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Guest and Luis Guzman - The World Premiere of 'The Last Stand' shown at Grauman's Chinese Theatre Hollywood California United States Monday 14th January 2013

Guest and Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman and Grauman's Chinese Theatre
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Guest and Luis Guzman
Guest, Luis Guzman and Harvey Guillen

Luis Guzman, In and Blood - Luis Guzman on the set of 'In the Blood' Saturday 1st December 2012 Featuring: Luis Guzman Where: Santurce, Puerto Rico

Luis Guzman, In and Blood
Luis Guzman, In and Blood
Luis Guzman, In and Blood
Luis Guzman, In and Blood
Luis Guzman, In and Blood
Luis Guzman, In and Blood

Guest and Luis Guzman Tuesday 11th September 2012 New York Premiere of The Master at the Zigfield Theater

Guest and Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman

Luis Guzman - Actor Luis Guzman Tuesday 17th April 2012 seen at Fred Segal with a female companion

Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman

Luis Guzman and Grauman's Chinese Theatre Thursday 2nd February 2012 The Los Angeles Premiere of 'Journey 2: The Mysterious Island' held at The Grauman's Chinese Theatre - Arrivals

Luis Guzman - Temi Guzman and Luis Guzman New York City, USA - The Olevolos Project Fundraiser Brunch at La Cirque - Arrivals Saturday 21st May 2011

Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman

Luis Guzman, Greta Gerwig, Helen Mirren, Jennifer Garner and Russell Brand - Luis Guzman, Greta Gerwig, Russell Brand, Helen Mirren and Jennifer Garner Tuesday 5th April 2011 at Ziegfeld Theatre New York City, USA

Luis Guzman, Greta Gerwig, Helen Mirren, Jennifer Garner and Russell Brand
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman

Helen Mirren and Luis Guzman - Helen Mirren and Luis Guzman New York City, USA - on the set of the new film 'Arthur' Tuesday 3rd August 2010

Helen Mirren and Luis Guzman
Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
Russell Brand and Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren and Luis Guzman
Russell Brand and Helen Mirren

Luis Guzman and Brooke Shields - Luis Guzman and Brooke Shields Monday 2nd August 2010 New York Premiere of 'The Other Guys' held at Ziegfeld Theater

Luis Guzman and Brooke Shields
Luis Guzman and Brooke Shields

Luis Guzman Monday 2nd August 2010 on the set of new film 'Arthur' New York City, USA

Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman

Luis Guzman Saturday 17th July 2010 on the set of the new film 'Arthur' New York City, USA

Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman

Luis Guzman Friday 9th July 2010 on the set of the new film 'Arthur' New York City, USA

Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman

Luis Guzman and Liz Gardner - Luis guzman and Liz Gardner held at school of visual arts theatre New York City, USA - New York international latino film festival screening of 'the line' Saturday 1st August 2009

Luis Guzman and Liz Gardner
Luis Guzman

Luis Guzman Sunday 18th January 2009 2009 Latino Inaugural Gala at Union Station - Arrivals Washington DC, USA

Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman

Luis Guzman Sunday 18th January 2009 2009 Latino Inaugural Gala 'Celebrando El Cambio' at Union Station - Inside Washington DC, USA

Luis Guzman

Luis Guzman Wednesday 3rd December 2008 'Nothing Like The Holidays' Los Angeles Premiere - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman

Beverly Hills Chihuahua Review


Weak
Of all the misguided movie genres, the modern family film is the most disingenuous. While it argues that it's merely providing "quality" entertainment to those underserved by Hollywood's obsession with sex and violence, the truth is that most G- to PG-rated fare is far more insidious. Applying a sugar-coated Saturday morning superficiality to what's supposed to pass for pleasantries, the Tinsel Town machine still finds a way to manufacture out all the fun. Disney's disappointing live action comedy Beverly Hills Chihuahua can be accused of a great many faults -- indirect racism, single digit IQ writing, past-tense pop culture awareness -- but one thing it cannot claim is an ability to reach beyond its typical tween demographic.

