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Cast of ''Code Black" Benjamin Hollington, Luis Guzman, Bonnie Somerville, William Allen Young, Marica Gay Harden, Melanie Kannokade, Raza Jaffrey and Harry M.Ford - A hosts of celebrities turned out in their numbers and were snapped as they arrived for the 2015 CBS Upfront which was held at The Tent at the Lincoln Center in New York City, New York, United States - Wednesday 13th May 2015

Cast Of ''code Black
Luis Guzman and Bonnie Somerville

Luis Guzman - The Players' Tribune Launch Party - Arrivals - Manhattan, New York, United States - Saturday 14th February 2015

Luis Guzman

Luis Guzmán - Stars were snapped as they took to the red carpet at the Screening of action, crime thriller 'The Equalizer' in New York City, New York, United States - Monday 22nd September 2014

Luis Guzmán
Luis Guzmán

Luis Guzman - World Premiere of 'We're The Millers' at the Ziegfeld Theater - New York, NY, United States - Thursday 1st August 2013

Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman

Video - Michelle Rodriguez And Ken Jeong Were Stars On The Red Carpet At The 'Turbo' NY Premiere - Part 3


Some of the stars from the animated snail film 'Turbo' were seen on the red carpet at the movie's premiere in New York City at AMC Loews Lincoln Square. 'Fast & Furious' star Michelle Rodriguez was among them, in a stunning black cut-out gown.

Continue: Video - Michelle Rodriguez And Ken Jeong Were Stars On The Red Carpet At The 'Turbo' NY Premiere - Part 3

Luis Guzman - New York premiere of 'Turbo' shown at AMC Loews Lincoln Square - New York, NY, United States - Tuesday 9th July 2013

Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman

Guest and Luis Guzman - The World Premiere of 'The Last Stand' shown at Grauman's Chinese Theatre Hollywood California United States Monday 14th January 2013

Guest and Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman and Grauman's Chinese Theatre
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Guest and Luis Guzman
Guest, Luis Guzman and Harvey Guillen

Luis Guzman, In and Blood - Luis Guzman on the set of 'In the Blood' Saturday 1st December 2012 Featuring: Luis Guzman Where: Santurce, Puerto Rico

Luis Guzman, In and Blood
Luis Guzman, In and Blood
Luis Guzman, In and Blood
Luis Guzman, In and Blood
Luis Guzman, In and Blood
Luis Guzman, In and Blood

Guest and Luis Guzman Tuesday 11th September 2012 New York Premiere of The Master at the Zigfield Theater

Guest and Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman

Luis Guzman - Actor Luis Guzman Tuesday 17th April 2012 seen at Fred Segal with a female companion

Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
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Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman

Luis Guzman and Grauman's Chinese Theatre Thursday 2nd February 2012 The Los Angeles Premiere of 'Journey 2: The Mysterious Island' held at The Grauman's Chinese Theatre - Arrivals

Journey 2: The Mysterious Island Trailer


Sean Anderson has moved back in with his mother, after embarking on the adventure of a lifetime with his uncle, in which they discovered a lost world at the centre of the earth. Now, his mum has a new boyfriend, called Hank.

After Sean's grandfather goes missing, Sean tries to track him down but to no avail. The teen suspects that his grandfather is on the hunt again for a mysterious island and a few days later, his suspicions are confirmed when he gets a strange fax that repeats the same words over and over, as well as strange radio signals. Wishing to uncover the truth Sean shares these findings with his uncle who dismisses them as the work of a lunatic but Sean is adamant that it is his grandfather, who has finally found the island after years of searching.

Sean decides to go after his grandfather and persuades Hank to join him, which he does with great reluctance. After looking up the coordinates of the island, they travel to a nearby port, where they persuade a local man and his pretty daughter to fly them to the island. Despite their protests that there is no island, they agree to help Sean and Hank.

Tragedy soon strikes when Sean, Hank and the pretty girl Kailani are stuck on the mysterious island, which is filled with all sorts of exotic and dangerous animals. And there appears to be no way off...

