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Lukas Haas - Lukas Haas visits The Grove with a friend on a sunny day in Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 19th March 2016

Lukas Haas
Lukas Haas
Lukas Haas

Lukas Haas - The Revenant UK Film Premiere at the Empire, Leicester Square, London - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 14th January 2016

Lukas Haas

Lukas Haas - The Revenant UK Film Premiere at the Empire, Leicester Square, London at Empire, Leicester Square - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 14th January 2016

Lukas Haas
Lukas Haas

Lucas Haas - 'The Revenant' U.K. Premiere - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 14th January 2016

Lucas Haas
Paul Anderson and Lukas Haas
Paul Anderson and Lukas Haas
Paul Anderson and Lukas Haas
Paul Anderson and Lukas Haas

Lukas Haas - Lukas Haas out and about running errands wearing a trilby hat, jacket, jeans and white sneakers at beverly hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 21st December 2015

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Lukas Haas - Lukas Haas having lunch at Ebaldi restaurant in Beverly Hills at beverly hills - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Friday 27th November 2015

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Lukas Haas - Lukas Haas sitting on a shop window ledge in Beverly Hills talking to friends at beverly hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 20th October 2015

Lukas Haas
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Lukas Haas
Lukas Haas
Lukas Haas
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Lukas Haas - Lukas Haas dressed in army fatigues out and about in Beverly Hills walking with his hands in his pockets at beverly hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 9th September 2015

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Lukas Haas
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Lukas Haas - Lukas Haas goes shopping in Beverly Hills - Hollywood, California, United States - Wednesday 2nd September 2015

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Lukas Haas
Lukas Haas

Lukas Haas - Lukas Haas shops in Beverly Hills and changes his t-shirt half way through his trip at beverly hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 26th August 2015

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Lukas Haas

Red Riding Hood Review


OK
Just nutty enough to be entertaining, this fairy tale would have benefitted from a more arch, energetic approach. It feels like a mopey medieval Twilight flashback livened up by the odd bit of overacting.

In a village on the edge of a dark forest, Valerie (Seyfried) lives with her loving parents (Burke and Madsen), who have arranged her marriage to the cute, soulful and wealthy blacksmith Henry (Irons). But Valerie's in love with the swarthy, soulful and poor woodcutter Peter (Fernandez). Valerie's big-eyed grandmother (Christie) offers a listening ear. But the village's strained relationship with a local werewolf flares into violence at the arrival of both a blood-red moon and the fanatical werewolf-hunter Solomon (Oldman). Could the werewolf be one of the villagers?

Continue reading: Red Riding Hood Review

Red Riding Hood Trailer


Valerie is a young woman who lives in a village that has been haunted by a terrible curse, a werewolf lives in the surrounding woods and although the villagers have managed to keep his killing at bay -by providing an animal sacrifice each month- they still live with a thought of terror knowing that the wolf might once again kill a human.

Continue: Red Riding Hood Trailer

The Darwin Awards Review


Good
Poor Finn Taylor can't catch a break. By all reports he's the nicest guy in the world, and he typically toils for three or four years on each indie flick he directs. When they finally hit the screen they flop. His last outing, Cherish, was a bizarre story about a cop falling in love with a girl under house arrest who he's assigned to watch. I guess it wasn't bizarre enough, though. I had to reread my review of it just to fully remember what it was about. Cherish bombed with a $180,000 gross.

Four years later, Taylor drops another oddball flick on us, and the trouble is obvious before frame one. For starters, the name of the movie is The Darwin Awards, which sounds like it's going to be a documentary about those nutty people who kill themselves doing stupid things, thus earning posthumous "Darwin Awards" (as written up in a series of books of the same name) for ridding the gene pool of their DNA.

Continue reading: The Darwin Awards Review

Brick Review


Very Good
It doesn't take long to notice that Brick is a film that feels entirely fresh and new. It hits you rather suddenly, a few minutes after the movie begins: Why are teenagers talking like they came out of a Dashiell Hammett novel?