Chloe (the voice of Drew Barrymore) is the most pampered pooch in all of sunny LaLa Land. Her owner (Jamie Lee Curtis) is a rich cosmetics titan who indulges her pet's every non-human whim. When the mogul needs to fly off to Europe to launch her new line, she must rely on her prissy, high strung niece Rachel (Piper Perabo) to mind her valuable canine. Showing just how responsible she is, our substitute sitter instantly accepts an invitation to weekend in Mexico, and takes Chloe along for the unnecessary ride. Dognappers eventually hijack the hound, and it's up to an ex-cop German Shepherd (voiced by Andy Garcia), a good natured landscaper (Manolo Cardona), and his frisky Chihuahua Papi (voiced by George Lopez) to rescue the four footed female before it's too late.

Continue reading: Beverly Hills Chihuahua Review

Nothing Like The Holidays Trailer


Watch the trailer for Nothing Like The Holidays.

Continue: Nothing Like The Holidays Trailer

Luis Guzman Wednesday 23rd July 2008 9th Annual New York International Latino Film Festival - Talent of the Barrio (Talento de Barrio) - After Party New York, USA

Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman

Luis Guzman - Monday 10th December 2007 at Ziegfeld Theatre New York City, USA

Luis Guzman

War Review


OK
The problem with being a connoisseur of B-grade action movies is that eventually you start applying the kind of elevated expectations that this genre is supposed to guard against. You get so accustomed to, say, a late-summer Jason Statham movie providing more thrills than many of its big-budget counterparts that suddenly Statham and Jet Li costarring in a chintzy action picture becomes a victim of perhaps unreasonable expectations.

That pairing of B-movie titans, somewhat inexplicably titled War, is neither a team-up nor a battle royale; it's actually kind of like a low-budget Heat knockoff, with a far larger cast and a far snakier plot than is warranted by the stars' specific and unpretentious skill sets. It begins with FBI agent Jack Crawford (Statham) losing his partner (Terry Chen) to a mysterious assassin called Rogue; so far, so cheesy, so good. But when Rogue (Jet Li) re-appears three years later, involved in a convoluted (or maybe just dull) bit of Asian-mob rivalry between the Yakuza and Triad families, momentum falters. Crawford attempts to navigate the underworld and bring his nemesis to justice, while geeks in the audience become confused by Rogue's inability to absorb Jason Statham's mutant fighting powers.

Continue reading: War Review

Franc Reyes and Luis Guzmán - Franc Reyes, Luis Guzmán New York City, USA - World Premiere of 'Illegal Tender' at Chelsea West Cinema Monday 20th August 2007

Rick Gonzalez and Franc Reyes

School For Scoundrels Review


Good
In School for Scoundrels, director Todd Phillips (Road Trip) proves that his truest virtue is also his greatest vice. Most comedies made in Hollywood today are stuffed to the gills with joke after joke after joke, with seemingly little regard for whether the humor actually works. In the bizarre logic of studio filmmaking, a lame joke is better than no joke at all. Phillips takes the opposite tack in his films. He's more concerned with the quality of laughs than with the quantity of them. His best effort, Old School, is a riotously funny movie with a surprisingly conservative sprinkling of jokes. It's a model of comic efficiency. Every bit works and every gag hit its target. However, there's a dark side to this approach. The slightest miscalculation in the quality of a joke can lead to long stretches without so much as a chuckle or even a smirk. And it's this problem that unfortunately afflicts School for Scoundrels.

Scoundrels gets off to a sluggish start as it introduces its main character, Roger (Jon Heder), a geeky New York City meter maid (meter butler?) whose life is falling apart. He gets robbed at work. His boss is unsympathetic to his problems and his coworkers ridicule him. He regularly humiliates himself in front of his gorgeous neighbor, Amanda (Jacinda Barrett). And even his volunteer work is a disaster, as his Little Brother asks to be assigned to someone else. Heder channels the inner nerd that carried Napoleon Dynamite to its stratospheric success, but the script doesn't provide enough originality or comic punch to bring his character to life. The opening 15 minutes are flat, dimensionless, and largely laugh-free.

Continue reading: School For Scoundrels Review

Dreamer: Inspired By A True Story Review


Good
Take Seabiscuit, remove the cussing, the drunkenness, the Depression, and all the death, and add in one prococious little blonde girl. You pretty much have Dreamer, a perfectly acceptable family film that, nonetheless, adds nothing to the genre.