Journey 2: The Mysterious Island is the sequel to the 2008 film, Journey To The Center Of The Earth, which starred Brendan Fraser and Josh Hutcherson, who reprises his role in this film.

Starring: Dwayne Johnson, Josh Hutcherson, Vanessa Hudgens, Luis Guzman, Michael Caine, Kristin Davis and Michael Beasley

The Caller Trailer


Mary is a recent divorcee, having broken things off with her abusive husband, Steven. She moves out of their once shared home and into an apartment. However, Steven doesn't want to get over Mary and so bombards her with a deluge of calls, so much so that she puts out a restraining order on him.

Continue: The Caller Trailer

Luis Guzman - Temi Guzman and Luis Guzman New York City, USA - The Olevolos Project Fundraiser Brunch at La Cirque - Arrivals Saturday 21st May 2011

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Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman

Arthur Review


OK
In a sea of unnecessary remakes, this rehash of the 1981 comedy seems particularly ill-timed, as it's no longer fun to laugh at irresponsible drunks, especially when they're billionaires. But it's just about watchable.

Pampered rich boy-man Arthur Bach (Brand) has finally pushed his mother (James) too far. Head of a multinational conglomerate, she tells him he'll lose his inheritance if he doesn't marry the shark-like Susan (Garner), daughter of a property tycoon (Nolte). In a perpetual state of womanising drunkenness, Arthur is propped up by the only two people who like him: long-suffering nanny Hobson (Mirren) and patient chauffer Bitterman (Guzman). Then as he agrees to marry Susan, he finds himself falling for quirky tour guide Naomi (Gerwig).

Continue reading: Arthur Review

Luis Guzman, Greta Gerwig, Helen Mirren, Jennifer Garner and Russell Brand - Luis Guzman, Greta Gerwig, Russell Brand, Helen Mirren and Jennifer Garner Tuesday 5th April 2011 at Ziegfeld Theatre New York City, USA

Luis Guzman, Greta Gerwig, Helen Mirren, Jennifer Garner and Russell Brand
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
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Luis Guzman

Arthur Trailer


Arthur Bach is a man who's always had everything he wants, from driving around in the Batmobile to his floating bed and music lessons with Kanye West whatever Arthur wants he gets. Many would say, Arthur is a child stuck in a man's body and he would be if it were not for his faithful lifelong carer, Hobson, who's his best friend and perhaps the only one who truly believes in Arthur's potential. There's also Bitterman, Arthur's driver who is his general partner in crime when it comes to getting up to things a billionaire shouldn't be seen doing.

Continue: Arthur Trailer

Helen Mirren and Luis Guzman - Helen Mirren and Luis Guzman New York City, USA - on the set of the new film 'Arthur' Tuesday 3rd August 2010

Helen Mirren and Luis Guzman
Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
Russell Brand and Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren and Luis Guzman
Russell Brand and Helen Mirren

Luis Guzman and Brooke Shields - Luis Guzman and Brooke Shields Monday 2nd August 2010 New York Premiere of 'The Other Guys' held at Ziegfeld Theater

Luis Guzman and Brooke Shields
Luis Guzman and Brooke Shields

Luis Guzman Monday 2nd August 2010 on the set of new film 'Arthur' New York City, USA

Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman

Old Dogs Trailer


Watch the trailer for Old Dogs

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The Taking Of Pelham 1 2 3 Review


Good
Adapting a steely 1970s hit into a glossy 21st century blockbuster, Tony Scott indulges in his usual flashy pyrotechnics, which almost cover up the gaping craters in the plot. He also encourages his cast to really go for it.

Walter (Washington) is working at the dispatch desk for the New York Subway when crazed gunman Ryder (Travolta) hijacks the Pelham 123 and demands a huge ransom, or else he'll start killing passengers. Ryder refuses to talk to the know-it-all terrorism expert (Turturro), so Walter is pressed into service as a negotiator while the mayor (Gandolfini) gets the cash together. But Ryder and his goons are serious about this and, as the body count grows, the clock is ticking.

