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Special Screening Of 'The Great Gatsby' At The Museum Of Modern Art - Arrivals

Lois Chiles - Special screening of 'The Great Gatsby' at the Museum of Modern Art - Arrivals - New York City, NY, United States - Sunday 5th May 2013

Lois Chiles
Lois Chiles
Lois Chiles

Moonraker Review


OK
Most rational observers agree that Moonraker is without a doubt the most absurd James Bond movie -- definitely of the Roger Moore era and possibly of all time. And it's exactly that ridiculousness that makes it so enjoyable. Here we have a villain (Michael Lonsdale) who builds a giant space fleet with the goal of living in his secret space station while he poisons all humans on earth (he's building a "perfect" society) -- and he wears a suit the entire time, even while flying his Moonraker spacecraft! Bond's adventures are suitably globetrotting -- and of course, this is the only film where he actually got to go into space, thanks to his cohort, Holly Goodhead (Lois Chiles). In addition to the unforgettable Jaws (Richard Kiel), the film features what might be the best double entendre ever, this one from Q as Bond is seen coupling with Holly in low-grav as he orbits the earth: "I think he's attempting re-entry!" I'll say.

Continue reading: Moonraker Review

The Way We Were Review


Grim
Robert Redford and Barbra Streisand star in a multi-year romantic drama that comes off as about as believable as a love affair between myself and a potted plant. Widely loathed for its sacharrine approach (and Streisand's acting), the shrill Ms. Babs is so unsympathetic as the local communist sympathiser that you can't help but be aghast in wonder over why Redford's character would possibly see anything in her. Of course, this film had a popular song come from it (see if you can guess what it was, Einstein), and a legion of Babs fans believe their goddess can do no wrong, so, for better or worse, The Way We Were is going to be with us as a "classic" romance for some time to come.

Broadcast News Review


Good
Rather dated now, this acclaimed tragicomedy about the network news sheds a little light on how the news gets made -- namely about how pretty boy anchormen are fed everything they say -- but its romance falls on the flat side. Holly Hunter (hard-boiled producer) and William Hurt (aforementioned pretty boy) are just too mismatched to make for a believable pair, and quirky Albert Brooks (geeky reporter) would never in a million years be allowed on the air. It's absurd but often funny, usually when it's dissecting the TV trade.

Moonraker Review


OK
Most rational observers agree that Moonraker is without a doubt the most absurd James Bond movie -- definitely of the Roger Moore era and possibly of all time. And it's exactly that ridiculousness that makes it so enjoyable. Here we have a villain (Michael Lonsdale) who builds a giant space fleet with the goal of living in his secret space station while he poisons all humans on earth (he's building a "perfect" society) -- and he wears a suit the entire time, even while flying his Moonraker spacecraft! Bond's adventures are suitably globetrotting -- and of course, this is the only film where he actually got to go into space, thanks to his cohort, Holly Goodhead (Lois Chiles). In addition to the unforgettable Jaws (Richard Kiel), the film features what might be the best double entendre ever, this one from Q as Bond is seen coupling with Holly in low-grav as he orbits the earth: "I think he's attempting re-entry!" I'll say.

The Great Gatsby Review


Grim
Your high school English teacher was right: F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby really is one of the best American novels of the 20th century, and if you weren't paying attention back in school, you should read it again right away. Will watching the 1974 film version of The Great Gatsby serve as an acceptable shortcut? No. Sadly, the movie treats Fitzgerald's flawless novel as little more than a Jazz-age costume drama, and it goes heavy on the costumes, light on the drama.

Adapted for the screen by Francis Ford Coppola in just three weeks after Truman Capote was fired (so the story goes), Gatsby tells the story of the mysterious and elusive Jay Gatsby (Robert Redford), a superrich businessman who likes to throw wild weekend-long, gin-soaked parties at his sprawling Long Island estate. But who is he? Where did he come from? Rumors abound, but no one seems to know for sure, and as long as the band keeps playing and the booze keeps flowing, no one seems to care all that much.

Continue reading: The Great Gatsby Review

Lois Chiles

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