Heck, if you throw in a zebra as well you have Racing Stripes, which came out a year earlier and told the same story: Girl adopts horse that no one believes in (in Dreamer it's a horse with a broken leg, not a zebra), who goes on to fame at the races. The film is based on a true story -- as the title probably clued you in -- about a horse named Mariah's Storm, a female who broke her leg and, after being completely written off, eventually returned to the track and earned hundreds of thousands of dollars. It's pretty much the same story here, though the horse is named Sonador (Spanish for "dreamer," if you add in a tilde), and genre-appropriate villains are written in to the tale.

Continue reading: Dreamer: Inspired By A True Story Review

The Count Of Monte Cristo (2002) Review


Very Good
The classic Monte Cristo sandwich is a rich confection -- almost inedibly so -- composed of layered ham, turkey, swiss cheese, mayonnaise, mustard, and crusty bread, all battered in egg and fried in hot grease. The diner is meant to dip this in jam before shoving it down his gullet.

The 2002 incarnation of The Count of Monte Cristo is a remarkably similar experience, full of pleasing flavors yet probably too rich for everyday consumption -- but, as with all things, I figure you'll eat it if you're hungry enough. Sure enough, in this snail-slow winter movie season, Monte Cristo is just about the best thing going. Like the sandwich, this isn't gourmet fare -- it's a crowd pleaser meant to entertain for a few brief moments, nothing more.

Continue reading: The Count Of Monte Cristo (2002) Review

One Tough Cop Review


Weak
One Tough Cop sure makes for one boring movie. This true story of a case in the life of NYC flatfoot Bo Dietl has that "ripped from today's headlines" feeling usually reserved for TV. It's best left there.

Carlito's Way Review


Extraordinary
Spitting in the face of the idea that criminals are simply nurtured by their environments, legendary gangster Carlito Brigante (Al Pacino, doing a vague approximation of a Puerto Rican accent) stands before a judge in the 1993 Brian De Palma film Carlito's Way and refuses to blame his criminal ways on his upbringing or the fact that his mother died when he was young: "The fact is, your honor, I was a mean little bastard when she was alive."

It's a rebuke to the environment-nurtures-criminals mentality that infused the previous De Palma/Pacino collaboration from 10 years earlier, Scarface, which stands as the bloody and exciting but frankly pretty immature younger brother to the more stately and ultimately more affecting Carlito's Way. The differences are obvious right from the film's opening gunshot: Carlito's been popped and is being wheeled away to the hospital, musing as he dies, "Don't take me to no hospital... Some bitch always pops you at midnight when all they got is a Chinese intern with a wooden spoon." The rest of the film is in flashback, starting with Carlito being let out of jail after serving only five years of a 30-year-sentence and leading back up to that gunshot.

Continue reading: Carlito's Way Review

Punch-Drunk Love Review


OK
Most wouldn't put Paul Thomas Anderson and the genre of romantic comedy in the same room and expect them to work together well. The director of Magnolia and Boogie Nights tends to shy from the formulaic filmmaking inherent in warming the hearts of couples, and that's certainly not the purpose of Punch-Drunk Love. The problem is defining just exactly what that purpose is to begin with.

The estimable Emily Watson plays Lena Leonard, Barry Egan's (Adam Sandler) ultimate dream woman. In fact, she's everyone's vision of virtue in her ability to ignore or simply not care about whatever foolish stunt Barry pulls. Perhaps, as the heavy-laid music at one point suggests, the very attraction is that she is so normal while he is such a buffoon. Once you get over the idea that love at first sight with two eclectic characters would be cute, something has to provoke you to root for the cause, and whatever that could have been never happens.

Continue reading: Punch-Drunk Love Review

Sam The Man Review


Bad
Gary Winick's first -- and biggest -- gaffe is in casting uber-nerd Fisher "Johnny Five!" Stevens as a slick lothario that beds countless women. Christening him "The Man" in the film's title is just adding insult to injury.

And so we come to the strange, sad, and rather crass case of Sam the Man, a creepy and just plain wrong romantic dramedy that's got no romance, few laughs, minimal drama, and a parade of hateful characters. Wrap them up in a cheap, out-of-focus, underlit, and inaudible package shot on cheap digital video, and the recipe for disaster is complete. Microwave on high for three minutes.