Director Scott and writer Helgeland aren't known for their subtlety, and this film is all whizzy style that's more about pure entertainment rather than establishing any actual suspense or character tension. The whole film is a collection of crashing edits, freeze frames, countdown graphics, loud sound effects and cheesily hysterical dialog. In other words, it's great fun. And it gives the cast plenty of scenery to chomp on--especially Travolta, who shows no mercy as he snarls and spits out every line.

Since this is a film about a Subway carriage sitting still in a tunnel, Scott keeps the camera moving at all times. He also manages to throw in a crazed car chase and loads of big crashes for no real reason, as well as orchestrating a painfully contrived reason to get Washington in on the gun-waving action. Not to throwing in several rather overwrought back-stories. By the end, the film has turned into a full-on Die Hard movie, complete with over-the-top violence and some real brutality.

Amid the fabulously enjoyable actors, it's Gandolfini who walks off with the movie using sardonic understatement. The whole film is pretty hilarious, although this clearly wasn't the intention. Scott zooms past plot holes like a runaway train; we barely have time to say "Huh?" before the next bit of action mayhem assaults all our senses. There's not a moment of actual suspense, but it's so big and outrageous that we can't help but hold on for the ride.

Continue reading: The Taking Of Pelham 1 2 3 Review

The Taking Of Pelham 1 2 3 (2009) Review


Good
Excellent acting can save almost anything. Even the most mediocre script or hamfisted direction can usually be manipulated and salvaged by a couple of pros performing at their thespian peak. It doesn't always work -- the actors can and often do make their obvious attempts known, stealing so much of the limelight that the project can't help but implode. But for something like The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3, a routine remake of a '70s pulp novel/post-modern thriller, star power is the all-important ingredient. The work of Denzel Washington and John Travolta elevates material that otherwise sits flatly on the screen. No matter how hard director Tony Scott and screenwriter Brian Helgeland try, the hijack/hostage material here plays as dated, and in some instances, dull.

For recently demoted NYC Transit Authority official Walter Garber (Washington), working the dispatcher's desk is just the latest in a rash of embarrassments. Under investigation for taking bribes, the longtime civil servant is resolved to do his job and not make waves. Naturally, all that changes when the subway out of Pelham City station is hijacked by four gun-toting criminals. Led by the mysterious "Mr. Ryder" (Travolta), their demands are simple -- $10 million in one hour. If the delivery is late, they will kill one hostage for every minute over 60 they have to wait. Initially, the Mayor (James Gandolfini) is convinced that the NYPD, under the direction of hostage negotiator Camonetti (John Turturro) will get the situation under control. But Ryder will only deal with Garber, and when he makes his deadly intentions known, the former front office man must save the day.

Continue reading: The Taking Of Pelham 1 2 3 (2009) Review

Fighting Review


Good
There is something abnormally aggressive and conversational being deployed in the street-fight drama Fighting. It's the second film directed and co-written by New York native Dito Montiel and, like his nostalgic debut A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints, it has a great love for NYC location shooting.

This film tells a very familiar tale of a talented fighter discovered by an opportunistic but ultimately good-hearted manager/trainer and shoved into a world of money, greed, and empty glory that he may not be prepared for. But Never Back Down, this is not. The moment Shawn (Channing Tatum) enters the screen, it's obvious he is not wise nor even very intelligent for that matter. He's lean and muscular but he doesn't have it over on anyone, and this is partially how he comes under the wing of Harvey Boarden (Terrence Howard), a street hustler who has connections to the world of private boxing. There's a hint of imperialism in the way the very white Shawn squares-off against four fighters, beginning with a brawny Eastern European type and ending with Evan (Brian J. White), a black, brutal fighter who Shawn's father taught and loved more than his son.

