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Photo Call for New Play: Too Much Too Much Too Many

Luke Kirby and Rebecca Henderson - Photo Call for New Play: Too Much Too Much Too Many, held at the Roundabout Theatre. - New York, NY, United States - Thursday 10th October 2013

Sheryl Kaller, Luke Kirby, Rebecca Henderson, Phyllis Somerville, James Rebhorn and Meghan Kennedy
Luke Kirby, Rebecca Henderson, Phyllis Somerville and James Rebhorn
Luke Kirby, Rebecca Henderson, Phyllis Somerville and James Rebhorn
Luke Kirby, Sheryl Kaller, Rebecca Henderson, Phyllis Somerville, James Rebhorn and Meghan Kennedy
Luke Kirby and Rebecca Henderson

Mania Days film set

Katie Holmes and Luke Kirby - Katie Holmes and Luke Kirby filming 'Mania Days' in the fountain of Washington Square Park in New York City - New York, NY, United States - Tuesday 21st May 2013

Katie Holmes
Katie Holmes and Luke Kirby
Katie Holmes and Luke Kirby
Katie Holmes
Katie Holmes and Luke Kirby

the set of 'Mania Days'

Katie Holmes and Luke Kirby - Luke Kirby and Katie Holmes are seen on the set of 'Mania Days' in Washington Square Park in New York City - New York City, NY, United States - Tuesday 21st May 2013

Katie Holmes
Katie Holmes
Katie Holmes
Katie Holmes
Katie Holmes

Katie Holmes and Luke Kirby filming 'Mania Days' in the fountain of Washington Square Park

Katie Holmes and Luke Kirby - Katie Holmes and Luke Kirby filming 'Mania Days' in the fountain of Washington Square Park - New York, NY, United States - Tuesday 21st May 2013

Katie Holmes
Katie Holmes and Luke Kirby
Katie Holmes
Katie Holmes
Katie Holmes

Take This Waltz Review


Excellent
After the remarkable Away From Her, actress-turned-filmmaker Polley is back with another bracingly observant drama, this time exploring the point where relationships cease to be something new. The film is a bit indulgent and downbeat, but it speaks so eloquently that we can't help but be moved.

In Toronto, Margot (Williams) is happily married to Lou (Rogen), but she feels that their relationship is only expressed through humour and that work interests divide them. So it's not surprising that, after a chance encounter with neighbour Daniel (Kirby), Margot starts to consider straying from her marriage. She holds Daniel at arm's length, but is intrigued by everything that's new about him, including his more adult way of talking about sex and relationships. Is taking this leap scarier than waiting around for her marriage to come back to life?

Continue reading: Take This Waltz Review

Special screening of 'Take This Waltz' at the Sunshine Landmark - Arrivals

Michelle Williams and Luke Kirby - Michelle Williams and Luke Kirby Thursday 21st June 2012 Special screening of 'Take This Waltz' at the Sunshine Landmark - Arrivals

Michelle Williams and Luke Kirby

Fury [aka The Samaritan] Review


Good
Set in Toronto, this noir thriller gets under the skin due to layered performances from the entire cast. It's a slow build until the final act, but it remains gripping thanks to a snaky plot that gets nastier and scarier as it develops.

After 25 years in prison, con-artist Foley (Jackson) decides to change his life. All his old friends are gone, and his best pal's son Ethan (Kirby) now works for vicious businessman Xavier (Wilkinson). But Ethan brings back the issues Foley is trying to put behind him. Worse, Ethan needs Foley's help for a "samaritan" grift, which involves coming to the aid of the mark to win his trust. Then Foley meets vulnerable young call-girl Iris (Negga), who manages to get under his skin.

Continue reading: Fury [aka The Samaritan] Review

Take This Waltz Trailer


When Margot and Daniel meet on a plane, they have an immediate connection; their chemistry is intense and they can't shake off the feeling that they've met before. This movies isn't your ten a penny love story though as Margot is happily married to Lou, a cookbook writer. However when it turns out that rickshaw driver Daniel lives on the same street as the happy couple and begins to regularly pop up in Margot's daily routine when back home, their intensity blossoms and throws the certainty of Margot and Lou's domestic life into question. Call it destiny, whimsy or coincidence; the two begin to lust for one another more and more after their aeronautical meeting and this love triangle becomes an extremely passionate affair.

Continue: Take This Waltz Trailer

Mambo Italiano Review


Good
The only thing worse than being simultaneously gay and Italian, it seems, is... well... apparently nothing is worse than being both gay and Italian. Across this thin thread, the story of Mambo Italiano is strung. You see, Angelo is Italian. And gay. And that, if you follow me, is bad.

Still with me? Good. Now you're fully equipped to grasp the dramatic tension of this comedic enterprise from EdTV writer Émile Gaudreault. If you're getting the sense that this is a flimsy flick, you're right on target. This movie falls into the classic trap of reducing the depth and complexity of one culture to its lowest common denominator in an effort to liberate another culture from stereotype.

Continue reading: Mambo Italiano Review

Shattered Glass Review


OK

Exponentially more talented than he's gotten credit for as Anakin Skywalker in "Attack of the Clones," Hayden Christensen has made savvy dramatic choices over the last few years to counterbalance the wooden acting forced upon him by George Lucas.

As the resentful, self-loathing punk son of terminally-ill Kevin Kline in 2001's "Life as a House," he left that forgotten movie's most lasting impression, and now in "Shattered Glass" he absolutely shines as a real-life star reporter for The New Republic in the late 1990s whose ditheringly wholesome but needy, self-effacing humility hid a compulsive urge to fabricate, fabricate, fabricate.

Stephen Glass was the over-eager young journalist's name, and of his 41 often startling, exposé-style stories for the influential Washington, D.C., magazine, 27 were pure bull pucky. Yet through Christensen's economical soft-shoe performance, Glass's zeal and obliging modesty work the same disarming hoodoo on the viewer as they do on his snake-oiled co-workers.

Continue reading: Shattered Glass Review

Halloween: Resurrection Review


Grim

Trying to breath a little "Blair Witch"/reality TV life into a horror franchise that has been on creative life-support for over 20 years, "Halloween: Resurrection" features masked psycho Michael Meyers going Ginsu on a bunch of teenagers (no, really?) who spend the night in his dilapidated childhood home as part of a live internet broadcast called "Dangertainment."

The college kids vying for tuition money wear headsets with little cameras in them so we can see their point of view as they get hacked to death, and one of the program's producers (played by over-acting, incessantly yapping hip-hop star Busta Rhymes) dresses up as Michael Meyers to give the kids a scare, not knowing the real dude is in da house. But while this camera gimmick is put to good use once the bodies start piling up, the movie fails in several other ways -- not the least of which is that it's never even a little bit scary.

The picture opens with a prologue that includes perpetual franchise victim Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis, making her final appearance in the series) locked in a sanitarium so explanations can be offered for how Mike is back after she beheaded him at the end of 1998's "Halloween: H20." (What isn't explained is the absence of Laurie's son, played by the now too-hot-for-horror Josh Hartnett in "H20.")

Continue reading: Halloween: Resurrection Review

Luke Kirby

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