Continue reading: Sam The Man Review

Q & A Review


Good
Sidney Lumet's sprawling cop/DA drama shows promise but ends up muddled and confused, the victim of a few too many subplots and side characters -- all of whom get killed. Nolte is hilariously bad and good at the same time as a corrupt cop, while Hutton is the earnest DA trying to bust him. Remarkably mediocre.

Continue reading: Q & A Review

Waiting Review


Weak
Those who have worked in food service know the challenges and difficulties the trade involves. They also know, as patrons, how to conduct themselves at a restaurant. More likely than not, they have observed a few incidences in which an employee at a restaurant -- quite possibly themselves -- has sought revenge on an especially difficult customer by tampering with the food in nasty, nauseating, stomach-churning ways, and they don't want something similar to happen to them.

I've never worked in food service myself. After watching Waiting, I thank my lucky stars for that. It does not appear to be an overly gratifying profession. Strenuous hours. Difficult bosses. Whining customers. Demanding environment. I have, however, been a difficult customer in the past. Waiting has woken me up to the reality of my nature, and the possible consequences I could receive. It goes without saying that my days as an obstinate customer are over.

Continue reading: Waiting Review

Table One Review


Bad
Bad idea: Make a comedy with nothing but loser guys and no real female parts. Lots of people are gonna line up for that one (Jackass excepted).

The wafer-thin story here, about the misadventures of a group of guys who somewhat foolishly invested in a bar/restaurant and hang out there every night in the hopes of impressing the ladies. Needless to say, they impress no one and end up the same losers 90 minutes later.

Continue reading: Table One Review

Traffic Review


Essential
How do you fight a war when the people that you love are the enemy? When the conflict is in your own neighborhood, or your own house? Such is the dilemma in the exceptional new film about the drug trade in the United States and Mexico, Traffic.

A harrowing and thought-provoking film, Traffic revolves around three intertwining stories of cops, thugs, victims, enforcers, politicians, and the judicial system. The film is based on a British Channel 4 miniseries called Traffik, which traced a drug route from Pakistan through Europe and to Great Britain. Laura Bickford, one of the producers for Traffic, was attracted to the original miniseries because of the intersecting stories, the social commentary on drug usage, and the implication of The System itself being the major perpetrator of drug addiction.

Continue reading: Traffic Review

Double Whammy Review


Weak
Has any film director fallen quite as far as Tom DiCillo? After a masterful debut with his tongue-in-cheek look at filmmaking, Living in Oblivion, DiCillo has turned in a series of progressively more-ignored features, including Box of Moon Light and The Real Blonde. His latest, Double Whammy, is going straight to video, despite a cast that includes Denis Leary and Elizabeth Hurley -- and not in bit parts, either!

The silly, one-joke story is reason enough to find Whammy (not a movie about Press Your Luck!) so inspiring. Leary plays a cop who, only through some fault of his own, is never able to bust a perp. It starts out in a fast food joint, when a gunman drives through the wall and starts shooting. Leary slips and hits his head, and a little bespectacled kid uses his gun to save the day. Later, his apartment supervisor is killed while he's oblivious in the building. Various quirky characters (like Hurley's masseuse) try to distract you into thinking this movie is actually about something, but the deception never works too well.

Continue reading: Double Whammy Review

The Salton Sea Review


Excellent
The imagery of The Salton Sea surpasses standard noir. It's a tale of a desolate man lost in an abyss of emotional turmoil, desperately seeking redemption and revenge against unknown assailants. The film's opening shot of Val Kilmer, sitting on a barren floor surrounded by flames as he pours Miles Davis through his trumpet, delivers both the physical heat of the flames and the fiery, emotional pain of loss locked within his eyes. It's a haunting and eerily tragic moment of humanity displayed at its weakest point of existence.

The story of The Salton Sea is constructed as an updated version of a 1940s noir film. Expertly written by Tony Gayton, the film opens up with a brief history of speed, a crash course complete with 1950s housewives and Japanese kamikaze pilots. Then, the camera quickly navigates through a crazed house party and lands next to a heavily tattooed Kilmer, sitting amongst speed freaks on a four-day binge. Or maybe it's been three days. With a strong voiceover delivered by Kilmer, we learn about the double life he leads. One life is an addict and police informant known as Danny Parker, complete with numerous tats, leather pants, and skull rings on every finger. And another one, locked in his closet, is a trumpeter named Tom Van Allen, whose wife ended up dead years ago at the hands of masked men during a rest stop robbery while vacationing at the Salton Sea.

