In the recent past, it was the policy of Chinese authorities to protect home-produced movies from competition from Hollywood blockbusters. But the success of the domestic film Tiny Times, which has become China's top box-office attraction -- it has earned $57 million since June 27, beating Man of Steel for the top spot -- is likely to result in a relaxation of that policy. The Chinese state-run Xinhua news agency also noted that the film has also stirred up a cultural controversy inasmuch as it focuses on four female college students in Shanghai who live in dorms decked out with goods from Hermes, Louis Vuitton, Dior and other high-fashion outfits. (There was no indication in the article whether the producers received product-placement remuneration from those designer labels.) The ostentatious shows of luxury goods and clothing have been criticized for distorting the values of young audiences, wrote Xinhua, presumably voicing the attitude of Communist cultural officials. However, it quoted 30-year-old director Guo Jingming as saying, It is normal for people to pursue a better life and there is nothing wrong with enjoying it. Guo said that his aim is to make films that can be unique in audience's hearts and ... [remembered]. If they think it's too ordinary, it is a failure to me.