Continue reading: Fighting Review

Nothing Like The Holidays Review


OK
Caucasians have not cornered the market on festive dysfunction. It may seem like every Christmas family in freefall is as white as the snow that symbolizes the season, but that's not true. All ethnicities have their yuletide horror stories, and it looks like Tinseltown is finally working its way out of the WASP-ish wilds of the suburbs. Last year, This Christmas focused on an African-American clan's tell-all Noel. In 2008, it's the Hispanics' turn to celebrate. Nothing Like the Holidays uses Chicago's Humboldt Park as the backdrop for a great deal of warmth, a little comic craziness, and a whole lot of biology-based nerve fraying. The result is something decent, if not delightful.

For the Rodriguez family, this Christmas is more trying than others. Father Edy (Alfred Molina) is still trying to talk his way out of the doghouse with wife Anna (Elizabeth Peña). She's angry over a past infidelity and is hinting at a divorce. He's angry that their Iraq War veteran son Jesse (Freddy Rodriguez) doesn't want to take over the family business. Wannabe-actress daughter Roxanna (Vanessa Ferlito) is anxious over the possibility of landing a prime role in a television series, while ignoring the local boy Ozzy (Jay Hernandez) who clearly pines away for her. But the couple's biggest concern is Mauricio (John Leguizamo) and his non-Puerto Rican wife Sarah (Debra Messing). Their marriage has yet to produce grandchildren, and for Edy and Anna, family is everything.

Continue reading: Nothing Like The Holidays Review

Beverly Hills Chihuahua Review


Weak
Of all the misguided movie genres, the modern family film is the most disingenuous. While it argues that it's merely providing "quality" entertainment to those underserved by Hollywood's obsession with sex and violence, the truth is that most G- to PG-rated fare is far more insidious. Applying a sugar-coated Saturday morning superficiality to what's supposed to pass for pleasantries, the Tinsel Town machine still finds a way to manufacture out all the fun. Disney's disappointing live action comedy Beverly Hills Chihuahua can be accused of a great many faults -- indirect racism, single digit IQ writing, past-tense pop culture awareness -- but one thing it cannot claim is an ability to reach beyond its typical tween demographic.

Chloe (the voice of Drew Barrymore) is the most pampered pooch in all of sunny LaLa Land. Her owner (Jamie Lee Curtis) is a rich cosmetics titan who indulges her pet's every non-human whim. When the mogul needs to fly off to Europe to launch her new line, she must rely on her prissy, high strung niece Rachel (Piper Perabo) to mind her valuable canine. Showing just how responsible she is, our substitute sitter instantly accepts an invitation to weekend in Mexico, and takes Chloe along for the unnecessary ride. Dognappers eventually hijack the hound, and it's up to an ex-cop German Shepherd (voiced by Andy Garcia), a good natured landscaper (Manolo Cardona), and his frisky Chihuahua Papi (voiced by George Lopez) to rescue the four footed female before it's too late.

Continue reading: Beverly Hills Chihuahua Review

Nothing Like The Holidays Trailer


Watch the trailer for Nothing Like The Holidays.

Continue: Nothing Like The Holidays Trailer

War Review


OK
The problem with being a connoisseur of B-grade action movies is that eventually you start applying the kind of elevated expectations that this genre is supposed to guard against. You get so accustomed to, say, a late-summer Jason Statham movie providing more thrills than many of its big-budget counterparts that suddenly Statham and Jet Li costarring in a chintzy action picture becomes a victim of perhaps unreasonable expectations.

That pairing of B-movie titans, somewhat inexplicably titled War, is neither a team-up nor a battle royale; it's actually kind of like a low-budget Heat knockoff, with a far larger cast and a far snakier plot than is warranted by the stars' specific and unpretentious skill sets. It begins with FBI agent Jack Crawford (Statham) losing his partner (Terry Chen) to a mysterious assassin called Rogue; so far, so cheesy, so good. But when Rogue (Jet Li) re-appears three years later, involved in a convoluted (or maybe just dull) bit of Asian-mob rivalry between the Yakuza and Triad families, momentum falters. Crawford attempts to navigate the underworld and bring his nemesis to justice, while geeks in the audience become confused by Rogue's inability to absorb Jason Statham's mutant fighting powers.