Continue reading: The Salton Sea Review

Snake Eyes Review


OK
It's not as bad as you've heard, but this De Palma/Cage thriller set entirely at a thrown boxing match in an Atlantic City casino blows multiple opportunities to have a lot of fun within its high-tech environs. Mediocre, but watchable.

The Count Of Monte Cristo Review


Very Good
The classic Monte Cristo sandwich is a rich confection -- almost inedibly so -- composed of layered ham, turkey, swiss cheese, mayonnaise, mustard, and crusty bread, all battered in egg and fried in hot grease. The diner is meant to dip this in jam before shoving it down his gullet.

The 2002 incarnation of The Count of Monte Cristo is a remarkably similar experience, full of pleasing flavors yet probably too rich for everyday consumption -- but, as with all things, I figure you'll eat it if you're hungry enough. Sure enough, in this snail-slow winter movie season, Monte Cristo is just about the best thing going. Like the sandwich, this isn't gourmet fare -- it's a crowd pleaser meant to entertain for a few brief moments, nothing more.

Continue reading: The Count Of Monte Cristo Review

Dumb And Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd Review


Terrible
Dumb and Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd is without doubt the worst movie I've seen in a long time! It hardly warrants the pity star I have to give it because we don't give anything lower! In fact, this movie is so bad that I should, in retrospect, give a half star bump-up to all of the previous films that I've given one star to because they just don't belong in the same company as this film.

Dumberer is the prequel to the hugely successful comedy Dumb and Dumber, starring Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels as two social misfits on a road trip looking for love in their canine car. This time around, we see just how the pair met, and became friends. After being home schooled for years, Harry (Eric Christian Olsen) and Lloyd (Derek Richardson) are finally ready for public high school (either that or their parents got sick of their childishness). As fate would have it, on their first day of school, Harry and Lloyd literally run into each other. Attracted to the other one's stupidity, they not only become inseparable, they also become the first students of the school's new special needs class.

Continue reading: Dumb And Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd Review

The Limey Review


Very Good

Director Steven Soderbergh's "The Limey" is everything the recent Mel Gibson vehicle "Payback" wished it could be.

I liked "Payback," but it was an amusement park ride without depth or feeling -- just a guy with a short temper and a gun with an endless magazine clip.

"The Limey" -- like "Payback" -- is violent, primal, revenge fantasy, set against the perfidious underworld of the Los Angeles music industry. But unlike "Payback," it is not an action flick with a dark candy center. It's far more cunning, poetic and abstract. It is to gritty crime flicks what "Unforgiven" is to Westerns.

Continue reading: The Limey Review

Lost & Found Review


Weak

A little perspective before I dive into my review of "Lostand Found": You should know I had been dreading this movie for weeks.I fully expected I would have to restrain myself from walking out in themiddle. I mean, David Spade, that grating, diminutive, sarcastic littleditch rat in dire need of a hair cut from "Saturday Night Live"in a romantic comedy? David Spade getting cozy with the lithe and lovelyFrench actress Sophie Marceau? Oh, puh-leaze!

Having said that, there have been a lot of "SNL"alumni vehicles far worse than this one, which is often funny and occasionallyborders on actual charm.

Giving hope to 98 lb. dorks everywhere, Spade essentiallyplays himself as a struggling restaurateur, who is so smitten with hissupple new neighbor (Marceau) that he kidnaps her ever-errant pooch sohe can play hero by helping her search for the missing mutt and score someface time with the girl.

Continue reading: Lost & Found Review

Lemony Snicket's A Series Of Unfortunate Events Review


Weak

(Proofread pending)

Jim Carrey makes a four-course meal of the Tim-Burtonesque surreal scenery in "Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events," completely overshadowing the story that is supposed to be about three crafty young orphans stuck in a cycle of lethal luck with a string of eccentric guardians.

As the inheritance-coveting Count Olaf, who is first to mind them (and virtually enslave them) after their parents die in a mysterious mansion fire, Carrey camps and vamps, huffs and puffs, cackles and clowns, sucking up all the air in the room and doing everything short of screaming "look at me, look at me!" Made up as a storybook villain, with a ski-jump nose, a theatrically receding hairline and a wardrobe that seems to mix Edwardian-inspired hand-me-downs from Elton John and Lenny Kravitz, his plan is to get rich by having the children fall victim to some terrible "accident" -- as when he leaves them locked in a car parked on the tracks at a train crossing in the countryside.

