Lynda Myles

Lynda Myles

Lynda Myles Quick Links

Film RSS

Killing Me Softly Review


Weak
Hey, remember when Joseph Fiennes was a big artsy star after Shakespeare in Love? No. Well, neither does he. Today you're more likely to find him in a film like this, a bizarre erotic thriller from Chen Kaige, best known as the director of a variety of Chinese historical epics. Killing Me Softly features Fiennes as a maybe-he's-a-creepy-rapist/maybe-he's-not kinda fellow, and Heather Graham is the woman who falls in love with him at first sight. What develops is a story about a lost mountain expedition (which Fiennes was part of), missing ex-girlfriends, and lots of blind clues (think typewritten letters shoved under the door) that suggest Fiennes is a really bad dude. In the end the film comes across like a kind of cheap knockoff of Basic Instinct, right down to the string-heavy score. Fiennes even has a taste for kinky sex, and as a fearful Graham is tied to the kitchen table she says, "Sometimes I feel like I don't know you." It's pretty campy-silly, but it's surprisingly watchable for some reason, maybe because of the name-brand actors sleazing it in this Skinemax would-be classic. Who knows. Just check out the unrated edition for extra fun.

When Brendan Met Trudy Review


Excellent
Harry, Sally: You've been replaced.

One of the liveliest comedies to come along in a decade, When Brendan Met Trudy is an imported riot that messes with the romantic comedy genre in such a way that it might never recover. And I mean that in a good way.

Continue reading: When Brendan Met Trudy Review

The Commitments Review


Good
Released in 1991, The Commitments was Alan Parker's third film about pop music. His first, Fame, was a frothy coming-of-age-musical that made the most of its youthful enthusiasm despite a disease-of-the-week-style script. The second, Pink Floyd: The Wall, was a depressive, insular, and angular pastiche of moody myth-making that was interesting mainly for people who fried their brains listening to "Shine on You Crazy Diamond" a hundred times too often. The Commitments sits somewhere in the middle: An engaging, open-hearted entertainment that pulls off two neat tricks. First, it's one of the few movies about rock-pop-soul music that seems to have the right idea about why and how bands come together, with some fine performances from rank amateurs. But more impressively, it finds some great humor in a setting that's defined by grinding poverty.

The setting is North Dublin, where Jimmy Rabbite (Robert Arkins) is trying to simultaneously shrug off his parents' bad taste and the dole-driven life that surrounds him. Jimmy carries a deep and abiding love for soul music of the pre-Motown era - Wilson Pickett, Jackie Wilson, and so on - though he understandably has a hard time convincing his friends and family that soul isn't an exclusively black music. In a video store, Jimmy plays old-school soul tapes to the unbelievers before uttering the film's funniest and most poignant line: "The Irish are the blacks of Europe. Dubliners are the blacks of Ireland. North Dubliners are the blacks of Dublin."

Continue reading: The Commitments Review

Lynda Myles

Lynda Myles Quick Links

Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Filmmaker


Suggested

Trumbo - Review

Trumbo - Review

In 1947, Dalton (Bryan Cranston) is the film industry's top-paid screenwriter, so of course the House Un-American Activities Commission goes after...

Pride And Prejudice And Zombies Was A New Kind Of Costume Drama For Lily James

Pride And Prejudice And Zombies Was A New Kind Of Costume Drama For Lily James

Seth Grahame-Smith's Pride and Prejudice and Zombies graphic novel has been made into a film.

Sir Elton John Surprises London Commuters With Early Morning St. Pancras Performance

Sir Elton John Surprises London Commuters With Early Morning St. Pancras Performance

Sir Elton's new album, 'Wonderful Crazy Night', came out the next day.

Coldplay And Beyonce's 'Hymn For The Weekend' Video Accused Of Cultural Insensitivity

Coldplay And Beyonce's 'Hymn For The Weekend' Video Accused Of Cultural Insensitivity

The video for 'Hymn For the Weekend' was filmed in Mumbai, India.

Advertisement
'Orange Is The New Black' Adds Three Years To Its Netflix Sentence

'Orange Is The New Black' Adds Three Years To Its Netflix Sentence

Three more seasons to go for this adored comedy.

Matt LeBlanc

Matt LeBlanc "Couldn't Believe" The Response To His 'Top Gear' Appointment

LeBlanc was announced as one of Chris Evans' co-hosts on the brand new 'Top Gear' on Thursday.

Fun Lovin' Criminals - Come Find Yourself (20th Anniversary Edition) Album Review

Fun Lovin' Criminals - Come Find Yourself (20th Anniversary Edition) Album Review

New York trio Fun Lovin' Criminals first made an impact back in 1996 with the release of their since acclaimed debut LP Come Find Yourself.

Goosebumps - Review

Goosebumps - Review

This lively romp is entertaining enough to amuse the audience even when it veers off the rails.

Advertisement
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.