Louise Fletcher

Louise Fletcher

Louise Fletcher Quick Links

News Pictures Film RSS

Eileen Brennan

Stockard Cahnning, Louise Fletcher, Madeline Kahn, Neil Simon, Eileen Brennan, Ann-Margaret, Marsha Mason and Peter Falk - The Cheap Detective (1978) directed by Robert Moore shown clockwise from lower left: Stockard Cahnning, Louise Fletcher, Madeline Kahn, Neil Simon, Eileen Brennan, Ann-Margaret, Marsha Mason center: Peter Falk - United States - Wednesday 26th July 1978

Strange Behavior Review


Weak
Why are you hearing about this 1981 film today? Not because of director and co-writer Michael Laughlin, whose career may have ended after he wrote the notorious Town & Country in 2001.

No, the other writer was Bill Condon, who not only wrote Gods and Monsters, he also wrote the script for Chicago (not that that's such a Herculean effort). So riding on Condon's rising star comes his first film, made when little Bill was just 26 years old. He even appears in the opening scene, sneaking a cigarette before he gets killed (in shadow) as the first of several offings.

Continue reading: Strange Behavior Review

Exorcist II: The Heretic Review


Unbearable
Er, what's that? You didn't understand the intricacies of Exorcist II: The Heretic? What an idiot you are! You've got Linda Blair as a teenager, under hypnosis for most of the movie. You've got James Earl Jones as an African tribal leader. You've got "the good locusts." And you've got Richard Burton as a priest who opens up the whole can of demons afresh! Total, utter nonsense with a bad dub job. Stick with the original, or the next sequel if you must.

Aurora Borealis Review


Terrible
There is poetry to leaving home and starting life, but it only goes so far. The reason films about leaving home always seem to be liked is because we are always leaving one home or another. That line has been used before but the source escapes me. However, the feeling of leaving one home or another shouldn't be everyday business, nor should it be easy. That's where Aurora Borealis comes in.

Duncan (Joshua Jackson) has trouble with keeping jobs. He has a brother who cheats on his wife and a snide attitude. He hangs out with a gang of guys he's known for forever and a day and stiffens up when people bring up his hockey star past. All this changes when he takes a job at the apartment complex where his grandparents live. His grandpa, Ronald (Donald Sutherland), is losing his mind not so gracefully and often jokes about killing himself. His grandma, Ruth (Louise Fletcher), is just trying to keep him together. Then one day, Duncan meets Kate (Juliette Lewis), and all of a sudden life might have a bigger meaning outside of Minneapolis and his love for The Replacements.

Continue reading: Aurora Borealis Review

Finding Home Review


Terrible
Ridiculously awkward direction and poor pacing are only two of the black marks on Finding Home, an overdone family drama that plays like a Hallmark special -- circa 1970s. Directed and co-written by Lawrence D. Folds, creator of action/horror entries like Don't Go Near the Park, this fluffy feature contains a curious combination: lead actors of minimal skill and three supporting actors with top-shelf pasts.

Oddly enough, all three were most visible -- and successful -- during the 1970s and early '80s. Louise Fletcher, noted for her Oscar-winning turn as Nurse Ratched in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, plays the just-deceased grandmother of the story, remembered lovingly through flashbacks; Jason Miller, intense Oscar nominee for The Exorcist, is here as grandma's helpful estate attorney; and Geneviève Bujold (Tightrope, Choose Me, Dead Ringers) plays the caretaker of the Maine lakeside inn Grandma owned for decades.

Continue reading: Finding Home Review

Big Eden Review


Grim
Arye Gross plays the shortest gay man alive in Big Eden. In this little indie, Gross returns to a small Montana town to care for his grandfather where he finds that gays are -- gulp -- embraced, not shunned. He quickly gets involved in a love triangle with two men who literally tower over him. If this wasn't so absurd and corny it might be sweet. But it cetainly doesn't look like any Montana town I've ever heard of.

Manna From Heaven Review


Terrible
The five precocious Burton sisters of Buffalo, NY have given us a precocious film about a group of people so hateful we are forced to try our best to simply ignore them. How's that for skipping the first day of Filmmaking 101?

Manna From Heaven is the story of a Buffalo family who one day discover $20,000 "raining from heaven," wisely decide to split it up, and then go on their merry ways. A decade or so later, every last one of them has grown up to be a loser, having squandered his or her (mostly her) share of the loot. The lone exception is Theresa (Ursula Burton... well of course the good one is going to be played by a Burton sister!) who has become an ash-on-the-forehead nun. In fact, Theresa becomes convinced that the 20 grand of so long ago was not a gift but a loan, and that they must now "pay it back."

