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Everything You Always Wanted To Know About Sex * But Were Afraid To Ask Review


Excellent
A minor classic and Woody Allen's most absurd film ever, this series of seven short vignettes is worth a look for its '70s fueled humor and sex-crazed hysterics. Based on (well, not really -- inspired by, let's say) the watershed book, Allen indulges in homages to everyone from Scorsese to Kubrick to Fellini, with stops along the way for his traditional neurotic filmmaking style. The stories are goofs on cross-dressing, beastiality, sex in public, and more. Perhaps the most notorious moment involves an enormous breast rampaging the countryside, and the "What's My Perversion?" sketch (a riff on What's My Line?, starring Jack Barry as himself) is classic. Pricelessly ridiculous.

A Kid For Two Farthings Review


OK
What's a farthing? Well in old Britain, it was a quarter of a penny. Not a hell of a lot.

What's a kid? Well in this case, it's a baby goat with a misshapen horn... and our little hero Joe (Jonathan Ashmore, in his sole film role) thinks that kid's a unicorn. Or as he screeches endlessly, "A you-neeeee-corn!!!!"

Continue reading: A Kid For Two Farthings Review

Roseland Review


OK
Christopher Walken's appearance here -- in a very early role, a year before his breakout in The Deer Hunter -- is the primary (if not the only) reason to check out Roseland, which also happens to be an early Merchant-Ivory collaboration, too. Roseland is a movie about the eponymous New York dance hall, set in the 1970s (I'm estimating), and comprising three stories set in its cavernous environs.

Barely connected, the middle segment is Walken's -- cleverly titled "The Hustle" -- as he plays a gigolo working three different women, each with different needs and different issues. Walken hadn't created his signature speaking cadence yet, and it's shocking not only to hear him deliver lines in a relatively normal voice, but also with such a large pompadour. This is also Walken's first film where his masterful dancing is on display (see also 1981's Pennies from Heaven) -- and fans of "Weapon of Choice" will definitely want to check out a little vintage Walken high step here.

Continue reading: Roseland Review

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