M. Emmet Walsh

M. Emmet Walsh

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The Iron Giant Trailer


Hogarth Hughes is an intelligent young boy with a love of exploring. One day, his adventurous nature leads him to discover a colossal iron giant living in the forest having fallen from space. The robot appears to have the understanding of a child and thus finds himself vulnerable to the dangers of the earth and oblivious to his fate should the government find out about him. When Hogarth realises this and that the iron giant just wants to be his friend, he does everything within his power to keep him safe, even if that means lying to the government agents and army officials who come sniffing around for information. Hogarth is just 9-years-old, but he finds himself having to explain the way the world works to this confused creature, including mortality, sacrifice and the rules of right and wrong.

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Arthur & Mike Trailer


Wallace Avery is struggling with the hardships that life is throwing at him; a boring job, a failed marriage, an estranged son and an unfulfilling relationship; and decides that something must be done in order for him to find happiness again. He fakes his own drowning and purchases a new identity, becoming golf pro Arthur Newman and landing himself a job at a golf club away from Florida. It's then he meets Michaela "Mike", who is actually named Charlotte Fitzgerald and has assumed the identity of her twin sister who's suffering from mental health problems. They set out on a road trip together to Indiana but it isn't long before they both discover each other's true identities. With that in common, their bond strengthens and a romance blossoms as they take comfort in each other's dissatisfactions in life. But when it comes down to it, this couple have some serious decisions to make about the kind of people they really want to be.

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Calvary Review


Excellent

After the 2011 black comedy The Guard, Brendan Gleeson reteams with writer-director John Michael McDonagh for a darker comical drama grappling with issues of faith and forgiveness. McDonagh's usual jagged dialogue and snappy characters are on-hand in abundance while the film digs deep through a rather meandering, episodic plot.

In rural Ireland, Father James (Brendan Gleeson) is quietly enduring confessionals when one of his parishioners says he's going to kill him next Sunday. Shaken, James begins to explore his faith and mortality over the coming week. His daughter Fiona (Kelly Reilly) arrives following another suicide attempt, and he consoles a grieving French visitor (Marie-Josee Croze) and visits an imprisoned killer (Domhnall Gleeson). But almost anyone in the village could be the aspiring murderer: the over-emotional butcher (Chris O'Dowd), drug-addict doctor (Aidan Gillen), ladies-man African (Isaach De Bankole), shifty millionaire (Dylan Moran), eccentric fisherman (M. Emmet Walsh).

Intriguingly, it never really matters who issued the threat (James has a pretty good idea), because that's not the point of the film. McDonagh is exploring bigger ideas here, adeptly mixing riotously funny dialogue with startlingly bleak emotions. The film's languid pace nearly lulls us to sleep, then wakes us up with another sparky scene-stealing performance from the gifted cast. Gleeson is wonderfully muted, expressing more with an exhausted sigh than most actors can manage with a Shakespearean monologue. His moments with Reilly crackle with honest emotion, and the deceptively simple scene between father and son actors Brendan and Domhnall is a heart-stopper.

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M. Emmet Walsh - 2014 Film Independent Spirit Awards Nominee Brunch - West Hollywood, California, United States - Saturday 11th January 2014

M. Emmet Walsh

The Odd Life of Timothy Green Trailer


Cindy and Jim Green is a young, married couple who are looking forward to starting a family. They try everything they can but it doesn't work. After the couple find out they can never conceive, it leaves them devastated.

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Youth In Revolt Review


Weak
Maybe this would work if you saw it before any other Michael Cera movies. Or any other quirky, over-written rom-coms. But after all that have gone before, this feels strangely awkward and unconvincing. And rather insufferably smug.

Nick Twisp (Cera) is a 16-year-old who feels out of sync with the world. He has a summer job in a caravan park, where he instantly falls in love with Sheeni (Doubleday), the fiercely protected daughter of religious nutcases (Walsh and Place). Sheeni is like a female version of him, only sexy and smarter, and he creates an imaginary alter ego named Francois Dillinger to give him the confidence to seduce her. But of course things go wrong from the start.

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Fletch Review


Very Good
If you were in junior high or high school when Fletch came out, the movie holds enormous nostalgia value, particularly if you also happened to live in L.A. at the time (like me). Fletch revealed the L.A. that its denizens knew well -- the grungy beaches, the sun-cracked streets, the drab apartment buildings. Fletch's Lakers fetish, and the offices of the Los Angeles Times-like newspaper where he worked completed the L.A. milieu that audiences here immediately hooked into. What's more, we got Chevy Chase at his wise-ass best, in a crime caper tailored to the Beverly Hills Cop crowd (of which I was an admiring member), and thrumming with Harold Faltermeyer on the soundtrack. Sure, Faltermeyer's synthesizers sound supremely cheesy today, but this was the '80s, man. And nothing speaks the '80s like Faltermeyer's Casio keyboards, tuneful yet pulsing with that moneyed urban vibe; I think of it as the safe, consumer-friendly edge of high '80s decadence.

