Lynn Redgrave

Lynn Redgrave

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Picture - Lynn Redgrave New York City, USA, Monday 11th January 2010

Lynn Redgrave Monday 11th January 2010 2009 New York Film Critics Circle Awards at Crimson - Inside Arrivals New York City, USA

Lynn Redgrave
Lynn Redgrave

Picture - Lynn Redgrave Washington DC, USA, Sunday 7th December 2008

Lynn Redgrave Sunday 7th December 2008 The Kennedy Center Honors held their annual morning brunch in the Cafe of the Mandarin Oriental Hotel Washington DC, USA

Picture - Lynn Redgrave New York City, USA, Thursday 13th November 2008

Lynn Redgrave and Billy Elliot Thursday 13th November 2008 Opening Night After Party for 'Billy Elliot The Musical' held at 608 West 28th St. New York City, USA

Lynn Redgrave and Billy Elliot

The White Countess Review


Good
Audiences can expect one thing from the filmmaking team of Ismail Merchant and James Ivory: a Merchant Ivory film isn't meant to be watched, like other movies; it's meant to be visited, like a museum. While the results are sometimes dazzling and rich, and at others times stuffy and inert, the Merchant Ivory approach is nonetheless consistent. Each of their scripts lies somewhere between screenplay and novel. The attention they pay to period detail is lavish. And a Merchant Ivory cast typically reads like a roster of the world's leading thespians. Their most recent effort, The White Countess, is no different.

In it, all the Merchant Ivory hallmarks are present. The stalwart cast is led by Ralph Fiennes and a trio of Redgraves: Vanessa Redgrave, Lynn Redgrave, and Natasha Richardson, Vanessa Redgrave's daughter. The setting -- Shanghai in the period leading up to the Sino-Japanese War of 1937-1945 -- is lush and meticulously rendered. And the script, loosely adapted from Junichiro Tanizaki's novel The Diary of a Mad Old Man, was penned by acclaimed writer Kazuo Ishiguro.

Continue reading: The White Countess Review

The White Countess Review


Good
Audiences can expect one thing from the filmmaking team of Ismail Merchant and James Ivory: a Merchant Ivory film isn't meant to be watched, like other movies; it's meant to be visited, like a museum. While the results are sometimes dazzling and rich, and at others times stuffy and inert, the Merchant Ivory approach is nonetheless consistent. Each of their scripts lies somewhere between screenplay and novel. The attention they pay to period detail is lavish. And a Merchant Ivory cast typically reads like a roster of the world's leading thespians. Their most recent effort, The White Countess, is no different.

In it, all the Merchant Ivory hallmarks are present. The stalwart cast is led by Ralph Fiennes and a trio of Redgraves: Vanessa Redgrave, Lynn Redgrave, and Natasha Richardson, Vanessa Redgrave's daughter. The setting -- Shanghai in the period leading up to the Sino-Japanese War of 1937-1945 -- is lush and meticulously rendered. And the script, loosely adapted from Junichiro Tanizaki's novel The Diary of a Mad Old Man, was penned by acclaimed writer Kazuo Ishiguro.

Continue reading: The White Countess Review

Everything You Always Wanted To Know About Sex * But Were Afraid To Ask Review


Excellent
A minor classic and Woody Allen's most absurd film ever, this series of seven short vignettes is worth a look for its '70s fueled humor and sex-crazed hysterics. Based on (well, not really -- inspired by, let's say) the watershed book, Allen indulges in homages to everyone from Scorsese to Kubrick to Fellini, with stops along the way for his traditional neurotic filmmaking style. The stories are goofs on cross-dressing, beastiality, sex in public, and more. Perhaps the most notorious moment involves an enormous breast rampaging the countryside, and the "What's My Perversion?" sketch (a riff on What's My Line?, starring Jack Barry as himself) is classic. Pricelessly ridiculous.

Shine Review


Excellent
In Hollywood, you just can't make a movie like Shine. Put simply, it is just not allowed.

This is our loss and Australia's gain, because Shine comes off as one of the upper-echelon films of the year, an ambitious and unflinching look at that country's David Helfgott, a prodigy of a pianist driven insane by his father, only to emerge again after 20 years of institutionalization.

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The Wild Thornberrys Movie Review


Excellent
Considering that I have not watched a Nickelodeon show since Double Dare, I didn't know what to expect from The Wild Thornberrys Movie, based on a popular cartoon from the network. Surprisingly, the film is a hilarious adventure and I shamelessly enjoyed it. The primary audience for this one is kids 12 and under, but directors Cathy Malkasian and Jeff McGrath really took big kids like me into consideration when they put this animated extravaganza together. It features a fantastic score composed by Paul Simon, appropriate to its sub-Saharan setting and is accompanied by a splendid new song from The Dave Matthews Band. Its progressive themes of ecological preservation and racial tolerance also add to the warm tingly nostalgic feeling of the film, but it never gets too cheesy. Let's just say that the Disneyfication of this one is kept to a minimum. It even has a PG rating.

