Lisa Henson

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Alexander And The Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad Day Review


Good

There's nothing wrong with this bright and goofy family comedy, but there's nothing much to it either. As a bit of mindless entertainment, the film is smart and funny enough to keep audiences entertained, spinning a swirling vortex of bad luck and wacky slapstick around one lively family. But it's utterly weightless, without even a hint of an edge, and anyone who loathes either nutty physical gags or sappy sentimentality should steer well clear.

Everyone in the audience can understand how Alexander (Ed Oxenbould) feels: he's fed up with the fact that no one notices that his life is just one humiliation after another, so on his 12th birthday he wishes that his family would have a taste of his misfortune. Sure enough, everything that can go wrong does. Dad Ben (Steve Carell) has to take the baby with him to an important job interview; mom Kelly (Jennifer Garner) has a work event go horribly wrong; teen brother Anthony (Dylan Minnette) struggles to make prom night special for his demanding-diva girlfriend (Bella Thorne); and middle sister Emile (Kerris Dorsey) gets ill on opening night of the school play she's starring in. On the other hand, Alexander's day isn't so bad, as he finally catches the eye of cute girl Becky (Sidney Fullmer).

The plot is laid out as a series of minor calamities that escalate to crazed proportions as the day goes on, but only until the screenwriter decides to have mercy on the characters and let them bond to face the mayhem. Frankly, this is such a wildly happy family that nothing about the film is believable: their problems exist strictly for laughs. Thankful, most of the set pieces are genuinely funny due to the up-for-it actors, who make the most of their characters and the connections between them. There's also a terrific stream of cameo roles for comedy aces like Megan Mullally (Will & Grace), Jennifer Coolidge (American Pie) and Donald Glover (Parks and Recreation). Dick Van Dyke even makes a witty appearance as himself.

Continue reading: Alexander And The Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad Day Review

Lisa Henson and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame - Leron Gubler, Rich Ross, Lisa Henson, Sean Henson Tuesday 20th March 2012 The Muppets are honored with a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

Lisa Henson and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame

MirrorMask Review


Good
If the 1980s Bowie/puppet fantasy campfest Labyrinth had been redone by British Dali fetishists with a deep love of The Wizard of Oz, the result might have been something like the ambitious but flawed MirrorMask. A joining of forces between the dark imaginations of graphic novel auteurs Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean (screenwriter and director, respectively) and the technological prowess of the Jim Henson Workshop, it attempts to create a more substantive cinematic fantasy world than today's SpongeBob and Playstation-besotted kids may be used to. As such, this admittedly stupendous-looking film deserves quite a lot of credit for trying, even if the end result never quite makes it.

A central problem with MirrorMask is that the story (as will be obvious even to those not familiar with Gaiman and McKean's work on such landmark graphic novels as Sandman and Books of Magic) is something the two of them could have dashed off in one coffee-fueled afternoon. Helena (Stephanie Leonidas) is an angry teenager whose parents (Gina McKee, Rob Brydon), to her eternal dismay, run a tatty circus that takes up all their time. As a family crisis comes to a boil - Mum goes into hospital while Dad tries to keep everything from falling apart and the circus employees wonder how they're going to get paid - Helen, who'd much rather have normal parents than eccentric showpeople, falls into a dream world where she's on a quest to find the MirrorMask, a magical object that will allow her to escape the Dark Lands and return to her family. Maybe. She just has to figure out what the MirrorMask is. And what it looks like.

Continue reading: MirrorMask Review

MirrorMask Review


Good
If the 1980s Bowie/puppet fantasy campfest Labyrinth had been redone by British Dali fetishists with a deep love of The Wizard of Oz, the result might have been something like the ambitious but flawed MirrorMask. A joining of forces between the dark imaginations of graphic novel auteurs Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean (screenwriter and director, respectively) and the technological prowess of the Jim Henson Workshop, it attempts to create a more substantive cinematic fantasy world than today's SpongeBob and Playstation-besotted kids may be used to. As such, this admittedly stupendous-looking film deserves quite a lot of credit for trying, even if the end result never quite makes it.

A central problem with MirrorMask is that the story (as will be obvious even to those not familiar with Gaiman and McKean's work on such landmark graphic novels as Sandman and Books of Magic) is something the two of them could have dashed off in one coffee-fueled afternoon. Helena (Stephanie Leonidas) is an angry teenager whose parents (Gina McKee, Rob Brydon), to her eternal dismay, run a tatty circus that takes up all their time. As a family crisis comes to a boil - Mum goes into hospital while Dad tries to keep everything from falling apart and the circus employees wonder how they're going to get paid - Helen, who'd much rather have normal parents than eccentric showpeople, falls into a dream world where she's on a quest to find the MirrorMask, a magical object that will allow her to escape the Dark Lands and return to her family. Maybe. She just has to figure out what the MirrorMask is. And what it looks like.

Continue reading: MirrorMask Review

Zero Effect Review


Excellent
Story of an anti-hero: Darryl Zero is a drugged-out P.I.... but he's brilliant. Great roles for Pullman and Stiller. Written and directed by Larence Kasdan's son.

Good Boy! Review


Good
Man's best friend: an expression used for ages to describe the relationship between people and their dogs. Rarely has there been a need to question a canine's faith, but after watching Good Boy!, it makes me wonder if what we've been saying for years is right.

Twelve year-old Owen Baker (Liam Aiken) has spent his summer break walking the neighborhood dogs to prove to his parents (Molly Shannon and Kevin Nealon) that he is responsible enough to have a dog of his own. The dog Owen eventually adopts, which he names Hubble, proves to be much smarter than the ordinary canine; Hubble instantly knows how to sit, stay, roll over, and even play dead. Based on his previous training experience, Owen finds this degree of intelligence extremely odd. In search of answers, late one night Owen follows Hubble into the woods near their home; there he sees his new dog communicating with a bright light in the sky.

Continue reading: Good Boy! Review

Lisa Henson

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'Phiona Is All Of Us': Alicia Keys Explains Why 'Queen Of Katwe' Is Such An Important Story

'Phiona Is All Of Us': Alicia Keys Explains Why 'Queen Of Katwe' Is Such An Important Story

The Disney chess movie is set for release on September 30th.

Gold - Trailer

Gold - Trailer

Gold is more than a valuable commodity for Kenny Wells, to him it's an obsession.

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'L.A. Confidential' And '8 Mile' Director Curtis Hanson Has Died At 71

'L.A. Confidential' And '8 Mile' Director Curtis Hanson Has Died At 71

The filmmaker is remembered by the numerous actors he worked with.

Did Ryan Gosling And Eva Mendes Secretly Tie The Knot?

Did Ryan Gosling And Eva Mendes Secretly Tie The Knot?

Reports say the couple secretly wed earlier this year.

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Lisa Henson Movies

Alexander and the Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad Day Movie Review

Alexander and the Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad Day Movie Review

There's nothing wrong with this bright and goofy family comedy, but there's nothing much to...

MirrorMask Movie Review

MirrorMask Movie Review

If the 1980s Bowie/puppet fantasy campfest Labyrinth had been redone by British Dali fetishists with...

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MirrorMask Movie Review

MirrorMask Movie Review

If the 1980s Bowie/puppet fantasy campfest Labyrinth had been redone by British Dali fetishists with...

Good Boy! Movie Review

Good Boy! Movie Review

Man's best friend: an expression used for ages to describe the relationship between people and...

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