On first viewing (the movie's opening weekend), I admit I didn't get all of Fletch's jokes, but found myself pleasantly amused. Twenty-two years later, I get all the jokes, but I remain only pleasantly amused, nothing more, nothing less. This is a comfort movie -- smart and sassy enough to make good company, but a notch short of brilliant.

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Narrow Margin (1990) Review


Good
It was an odd choice to remake a mediocre 1950s noir, but at least Gene Hackman is engaging as ever in the leading role, however slightly written it is. The cat-and-mouse game of the original is largely intact, with mobsters chasing after a woman (Anne Archer) who witnessed a murder, but whom they've never actually seen. Oh... and it's all on a train bound for Vancouver, which is, I guess, what the title vaguely alludes to. The film tragically never generates a lot of suspense, and Hackman and Archer never really generate much chemistry. The best part of the film is the very beginning, when Archer witnesses the murder of an all-too-briefly-appearing J.T. Walsh.

The Iron Giant Review


Very Good
In the early days of animation, Warner Brothers cartoons spawned out of a desire to displace the overtly conservative and often sappy Disney characters. Bugs, Daffy, and Porky Pig were a little more rambunctious, daring, and raunchy than their Disney counterparts setting a new trend in children's entertainment that was widely accepted. While Disney is still king of the animated feature film (The Lion King, The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast) the Warner Brothers product seems to be a bit less inhibited with it's brand of humor, (Space Jam) appealing to both children and adults. The Iron Giant is just this kind of fun. It's a movie that the kids are going to love, which is complemented with adult humor and themes for the rest of the audience to appreciate.

Set in 1957, young Hogarth Hughes (Eli Marienthal) is fascinated with the lore of an old fisherman who declares that he has seen a UFO crash and a giant creature emerge from the ocean. Against his mother's (Jennifer Aniston) wishes, Hughes searches the forest surrounding his hometown of Rockwell, Maine until he finds and rescues the 50-foot robot-like-creature being shocked to death after an attempt to eat a power plant. The two become friends and with the help of junk-yard owner/artist/beatnik Dean McCoppin (Harry Connick Jr.) they manage to hide the giant from the rest of the town. This becomes increasingly difficult because of the giant's voracious appetite for metal and the presence of Government Agent Chuck Mansley (Christopher McDonald) who keeps snooping around town trying to learn more about this mysterious giant robot that locals keep reporting. The giant can't stay hidden for long and when it is finally discovered a climactic conclusion ensues.

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Wild Wild West Review


Weak

It is readily apparent that Will Smith, Kevin Kline and Kenneth Branagh had a ball on the set of "Wild Wild West."

Smith -- playing gun-slinging government agent Jim West -- looks so cool in his leather pants, waistcoat, and bolero jacket and hat, that at one point in the movie he's standing next to the voluptuous and nearly naked Salma Hayek (in a largely ornamental role), and your eyes are drawn to him. It's gotta be fun to look that slick.

Kline gets to play government agent Artemus Gordon, an eccentric inventor and master of disguise, which is right up his alley. He can barely keep from cracking himself up in his introductory scene, vamping around in saloon matron drag and pancake makeup.

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Christmas With The Kranks Review


Zero

As I write this, the time is 8:32 p.m. on Thursday, November 18, 2004, and I have just walked out on "Christmas With the Kranks" after roughly 45 minutes of mind-numbingly humorless, sit-com barrel-bottom idiocy.

An adaptation of John Grisham's "Skipping Christmas" that has been violently stripped of any semblance of humanity, this supposed comedy is about a couple called the Kranks (ha, ha, ha), played by Tim Allen and Jamie Lee Curtis, whose daughter won't be home for Christmas, so they choose to bow out of the festivities altogether and take a cruise. But apparently their choice amounts to a social offense of the first order in the bogus, plot-device suburbia where the movie takes place (during a transparently bogus winter). It even makes the newspaper.

Soon an army of neighbors are beating down their door like some Yuletide Gestapo, angrily demanding they put up their seasonal decorations while Curtis inexplicably cowers inside like a child.

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M. Emmet Walsh

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M. Emmet Walsh Movies

The Iron Giant Trailer

The Iron Giant Trailer

Hogarth Hughes is an intelligent young boy with a love of exploring. One day, his...

Arthur & Mike Trailer

Arthur & Mike Trailer

Wallace Avery is struggling with the hardships that life is throwing at him; a boring...

Calvary Movie Review

Calvary Movie Review

After the 2011 black comedy The Guard, Brendan Gleeson reteams with writer-director John Michael McDonagh...

The Odd Life of Timothy Green Trailer

The Odd Life of Timothy Green Trailer

Cindy and Jim Green is a young, married couple who are looking forward to starting...

Youth in Revolt Movie Review

Youth in Revolt Movie Review

Maybe this would work if you saw it before any other Michael Cera movies. Or...

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The Iron Giant Movie Review

The Iron Giant Movie Review

In the early days of animation, Warner Brothers cartoons spawned out of a desire to...

The Iron Giant Movie Review

The Iron Giant Movie Review

In the early days of animation, Warner Brothers cartoons spawned out of a desire to...

Blood Simple Movie Review

Blood Simple Movie Review

The year is 1984. Reagan is looking forward to four more years as president. Orwell's...

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