That's the rub, folks: Brick, as best as you can describe it, is a postmodern mashup of a '90s teen drug drama and a '30s noir. The setup is quite straightforward: A girl named Emily (Emilie de Ravin) is dead, and her ex-boyfriend Brendan (Joseph Gordon-Levitt, who apparently can't get enough of the indie scene now) wants to find out what happened. He suspects foul play, and he launches an investigation, much like some renegade gumshoe might do, always evading the watchful eye of the chief. Only here, there's no chief, just a principal (Richard Roundtree, of all people). With the help of a brilliant colleague -- er, classmate -- Brendan starts digging into the underworld, such as it exists in a world of letter jackets and parking lot brawls. (Indeed, for all the talk of highschool, not a single class is actually attended in Brick.)

Continue reading: Brick Review

Breakfast Of Champions Review


Bad
The word "unfilmable" is often bandied about over cult classic books. That never stops people from filming them.

Witness The English Patient, which turned out to be filmable after all. And then there was Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, which wasn't. But maybe unfilmable is the wrong word. Breakfast of Champions might have proved filmable, but it sure isn't watchable.

Continue reading: Breakfast Of Champions Review

Last Days (2005) Review


Extraordinary
Completing a stylistic and thematic trilogy begun with 2003's Gerry and Elephant (and inspired by the work of Hungarian auteur Bela Tarr), Last Days finds director Gus Van Sant once again engaging in breathtaking experimentation with sound, image, and content. Just as Elephant was modeled after, but not a faithful depiction of, the Columbine high school shootings, so Van Sant's latest - charting the final hours of a reclusive, iconic rock star in his remote country mansion - is simultaneously about and not about Kurt Cobain, a hypothetical rumination on the deceased musician that shares with his preceding films a hypnotic sense of time and space, as well as a fascination with the prosaic moments proceeding death. Having turned his back on the staid narrative conventions of formulaic Hollywood dramas (including his own Finding Forrester and Good Will Hunting), Van Sant now embraces an avant-garde aesthetic concerned with finding truth through non-linear storytelling and a focus on environmental tone and texture, both of which are employed as a means of placing viewers in a particular physical and emotional "space." And with Last Days, this unorthodox filmmaking achieves a state of sublime cinematic nirvana.

"Teenage angst has paid off well / Now I'm bored and old," sang Cobain on Nirvana's Serve the Servants, and one can feel that infectious malaise throughout Van Sant's portrait of Blake (Michael Pitt), a grungy icon living out what a friend (Kim Gordon) dubs "a rock and roll cliché." Donning Cobain accoutrements such as a hunter's cap and a green-and-red sweater and sporting shoulder-length blond hair, Blake spends the film sleepwalking around his backwoods home and property with a mixture of drug-addled bewilderment and spiritual melancholy, and Pitt embodies this wayward soul - whose rambling exploits involve wearing a black spaghetti-strap dress and toting a rifle - with a hunched, drooping-to-the-floor sagginess (as if under tremendous strain) that's at odds with the actor's slender physique. His constantly incomprehensible muttering, such as during an amusing, chance encounter with a telephone book salesman (where the only audible Blake line is telling: "Success is subjective"), echoes Cobain's frequently indecipherable lyrics while also conveying a torturous emotional detachment. Trapped in Van Sant's constrictive full frame (employed to heighten the oppressive claustrophobia gripping the character), Pitt's Blake is a zombie who, as revealed by the film's opening scene - finding him symbolically baptizing himself in a tree-shrouded lake, and later whispering and then roaring "Home on the Range" to the empty nighttime forest - desperately seeks communion with the world around him.

Continue reading: Last Days (2005) Review

Witness Review


Excellent
The city cop struggles through an early breakfast with his temporary neighbors -- the Pennsylvania Amish. After a sip of coffee, he blurts out, "Honey, this is great coffee." His breakfast companions blankly stare. Awkwardly, he explains that it's from a commercial and continues eating. That single scene exemplifies why Witness is so good. It eschews easy payoffs and punch lines for well-rounded characters, quiet sequences that nearly bubble over with sexual unease, and intelligence.