Continue reading: War Review

School For Scoundrels Review


Good
In School for Scoundrels, director Todd Phillips (Road Trip) proves that his truest virtue is also his greatest vice. Most comedies made in Hollywood today are stuffed to the gills with joke after joke after joke, with seemingly little regard for whether the humor actually works. In the bizarre logic of studio filmmaking, a lame joke is better than no joke at all. Phillips takes the opposite tack in his films. He's more concerned with the quality of laughs than with the quantity of them. His best effort, Old School, is a riotously funny movie with a surprisingly conservative sprinkling of jokes. It's a model of comic efficiency. Every bit works and every gag hit its target. However, there's a dark side to this approach. The slightest miscalculation in the quality of a joke can lead to long stretches without so much as a chuckle or even a smirk. And it's this problem that unfortunately afflicts School for Scoundrels.

Scoundrels gets off to a sluggish start as it introduces its main character, Roger (Jon Heder), a geeky New York City meter maid (meter butler?) whose life is falling apart. He gets robbed at work. His boss is unsympathetic to his problems and his coworkers ridicule him. He regularly humiliates himself in front of his gorgeous neighbor, Amanda (Jacinda Barrett). And even his volunteer work is a disaster, as his Little Brother asks to be assigned to someone else. Heder channels the inner nerd that carried Napoleon Dynamite to its stratospheric success, but the script doesn't provide enough originality or comic punch to bring his character to life. The opening 15 minutes are flat, dimensionless, and largely laugh-free.

Continue reading: School For Scoundrels Review

Dreamer: Inspired By A True Story Review


Good
Take Seabiscuit, remove the cussing, the drunkenness, the Depression, and all the death, and add in one prococious little blonde girl. You pretty much have Dreamer, a perfectly acceptable family film that, nonetheless, adds nothing to the genre.

Heck, if you throw in a zebra as well you have Racing Stripes, which came out a year earlier and told the same story: Girl adopts horse that no one believes in (in Dreamer it's a horse with a broken leg, not a zebra), who goes on to fame at the races. The film is based on a true story -- as the title probably clued you in -- about a horse named Mariah's Storm, a female who broke her leg and, after being completely written off, eventually returned to the track and earned hundreds of thousands of dollars. It's pretty much the same story here, though the horse is named Sonador (Spanish for "dreamer," if you add in a tilde), and genre-appropriate villains are written in to the tale.

Continue reading: Dreamer: Inspired By A True Story Review

The Count Of Monte Cristo (2002) Review


Very Good
The classic Monte Cristo sandwich is a rich confection -- almost inedibly so -- composed of layered ham, turkey, swiss cheese, mayonnaise, mustard, and crusty bread, all battered in egg and fried in hot grease. The diner is meant to dip this in jam before shoving it down his gullet.

The 2002 incarnation of The Count of Monte Cristo is a remarkably similar experience, full of pleasing flavors yet probably too rich for everyday consumption -- but, as with all things, I figure you'll eat it if you're hungry enough. Sure enough, in this snail-slow winter movie season, Monte Cristo is just about the best thing going. Like the sandwich, this isn't gourmet fare -- it's a crowd pleaser meant to entertain for a few brief moments, nothing more.

Continue reading: The Count Of Monte Cristo (2002) Review

One Tough Cop Review


Weak
One Tough Cop sure makes for one boring movie. This true story of a case in the life of NYC flatfoot Bo Dietl has that "ripped from today's headlines" feeling usually reserved for TV. It's best left there.