The story follows the Thornberrys, a hodge-podge British family of three generations all living in one souped-up trailer home, as they travel throughout the world documenting nature's wonders. Our protagonist is young Eliza (Lacey Chabert), who has been given a magical gift to talk to animals. Eliza is the quintessential loner, as she is more content with her animal friends than her family's rules and constantly seeks adventure. Along with her chimpanzee companion Darwin (Tom Kane), she manages to get into trouble when she recklessly takes the baby cheetah Akela past the safe boundaries of the desert. Sure enough, malicious poachers snatch up Akela from a helicopter, and despite Eliza's heroic efforts, she's unable to save the cub. Heartbroken and facing rebuke from her bewildered parents, Eliza is shipped off to boarding in school in England. Trapped in the confines of "civilization," Eliza vows to find the lost cheetah cub and to return to her family where she rightfully belongs.

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How to Kill Your Neighbor's Dog Review


Weak
A mildly amusing Kenneth Branagh starrer has Branagh as a Woody Allen-esque playwright living in the wrong damn town (Los Angeles), where he suffers through noisy neighbors and bad actors who mangle his erstwhile perfect dialogue. On a voyage of self-discovery, he learns a little something about humanity, of course. Like I said, mildly amusing.

The Next Best Thing Review


Grim
Can it really have been two long years since The Object of My Affection made us laugh and cry with its tale of two best friends (an unlucky in love gal and her gay male roommate) and how they decide to have a baby together? Er... so we didn't laugh. And we didn't cry. And The Next Best Thing takes us there once again, with an even lamer attempt at making "The Oddest Couple Has a Baby."

Fortunately, The Next Best Thing covers very different ground than Affection. Unfortunately, that ground turns out to be providing a platform for Madonna to sing, to show off her yoga skills, and To Show You How Much She Can E-Mote During Her Di-A-Logue, all while affecting a slight (yet very pretentious) British accent. Get outta the way, people, Madonna's gonna act!!! And it isn't going to be pretty. (See also: Evita.)

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Unconditional Love Review


Grim
Great googly moogly, what have these filmmakers and stars gotten themselves into with Unconditional Love?

In a plot that I can only describe as inspired-by-peyote, Kathy Bates decides to head to rural Britain for the funeral of a murdered pop star after hubby Dan Aykroyd abruptly dumps her. Dressed in sequins and seen mainly in Six Feet Under-like flashbacks/materializations, Jonathon Pryce plays the pop star. As it turns out, pop star is gay and has left his estate to his lover (Rupert Everett). Bates and Everett then take it upon themselves to hunt down the murderer. What follows includes both Barry Manilow and Sally Jessy Raphael.

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Gods and Monsters Review


Excellent

It will probably be honored as a triumph of filmmaking (and indeed has already one the National Board of Review's Best Picture award), but while Gods and Monsters is a good film, it's really more of a curiosity than a legitimate masterpiece.

The adaptation of a fictionalized account of the final days of director Frank Whale (best known for directing the first two Frankenstein movies), director Condon's story is really a simple one, about Whale's infatuation with his gardner Clay (Fraser). That Whale is a not-so-in-the-closet homosexual is pretty clear up front, but for some reason, Clay can't figure that out.

What follows is a series of encounters between the two, the degeneration of Whale's mind thanks to a stroke, and, most curiously, one dream/fantasy sequence after another, wherein Whale relives his childhood, World War I, and his years in Hollywood.

The dream sequence, long known as the biggest crutch a screenwriter can use, works. At least part-way. Because Whale's mind is going south, we are asked to indulge his fantasies as near-reality for him. Like I say, this works, but only up to a point. After two hours, the device has grown stale and predictable.

Still, Gods is a truly good film with a great cast (McKellan and especially Redgrave, playing Whale's maid, both deserve serious praise), and what must have been a tricky adaptation of the novel on which it was based is also a feat unto itself.



A Whale of a tale.

All I Wanna Do Review


Weak
Dead Poets Society it ain't.

This lighthearted comedy features the Teenage Girl Class of 1998 in a silly prep school that is about to do the unthinkable: admit boys. Amidst the bulimia and the hair dye pranks, there's not much learnin' to be done so why not hatch a plan to get the boys banned for life? All this culminates in an obviously re-edited (the film has lost 20-some minutes of running time and has earned a new, meaningless title) strike with the gals taking over the school.

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Lynn Redgrave

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