friends are from different walks of life and they most certainly have a different approach to life. Things take a tumultuous turn when an unexpected arrival comes to surprise Christopher, it's Daniel who is the most shocked. They're supposed to be spending the rest of their lives together, so how does he not know about this stranger when everyone else in Christopher's life does? Secrets and jealousy are driving a wedge between the engaged couple, and with all their loved ones reminding them of how much their marriage is going to change their lives, they're starting to wonder if this really is the right thing to be doing.

Continue: Do You Take This Man? Trailer

Mackenzie Astin, James Olivia Fehr, Brendan Fehr and and Team - Hollywood Curling hosts Celebrity Charity Curling Match - Valencia, California, United States - Sunday 7th July 2013

Mackenzie Astin, James Olivia Fehr, Brendan Fehr and And Team
Mackenzie Astin
Mackenzie Astin
Mackenzie Astin
Mackenzie Astin
James Olivia Fehr, Mackenzie Astin and And Team

Stranger Than Fiction (1999) Review


OK
I am beginning to detect a very strange associate with the surreal and the sub par. This is not to say that I have repented and become a born-again fanatic of American cheese-factory films and will worship John Hughes until my knees bleed. Instead, it is only to say that the last several films that I have watched that have had the intent of being surreal have ended up being sub par. For example, take The Sixth Sense, Naked Lunch, The Blair Witch Project and numerous other oddities that escape me at the moment, each film supposedly working off of the weird but instead going into the realm of the noddy viewer (or, in the case of The Blair Witch Project, the physical embodiment of a Pepto Bismol commercial).

The latest in this string of disappointments comes in the form of Stranger Than Fiction, a film which has countless plot twists that are not only predictable but come with predictable regularity. All one must keep in mind to crack this film open like the WWII Enigma cipher is that Stranger Than Fiction works off of the idea that Stranger Than Fiction does not bare any resemblance to actual life (aside from being a perfect demonstration of Murphy's Law) but instead goes more along the lines of every single B-movie mystery you have ever watched. With that implanted in your head, you will not have to sit through the boring second half of the movie which the narrator spends explaining what goes on.

Continue reading: Stranger Than Fiction (1999) Review

In Love And War Review


Weak
This period epic went virtually unseen and for good reason: It doesn't tell you much about love or war... or Ernest Hemingway, its ostensible subject. Chris O'Donnell playing rough-and-tumble Hemingway during his spell in World War I (which he spent in a hospital, falling for one of the nurses) is the bulk of the problem, but Richard Attenborough has never been one to tell a story succinctly, and In Love and War rambles interminably forever, going absolutely nowhere. The script, adapted from the nurse's diaries, actually feels like it was adapted from some nurse's diaries. I'll just read my wife's diary if I want that kind of a thrill.

Stranger Than Fiction Review


OK
I am beginning to detect a very strange associate with the surreal and the sub par. This is not to say that I have repented and become a born-again fanatic of American cheese-factory films and will worship John Hughes until my knees bleed. Instead, it is only to say that the last several films that I have watched that have had the intent of being surreal have ended up being sub par. For example, take The Sixth Sense, Naked Lunch, The Blair Witch Project and numerous other oddities that escape me at the moment, each film supposedly working off of the weird but instead going into the realm of the noddy viewer (or, in the case of The Blair Witch Project, the physical embodiment of a Pepto Bismol commercial).

The latest in this string of disappointments comes in the form of Stranger Than Fiction, a film which has countless plot twists that are not only predictable but come with predictable regularity. All one must keep in mind to crack this film open like the WWII Enigma cipher is that Stranger Than Fiction works off of the idea that Stranger Than Fiction does not bare any resemblance to actual life (aside from being a perfect demonstration of Murphy's Law) but instead goes more along the lines of every single B-movie mystery you have ever watched. With that implanted in your head, you will not have to sit through the boring second half of the movie which the narrator spends explaining what goes on.

Continue reading: Stranger Than Fiction Review

The Last Days Of Disco Review


OK
I've been a fan of Whit Stillman since his first film, Metropolitan, in 1990. It was therefore with no small amount of anticipation that I journeyed to see his third film, The Last Days of Disco.

Of course, when I get worked up over a movie, I'm always disappointed. Sadly, Disco was no exception.

Continue reading: The Last Days Of Disco Review

The Zeros Review


Very Good
A wry and independent black comedy, The Zeros turns the road trip inside out with a funny -- yet ultimately bleak -- look at a young man facing impending death in a not-so-distant dystopia.

Mackenzie Astin (The Last Days of Disco) stars as Joe, who is told by his rather flippant doctor he has a matter of days or weeks to live. A despondent Joe throws caution to the wind and figures he'll go on a cross-country trip of self-discovery, ostensibly in search of his childhood friend Joyce (Jennifer Morrison).

Continue reading: The Zeros Review

The Mating Habits Of The Earthbound Human Review


OK
And you thought a Carmen Electra movie couldn't be great. Okay, great is a stretch, but Mating Habits is hardly awful. Presented as a faux documentary for otherworldly types about American dating and mating rituals -- and narrated by David Hyde Pierce -- the premise gets old after five minutes, but throws in (a) enough jokes and (b) enough shots of Electra's chest to make it at least mediocre. I'd give 'em points for originality if it weren't for that Garry Shandling movie....

How To Deal Review


OK

Having seen her parents divorced, her pouty perfectionist sister engaged to a bland country-club preppie and her knocked-up best friend suffer a terrible romantic tragedy, Halley Martin is one high school girl very wary of love.

As played by pop- princess- cum- promising- actress Mandy Moore, she's also a credible Everyteen with a good head on her shoulders, which is what makes her determination to guard her heart a sound basis for "How to Deal," a fluffy slice-of-teen-life drama that strives to raise the bar a little for its often eye-rolling genre.

Adapted from the youth novels "Someone Like You" and "That Summer" by Sarah Dessen, the film is an admirable step up from the superficial, soundtrack-driven tripe usually targeted to the MTV demographic, and Moore's appealing, unaffected authenticity buttresses the story in its weaker passages.

Continue reading: How To Deal Review

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Mackenzie Astin Movies

Do You Take This Man? Trailer

Do You Take This Man? Trailer

Daniel (Anthony Rapp) and Christopher (Jonathan Bennett) are a gay couple preparing for their wedding....

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The Zeros Movie Review

The Zeros Movie Review

A wry and independent black comedy, The Zeros turns the road trip inside out with...

How To Deal Movie Review

How To Deal Movie Review

Having seen her parents divorced, her pouty perfectionist sister engaged to a bland country-club preppie...

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