Carlito's Way Review


Extraordinary
Spitting in the face of the idea that criminals are simply nurtured by their environments, legendary gangster Carlito Brigante (Al Pacino, doing a vague approximation of a Puerto Rican accent) stands before a judge in the 1993 Brian De Palma film Carlito's Way and refuses to blame his criminal ways on his upbringing or the fact that his mother died when he was young: "The fact is, your honor, I was a mean little bastard when she was alive."

It's a rebuke to the environment-nurtures-criminals mentality that infused the previous De Palma/Pacino collaboration from 10 years earlier, Scarface, which stands as the bloody and exciting but frankly pretty immature younger brother to the more stately and ultimately more affecting Carlito's Way. The differences are obvious right from the film's opening gunshot: Carlito's been popped and is being wheeled away to the hospital, musing as he dies, "Don't take me to no hospital... Some bitch always pops you at midnight when all they got is a Chinese intern with a wooden spoon." The rest of the film is in flashback, starting with Carlito being let out of jail after serving only five years of a 30-year-sentence and leading back up to that gunshot.

Continue reading: Carlito's Way Review

Punch-Drunk Love Review


OK
Most wouldn't put Paul Thomas Anderson and the genre of romantic comedy in the same room and expect them to work together well. The director of Magnolia and Boogie Nights tends to shy from the formulaic filmmaking inherent in warming the hearts of couples, and that's certainly not the purpose of Punch-Drunk Love. The problem is defining just exactly what that purpose is to begin with.

The estimable Emily Watson plays Lena Leonard, Barry Egan's (Adam Sandler) ultimate dream woman. In fact, she's everyone's vision of virtue in her ability to ignore or simply not care about whatever foolish stunt Barry pulls. Perhaps, as the heavy-laid music at one point suggests, the very attraction is that she is so normal while he is such a buffoon. Once you get over the idea that love at first sight with two eclectic characters would be cute, something has to provoke you to root for the cause, and whatever that could have been never happens.

Continue reading: Punch-Drunk Love Review

Sam The Man Review


Bad
Gary Winick's first -- and biggest -- gaffe is in casting uber-nerd Fisher "Johnny Five!" Stevens as a slick lothario that beds countless women. Christening him "The Man" in the film's title is just adding insult to injury.

And so we come to the strange, sad, and rather crass case of Sam the Man, a creepy and just plain wrong romantic dramedy that's got no romance, few laughs, minimal drama, and a parade of hateful characters. Wrap them up in a cheap, out-of-focus, underlit, and inaudible package shot on cheap digital video, and the recipe for disaster is complete. Microwave on high for three minutes.

Continue reading: Sam The Man Review

Q & A Review


Good
Sidney Lumet's sprawling cop/DA drama shows promise but ends up muddled and confused, the victim of a few too many subplots and side characters -- all of whom get killed. Nolte is hilariously bad and good at the same time as a corrupt cop, while Hutton is the earnest DA trying to bust him. Remarkably mediocre.

Continue reading: Q & A Review

Waiting Review


Weak
Those who have worked in food service know the challenges and difficulties the trade involves. They also know, as patrons, how to conduct themselves at a restaurant. More likely than not, they have observed a few incidences in which an employee at a restaurant -- quite possibly themselves -- has sought revenge on an especially difficult customer by tampering with the food in nasty, nauseating, stomach-churning ways, and they don't want something similar to happen to them.

I've never worked in food service myself. After watching Waiting, I thank my lucky stars for that. It does not appear to be an overly gratifying profession. Strenuous hours. Difficult bosses. Whining customers. Demanding environment. I have, however, been a difficult customer in the past. Waiting has woken me up to the reality of my nature, and the possible consequences I could receive. It goes without saying that my days as an obstinate customer are over.

Continue reading: Waiting Review

Table One Review


Bad
Bad idea: Make a comedy with nothing but loser guys and no real female parts. Lots of people are gonna line up for that one (Jackass excepted).

The wafer-thin story here, about the misadventures of a group of guys who somewhat foolishly invested in a bar/restaurant and hang out there every night in the hopes of impressing the ladies. Needless to say, they impress no one and end up the same losers 90 minutes later.

