Luke De Woolfson

Luke De Woolfson

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Forget Me Not Review


Very Good
Reminiscent of all-night encounter movies like Before Sunrise or In Search of a Midnight Kiss, this British drama has a terrific blast of honest humour and sharp music to undercut its somewhat sad tone. And like Once, it charms us along the way.

Lonely and drunk in central London, Will (Menzies) contemplates suicide but is distracted when he sees his local barmaid Eve (O'Reilly) being mugged. He rescues her, but it takes a little while for them to let down their outer shells, relax and start talking. When he offers to walk her home, she invites him to a party, but over the course of the night, thoughts of death are never far from his mind. As morning dawns, they seem to be starting some sort of relationship.

Continue reading: Forget Me Not Review

Mr Right Review


OK
This is a shallow, superficial film about shallow, superficial people. It's nicely shot and features some strong performances, but as it tries to be both racy and moralistic, it won't satisfy many audiences.

Louise (Zaris) is a lively Londoner with a collection of gay pals. Her best mate is Alex (de Woolfson), a wannabe actor stuck in a catering job and a happy-but-wobbly relationship with TV producer Harry (Lance). William (Marshall) is an antiques expert with a petulant actor boyfriend, Lawrence (Ockenden), while wealthy artist Tom (Morris) shacks up with toyboy hunk Larrs (Hart). Naturally, Louise's new boyfriend Paul (Edwards) is nervous about meeting this sassy, snappy crowd. But if he's Mr Right, he'll have to live in Louise's world.

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Stoned Review


Good
The Rolling Stones' founder Brian Jones' drowning death in 1969 is another check mark in that long list of rock 'n' roll artists who died early and in their prime. His legacy as a musical genius aside, Jones is also remembered for his sartorial flamboyance and for his quintessential rocker's lifestyle of drugs, booze, and sex, all in big gulps.

It's at the shit end of excess that we find Jones (Leo Gregory) in Stephen Woolley's directorial debut, Stoned, which explores the rocker's final days, after he's alienated himself from his band, leading up to his mysterious drowning in the swimming pool of his country estate. Officially, the death was ruled an accident, but loose ends linger off the record, particularly with regard to Jones's relationship with Stones' manager, Tom Keylock (David Morrissey), and Frank Thorogood (Paddy Considine), a builder contracted to remodel Jones's estate. Woolley's movie runs on the notion that Thorogood was no mere working-class lackey, but a mole of sorts, employed by the Stones organization to keep daily tabs on Jones's erratic behavior.

Continue reading: Stoned Review

Late Night Shopping Review


Good
Oddly enough, there's little shopping at all in Late Night Shopping. How could there be? The four Brits whom the film resolves around all work at night -- so obviously they'd have to do their shopping during the day.

That little inconsistency is only the first of hundreds you'll find in this virtually unseen flick, which features some engaging characters and performances but blows it all with a script that alternates between illogical and just plain dumb.

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The Reckoning Review


Weak

In "The Reckoning," a troupe of 14th century traveling actors abandon their standard Bible-story fare while visiting a small fiefdom in order to reenact the recent murder of a local boy, and discover in the process that the official version of events is a cover-up for something far more disconcerting.

Having an outsiders' perspective, the players can sense something amiss with the local Church-based justice, and one of their number -- himself a disgraced priest on the run played by Paul Bettany -- feels compelled to investigate. A mute, wild-woman healer (and thus a suspected witch) is scheduled to hang for the crime, but what he discovers leads the actors to risk their lives to expose the truth by presenting a play based on the facts.

Unfortunately, writer Mark Mills (who adapted Barry Unsworth's novel "Morality Play") and director Paul McGuigan utterly fail to address one fundamental problem with their story: What makes them think the people of this village would pay to see the still-fresh horror of a child's brutal murder fictionalized for them like some Middle-Ages Movie of the Week?

Continue reading: The Reckoning Review

Luke De Woolfson

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Luke De Woolfson Movies

Forget Me Not Movie Review

Forget Me Not Movie Review

Reminiscent of all-night encounter movies like Before Sunrise or In Search of a Midnight Kiss,...

Shank Trailer

Shank Trailer

Watch the trailer for Shank Set in London 2015, the scene is very different to...

Mr Right Movie Review

Mr Right Movie Review

This is a shallow, superficial film about shallow, superficial people. It's nicely shot and features...

Stoned Movie Review

Stoned Movie Review

The Rolling Stones' founder Brian Jones' drowning death in 1969 is another check mark in...

The Reckoning Movie Review

The Reckoning Movie Review

In "The Reckoning," a troupe of 14th century traveling actors abandon their standard Bible-story fare...

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