Harrison Ford plays the cop, John Book, who heads to Lancaster County from Philadelphia after a young murder witness (Lucas Haas) identifies Book's colleague as the culprit, unveiling a departmental conspiracy. A wounded Book drives the boy and his mother (Kelly McGillis) to their farm before collapsing. With the car damaged and his superiors on the look out, Book is forced to stay with the Amish and live their lifestyle until he can get away.

Continue reading: Witness Review

Mars Attacks! Review


Weak
We've already had three movies based on TV shows this year, plus a film based on a TV commercial, but I think it's a really bad omen when a film is based on a series of trading cards.

The film is Mars Attacks!, and with it Tim Burton serves up the worst production of his once-blossoming career, a movie wherein he indulges every excess of his demented psyche, pays no attention to entertaining the audience, and recycles every joke he can get his hands on.

Continue reading: Mars Attacks! Review

Johns Review


Bad
A latter-day Midnight Cowboy? They wish. Often described as gritty and realistic, boring and predictable is more like it.

Music Box (1989) Review


Weak
Is daddy really a Nazi living under an assumed identity in America? In this impressively stupid collaboration between Costa-Gavras and Joe Eszterhas (you will not find a more unlikely pair since Oscar and Felix) we have to wait almost two hours to find out if Armin Mueller-Stahl is indeed the monster he's accused of being or if it's a Commie plot. The catch? Daughter Jessica Lange is defending him at a Nuremburg-style trial.

In the vein of Jagged Edge and Basic Instinct (all Eszterhas movies, actually), we're kept guessing as to whether hedunit, only in Music Box, we couldn't care less. If the characters aren't speaking in thick, phony accents, they're speaking in foreign languages altogether -- through long, drawn-out courtroom scenes where immigrants reflect hazily on whether Armin's our man.

Continue reading: Music Box (1989) Review

Boys Review


Bad
Twenty-five cents to the person who can explain what the point of this exercise was. The fetching Winona Ryder falls off a horse and Lukas Haas rescues her by taking her into his dorm at the all-boys prep school. Because she didn't want to go to the hospital. Haas decides he's in love so they run off to a carnival. And a car was stolen, and maybe Ryder had something to do with that. And John C. Reilly is the cop on the case! This disjointed review echoes perfectly what the sensibility of the film is: Virtually nil.
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Lukas Haas Movies

The Revenant Movie Review

The Revenant Movie Review

A wrenching saga of survival and revenge, Alejandro G. Inarritu's new epic is just as...

The Revenant - R Rated Trailer

The Revenant - R Rated Trailer

Hugh Glass is a skilled hunter, experienced in trapping some of the most predatory of...

Hustlers Trailer

Hustlers Trailer

The pawn shop is the last resort for most broke people; the place where the...

Jobs Trailer

Jobs Trailer

Steve Jobs founded Apple Inc. with his techie pal Steve Wozniak after leaving Reed College...

Jobs Trailer

Jobs Trailer

Steve Jobs is the late founder of Apple Inc. and who was a technological pioneer...

Contraband Movie Review

Contraband Movie Review

There isn't a single moment in this film that feels authentic, as cast and crew...

Contraband Trailer

Contraband Trailer

Chris Farraday used to lead a life of crime but that was before he met...

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Red Riding Hood Movie Review

Red Riding Hood Movie Review

Just nutty enough to be entertaining, this fairy tale would have benefitted from a more...

Red Riding Hood Trailer

Red Riding Hood Trailer

Valerie is a young woman who lives in a village that has been haunted by...

Inception Movie Review

Inception Movie Review

Nolan pulls us into another fiendishly entertaining scenario, engaging our brains while taking us on...

Material Girls Movie Review

Material Girls Movie Review

I confess a fascination -- perhaps unhealthy by definition -- with the actress/singer/empire Hilary Duff....

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