Continue reading: Manna From Heaven Review

Tryst Review


Unbearable
Absolutely ridiculous, Tryst features Oscar-winner Louise Fletcher as a housekeeper tangled up in an idiotic plot that revolves around a wealthy man, his porn-starrish wife (Carrera), the maid's long-lost adopted son, his pissy girlfriend, a Norman Bates-ish motel owner, and a murder plot that (of course) revolves around a fat will being paid out. To compare this to a late-night, Cinemax soft-core porn movie is an insult to late-night, Cinemax soft-core porn. Utterly predictable, atrociously acted, and nigh unwatchable.

Exorcist II: The Heretic Review


Unbearable
Er, what's that? You didn't understand the intricacies of Exorcist II: The Heretic? What an idiot you are! You've got Linda Blair as a teenager, under hypnosis for most of the movie. You've got James Earl Jones as an African tribal leader. You've got "the good locusts." And you've got Richard Burton as a priest who opens up the whole can of demons afresh! Total, utter nonsense with a bad dub job. Stick with the original, or the next sequel if you must.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest Review


Essential
Nicholson went nuts in The Shining, but he did the time in Cuckoo's Nest as a rough-and-tumble felon looking to escape hard prison by spending a little quality time in a psychiatric institution. Little does he realize his phony illness is about to get him into all kinds of trouble. Louise Fletcher's Nurse Ratched, however, is the character who has since entered into the American lexicon, as have a host of other characters and scenes (most memorably: Nicholson's narration of a World Series game that's not on TV). Faithfully adapted from Ken Kesey's stirring novel.

Continue reading: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest Review

Strange Behavior Review


Weak
Why are you hearing about this 1981 film today? Not because of director and co-writer Michael Laughlin, whose career may have ended after he wrote the notorious Town & Country in 2001.

No, the other writer was Bill Condon, who not only wrote Gods and Monsters, he also wrote the script for Chicago (not that that's such a Herculean effort). So riding on Condon's rising star comes his first film, made when little Bill was just 26 years old. He even appears in the opening scene, sneaking a cigarette before he gets killed (in shadow) as the first of several offings.

Continue reading: Strange Behavior Review

Invaders from Mars Review


Terrible
Hunter Carson describes one of the titular invaders as "a giant Mr. Potato Head" and that's about as spot on a description you can get for the plasticine mind-suckers that come to earth to take over our hero's parents' brains. Unbearable special effects are the worst part of this remake of the 1953 classic; the rest of the movie is merely forgettable.

Cruel Intentions Review


OK

"Cruel Intentions" is literally "Dangerous Liaisons" transplanted to present-day Upper East Side Manhattan and featuring ruthless teenagers playing sexual power games instead of 18th Century French aristocrats.

As such, I fully expected it to be dumbed down beyond all recognition. I expected "Dangerous Liaisons 90210." But I can admit when I'm wrong.

Sexy, savage and succulent, with deliciously cruel and manipulative performances by Ryan Phillippe and Sarah Michelle Gellar in the John Malkovich and Glenn Close roles, in its own way this fourth film adaptation of Choderlos De Laclos' scandalous 1782 novel "Les Liaisons Dangereuses" rivals the Malkovich-Close magnum opus in sophistication, dexterity and scintillating deviousness.

Continue reading: Cruel Intentions Review

A Map Of The World Review


Weak

"Map of the World" is a slice-of-life tale of emotional anguish that gives the capable, wonderful Sigourney Weaver her first truly challenging role in ages.

As a once unflappable rural wife facing overwhelming calamity when a neighbor's daughter drowns in her backyard pond, Weaver offers up an oddly droll but moving depiction of the pressures and joys of ordinary motherhood, fallen under a very dark cloud.

Riddled with guilt and self-loathing, Alice (Weaver) retires to bed for days at a time. She neglects her own two girls and leaves managing the household to her neglectful but hard-working, farmer husband (David Strathairn). Then, as if she's being tested on a Biblical scale, misfortune strikes again: A temperamental child at the elementary school where she's a nurse invents misguided charges of molestation against her.

Continue reading: A Map Of The World Review

Louise Fletcher

Louise Fletcher Quick Links

News Pictures Film RSS