Continue reading: Table One Review

Traffic Review


Essential
How do you fight a war when the people that you love are the enemy? When the conflict is in your own neighborhood, or your own house? Such is the dilemma in the exceptional new film about the drug trade in the United States and Mexico, Traffic.

A harrowing and thought-provoking film, Traffic revolves around three intertwining stories of cops, thugs, victims, enforcers, politicians, and the judicial system. The film is based on a British Channel 4 miniseries called Traffik, which traced a drug route from Pakistan through Europe and to Great Britain. Laura Bickford, one of the producers for Traffic, was attracted to the original miniseries because of the intersecting stories, the social commentary on drug usage, and the implication of The System itself being the major perpetrator of drug addiction.

Continue reading: Traffic Review

Double Whammy Review


Weak
Has any film director fallen quite as far as Tom DiCillo? After a masterful debut with his tongue-in-cheek look at filmmaking, Living in Oblivion, DiCillo has turned in a series of progressively more-ignored features, including Box of Moon Light and The Real Blonde. His latest, Double Whammy, is going straight to video, despite a cast that includes Denis Leary and Elizabeth Hurley -- and not in bit parts, either!

The silly, one-joke story is reason enough to find Whammy (not a movie about Press Your Luck!) so inspiring. Leary plays a cop who, only through some fault of his own, is never able to bust a perp. It starts out in a fast food joint, when a gunman drives through the wall and starts shooting. Leary slips and hits his head, and a little bespectacled kid uses his gun to save the day. Later, his apartment supervisor is killed while he's oblivious in the building. Various quirky characters (like Hurley's masseuse) try to distract you into thinking this movie is actually about something, but the deception never works too well.

Continue reading: Double Whammy Review

The Salton Sea Review


Excellent
The imagery of The Salton Sea surpasses standard noir. It's a tale of a desolate man lost in an abyss of emotional turmoil, desperately seeking redemption and revenge against unknown assailants. The film's opening shot of Val Kilmer, sitting on a barren floor surrounded by flames as he pours Miles Davis through his trumpet, delivers both the physical heat of the flames and the fiery, emotional pain of loss locked within his eyes. It's a haunting and eerily tragic moment of humanity displayed at its weakest point of existence.

The story of The Salton Sea is constructed as an updated version of a 1940s noir film. Expertly written by Tony Gayton, the film opens up with a brief history of speed, a crash course complete with 1950s housewives and Japanese kamikaze pilots. Then, the camera quickly navigates through a crazed house party and lands next to a heavily tattooed Kilmer, sitting amongst speed freaks on a four-day binge. Or maybe it's been three days. With a strong voiceover delivered by Kilmer, we learn about the double life he leads. One life is an addict and police informant known as Danny Parker, complete with numerous tats, leather pants, and skull rings on every finger. And another one, locked in his closet, is a trumpeter named Tom Van Allen, whose wife ended up dead years ago at the hands of masked men during a rest stop robbery while vacationing at the Salton Sea.

Continue reading: The Salton Sea Review

Snake Eyes Review


OK
It's not as bad as you've heard, but this De Palma/Cage thriller set entirely at a thrown boxing match in an Atlantic City casino blows multiple opportunities to have a lot of fun within its high-tech environs. Mediocre, but watchable.

The Count Of Monte Cristo Review


Very Good
The classic Monte Cristo sandwich is a rich confection -- almost inedibly so -- composed of layered ham, turkey, swiss cheese, mayonnaise, mustard, and crusty bread, all battered in egg and fried in hot grease. The diner is meant to dip this in jam before shoving it down his gullet.

The 2002 incarnation of The Count of Monte Cristo is a remarkably similar experience, full of pleasing flavors yet probably too rich for everyday consumption -- but, as with all things, I figure you'll eat it if you're hungry enough. Sure enough, in this snail-slow winter movie season, Monte Cristo is just about the best thing going. Like the sandwich, this isn't gourmet fare -- it's a crowd pleaser meant to entertain for a few brief moments, nothing more.