Continue reading: Lemony Snicket's A Series Of Unfortunate Events Review

Welcome To Collinwood Review


OK

The entire, very talented cast of the caper comedy "Welcome to Collinwood" is clearly having a good time playing criminal washouts who know more about their own local-crook jargon than they do about breaking and entering. But you get the feeling watching it that having a good time took precedence over making anything more than an insubstantial romp designed to entertain themselves.

Amusing but otherwise forgettable, the flick stars Luis Guzman (also in this week's "Punch-Drunk Love") as an imprisoned petty thief who hears about a supposed dream heist opportunity from a lifer he's serving time with and says to himself, "This could be my Belini!" But he needs a Melinski to take the fall and someone who can pull a Krasner at the Shylock's office they'll break into, so the job doesn't turn into a real kaputchnick.

But in the process of trying to line up a patsy, his girlfriend on the outside (Patricia Clarkson) ends up with half a dozen hapless partners instead -- including a hopelessly amateur boxer (Sam Rockwell), an unemployed photographer (William H. Macy) who carts his infant son everywhere he goes because his can't afford his wife's bail, a frail old thief (Michael Jeter) who can't complete a sentence without pausing for breath, a dubiously "expert" safe-cracker in a wheelchair (George Clooney) who is a little cracked himself, and a couple more small-time hustlers (Isaiah Washington and Andrew Davoli).With stars such as these employing the cheeky comic instincts they've honed, often together, in flicks by David Mamet and/or Steven Soderbergh (who produced this picture with Clooney), the frivolity is contagious, even if the plot and the gags are, more often than not, obvious, broad and overused.

Continue reading: Welcome To Collinwood Review

The Salton Sea Review


OK

A handsomely stylish, semi-punk, drug-culture updating of the wronged-man's-revenge film noir plot, "The Salton Sea" has one of the most enticingly, quintessentially film noir opening scenes I've ever seen.

Picture this: Val Kilmer, dressed as a hep cat who just finished a gig at a downtown jazz club, sits on the floor of his burning apartment. Leaning on a wall, silhouetted against the orange flames, he's playing his trumpet and bleeding -- possibly to death -- from a gunshot wound. A bag full of money lies beside him with wads of bills spilling out onto the floor beside him.

"My name is Tom Van Allen. Or Danny Parker. I honestly don't know any more," he breathes in a honeyed, genre-perfect voice-over. "You can decide -- yeah, maybe you can help me, friend. You can help me decide who I am. Avenging Angel? Judas Iscariot? Loving husband? Trumpet player? Speed freak?"

Continue reading: The Salton Sea Review

Anger Management Review


Unbearable

Writer David Dorfman, director Peter Segal and star Adam Sandler missed a golden opportunity in "Anger Management," a comedy bereft of laughs about a milquetoast office drone and designer of fat feline fashions (?) who is sentenced to rage therapy after an incident on an airline.

The incident: His repeated polite requests for a headset to watch the in-flight movie are absurdly mistaken for aggression by a flight crew with post-9/11 jitters. The missed opportunity: The concept's punchline should have been that he really is a rage-a-holic and the calm version of events we see is his skewed perspective of normalcy.

Instead, the picture sticks with the notions that typically dim-bulb Sandler (insert empty-eyed double-take head-cocks here) really is a misunderstood nice guy, and the actor fails to find a single genuine laugh in the story's goofball gimmick -- which is that his nutzo court-appointed therapist (Jack Nicholson, volume turned up to 11) moves in with him and makes his life a living hell.

Continue reading: Anger Management Review

Punch-Drunk Love Review


Good

Dingbat love has never been as oddly appealing as in "Punch-Drunk Love," a surrealistically fluffy romance from the traditionally somber Paul Thomas Anderson ("Boogie Nights," "Magnolia").

Affably, obligingly abstract from the curiously inspired casting of Adam Sandler as a meek, sad, eccentric romantic hero to the peculiar plot about sex chat-line extortion and pudding-procured frequent flyer miles, it's a charming, strange little movie that strikes at the heart while the head is still trying to figure it out.