Continue reading: The Count Of Monte Cristo Review

Dumb And Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd Review


Terrible
Dumb and Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd is without doubt the worst movie I've seen in a long time! It hardly warrants the pity star I have to give it because we don't give anything lower! In fact, this movie is so bad that I should, in retrospect, give a half star bump-up to all of the previous films that I've given one star to because they just don't belong in the same company as this film.

Dumberer is the prequel to the hugely successful comedy Dumb and Dumber, starring Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels as two social misfits on a road trip looking for love in their canine car. This time around, we see just how the pair met, and became friends. After being home schooled for years, Harry (Eric Christian Olsen) and Lloyd (Derek Richardson) are finally ready for public high school (either that or their parents got sick of their childishness). As fate would have it, on their first day of school, Harry and Lloyd literally run into each other. Attracted to the other one's stupidity, they not only become inseparable, they also become the first students of the school's new special needs class.

Continue reading: Dumb And Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd Review

Lost & Found Review


Weak

A little perspective before I dive into my review of "Lostand Found": You should know I had been dreading this movie for weeks.I fully expected I would have to restrain myself from walking out in themiddle. I mean, David Spade, that grating, diminutive, sarcastic littleditch rat in dire need of a hair cut from "Saturday Night Live"in a romantic comedy? David Spade getting cozy with the lithe and lovelyFrench actress Sophie Marceau? Oh, puh-leaze!

Having said that, there have been a lot of "SNL"alumni vehicles far worse than this one, which is often funny and occasionallyborders on actual charm.

Giving hope to 98 lb. dorks everywhere, Spade essentiallyplays himself as a struggling restaurateur, who is so smitten with hissupple new neighbor (Marceau) that he kidnaps her ever-errant pooch sohe can play hero by helping her search for the missing mutt and score someface time with the girl.

Continue reading: Lost & Found Review

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World Environment Day: How to stay green at your next festival

World Environment Day: How to stay green at your next festival

Seven ways you can be greener at a music festival.

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Luis Guzman Movies

Puerto Ricans In Paris Trailer

Puerto Ricans In Paris Trailer

Luis and Eddie are police detectives in New York who thrive in their environment and...

Keanu Trailer

Keanu Trailer

Rell has just broken up with his partner and he's in a complete self-absorbed world....

Reclaim Trailer

Reclaim Trailer

Steven (Ryan Phillip) and Shannon (Rachelle Lefevre) want nothing more than to have a child...

In The Blood Trailer

In The Blood Trailer

Ava is skilled at fighting and has left behind a rather shady past to set...

Turbo Movie Review

Turbo Movie Review

Whizzy and superficial, this isn't the most complicated animated film ever made, but it's a...

Turbo Trailer

Turbo Trailer

Turbo has big dreams for such a small garden snail; dreams that stretch beyond his...

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Turbo Trailer

Turbo Trailer

Turbo might be just your average garden snail but there's one thing that sets him...

Turbo Trailer

Turbo Trailer

Turbo is a regular garden snail who, unlike his friends, is bored of living his...

The Last Stand Movie Review

The Last Stand Movie Review

Korean filmmaker Kim played with the Western genre before in his wacky 2008 pastiche The...

Turbo Trailer

Turbo Trailer

Turbo is a garden snail with big dreams of becoming the speediest snail in the...

The Last Stand Trailer

The Last Stand Trailer

Ray Owens is a police sheriff whose major crime fighting days are all but over...

Journey 2: The Mysterious Island Movie Review

Journey 2: The Mysterious Island Movie Review

With just one character from the 2008 adventure, this film does a decent job continuing...

Journey 2: The Mysterious Island Trailer

Journey 2: The Mysterious Island Trailer

Sean Anderson has moved back in with his mother, after embarking on the adventure of...

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