The story begins about 6 in the morning, with early-to-rise goofball entrepreneur Barry Egan (Sandler) sitting at a plain desk in the empty corner of the warehouse where his startup company makes novelty toilet plungers (wedding cake figurines perched atop the handle, dice and dollar bills in transparent handles for Vegas hotels, etc.). Compelled to take a walk outside with his ever-present cup of coffee, he witnesses a traffic accident on the near-empty street, while at the same time a minivan pulls up in front of him and dumps a harmonium (like a miniature console piano with accordion bellows under the keyboard) on the curb for no discernable reason. Such is the irrationally whimsical world of a P.T. Anderson picture.

Continue reading: Punch-Drunk Love Review

Runaway Jury Review


OK

There are enough holes in the legal minutia of "Runaway Jury" to keep anyone with a law degree laughing from beginning to end. But for the rest of us, this fast-paced thriller's twist-crescendo-ing plot and sharp performances should at least delay the feeling of being duped until after the credits roll.

Another popcorny courtroom concoction from a John Grisham novel, the movie is a sensationalized peek into jury tampering during a big-money wrongful-death suit filed against an assault-weapon manufacturer after a workplace shooting.

The film wears its politics on its sleeve: the rich, cigar-smoking, unrepentant gun industry honchos have hired an unscrupulous jury consultant (deliciously iniquitous Gene Hackman) with the high-tech means to dig up dirt and create graphic-intensive computer-screen portfolios on everybody who received a jury summons for the case.

Continue reading: Runaway Jury Review

Dumb & Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd Review


Unbearable

"Dumb and Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd" couldn't be dumberer if Harry and Lloyd had written the script themselves.

A cash-in prequel to 1994's guilty-pleasure gross-out comedy starring Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels as two low-IQ nincompoops on a cross-country trip, this movie is an obtuse, half-assed, meandering, slapped-together, pointless and nearly plotless journey back to the high school days of the same two dolts.

Twenty-something actors Derek Richardson (aping Daniels' blank stare and frazzled Einstein hair) and Eric Christian Olsen (doing a sporadically passable Carrey impression, with the character's bowl haircut and chipped tooth) don't have much to work with as Harry and Lloyd. Having been co-written and absentee-directed by Troy Miller ("Jack Frost"), "Dumberer" has no hint of the low-brow wit of the first movie -- which was the debut of the writing-directing Farrelly Brothers ("There's Something About Mary").

Continue reading: Dumb & Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd Review

The Bone Collector Review


OK

It's time to hold a wake for the tired clichés of the serial killer thriller. In fact, it's time Hollywood put the whole genre to bed.

I say, from now on, unless a director can promise to at least give "Seven" or "Silence of the Lambs" a run for their money, no more of these pictures should be green-lighted.

These movies, in which gifted cops track the grisly murder sprees of guiltless psychotics through gritty urban landscapes, have become as standardized as their low-brow cousin, the slasher flick.

Continue reading: The Bone Collector Review

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In The Blood Trailer

In The Blood Trailer

Ava is skilled at fighting and has left behind a rather shady past to set...

Turbo Movie Review

Turbo Movie Review

Whizzy and superficial, this isn't the most complicated animated film ever made, but it's a...

Turbo Trailer

Turbo Trailer

Turbo has big dreams for such a small garden snail; dreams that stretch beyond his...

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Turbo Trailer

Turbo Trailer

Turbo might be just your average garden snail but there's one thing that sets him...

Turbo Trailer

Turbo Trailer

Turbo is a regular garden snail who, unlike his friends, is bored of living his...

The Last Stand Movie Review

The Last Stand Movie Review

Korean filmmaker Kim played with the Western genre before in his wacky 2008 pastiche The...

Turbo Trailer

Turbo Trailer

Turbo is a garden snail with big dreams of becoming the speediest snail in the...

The Last Stand Trailer

The Last Stand Trailer

Ray Owens is a police sheriff whose major crime fighting days are all but over...

Journey 2: The Mysterious Island Movie Review

Journey 2: The Mysterious Island Movie Review

With just one character from the 2008 adventure, this film does a decent job continuing...

Journey 2: The Mysterious Island Trailer

Journey 2: The Mysterious Island Trailer

Sean Anderson has moved back in with his mother, after embarking on the adventure of...

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