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Non-Stop Trailer


Bill Marks is a U.S. federal air marshal who ironically can't stand plane journeys. His hatred for flying is only about to get a lot worse when an anonymous person breaks through the secure network on his phone to send him a threatening text explaining that they're going to kill a person on the plane every twenty minutes unless $150 million is transferred to an offshore account number. With the crew sceptical that anything's amiss and insisting that no-one could get away with murder on a 6 hour flight between the States and the UK, Bill is forced to search for the culprit alone - but time is running out as the first victim is discovered. When it is revealed that the account number is actually in his name, news spreads across the world that he has hijacked the flight and he is forced to defend himself while keeping everybody else from being harmed.

This high-action mystery thriller will have you on the edge of seat this winter with an almost impossible to believe cat and mouse chase. 'Non-Stop' has been directed by Jaume Collet-Serra ('Orphan', 'Unknown', 'House Of Wax') and written by Ryan Engle ('On a Clear Day') and John W. Richardson and Christopher Roach in their feature screenwriting debuts. It is set to be released in the UK on February 28th 2014.

Directed by: Jaume Collet-Serra

Continue: Non-Stop Trailer

Linus Roache - Vineyard Theatre's 30th Anniversary Gala held at the Edison Ballroom - Arrivals - New York City, NY, United States - Monday 18th March 2013

Linus Roache
Linus Roache

Linus Roache and Heather Burns - Linus Roache and Heather Burns New York City, USA - Opening night of the Off-Broadway production of 'Middletown' at the Vineyard Theatre - Post Show Wednesday 3rd November 2010

Linus Roache and Heather Burns
Linus Roache and Heather Burns
Linus Roache and Heather Burns
Linus Roache
Linus Roache
Linus Roache

Linus Roache and Heather Burns - Johanna Day, Linus Roache, Heather Burns New York City, USA - Opening night of the Off-Broadway production of 'Middletown' at the Vineyard Theatre - Curtain Call. Wednesday 3rd November 2010

Linus Roache and Heather Burns
Linus Roache and Heather Burns
Linus Roache and Heather Burns
Linus Roache and Heather Burns
Linus Roache and Heather Burns
Linus Roache and Heather Burns

Yonkers Joe Review


Good
Making a film about a scam artist is probably a lot like being one -- no matter how solid an idea seems, it's really all about the execution. The life of a cheat lends itself to high drama and conflict, but it can also be riddled with clichés. Throw in a mentally disabled son and a shot at the big score, and you've got a combination of storylines so obvious, they seem destined to fail. But Yonkers Joe doesn't fail. It's a spunky little indie that succeeds past its cheap conventions.

Both the credit and the blame go to writer-director Robert Celestino. His cornball plot shouldn't work, but his direction, especially with actors, does. Chazz Palminteri (Celestino's executive producer) is the title guy, a gambling stiff with an amazing ability to cheat crap games. He'll belly up to a table, pull some David Blaine-like moves to drop tainted dice into a game, and make a fortune. Unfortunately, Atlantic City security has his number, and private games are too small for his ambitions.

Continue reading: Yonkers Joe Review

Linus Roache - Alana De La Garza, Linus Roache and Anthony Anderson Wednesday 11th June 2008 at Monte Carlo Television Festival Monte Carlo, Monaco

Linus Roache
Linus Roache and Dick Wolf
Linus Roache

Linus Roache - Alana De La Garza, Linus Roache, Anthony Anderson Wednesday 11th June 2008 at Monte Carlo Television Festival Monte Carlo, Monaco

Linus Roache
Linus Roache

The Chronicles Of Riddick Review


Weak
A befuddled attempt to give Vin Diesel his own franchise series - now that he's ditched giving the XXX thing another whirl - The Chronicles of Riddick stomps onto screens with an attitude that's somehow both obtuse and far too simplistic. This sequel of sorts to writer/director David Twohy's Pitch Black takes one of that film's sole survivors, the titular shaven-headed and silver-eyed criminal (Vin Diesel), and drops him into the middle of a byzantine interstellar conflict that's about as easy to parse out as one of Frank Herbert's Dune novels.

At the start of the film, Riddick is being chased on a remote, frozen planet by some bounty hunters, whom he promptly dispatches and steals their ship to ride back to the planet of Helios Prime, where their employer was from. Once there, he finds out the bounty was put on him by one of Pitch Black's other survivors, Imam (Keith David, resplendent in flowing robes and a sharp goatee). Apparently, Imam and Aereon (Judi Dench), an ambassador from a ghost-like race called the Elementals, think that Riddick, being a member of the Furion race, will be able to help the galaxy fight off an onslaught of planet-destroying religious fanatics called Necromongers. The Necromongers are on a galactic jihad to bring about something called "the Underverse" and will convert or kill anybody in their path. But, before any of this can really be figured out, the Necromongers' gigantic armada crashes down on Helios Prime and things get really complicated. There's about ten minutes' worth of action that takes place later in a prison which, even now, after much contemplation, still makes absolutely no sense.

Continue reading: The Chronicles Of Riddick Review

Twelve And Holding Review


Excellent
Being a kid is awkward and awful, but not in the stick-your-penis-in-a-pie way and certainly not the Peter Pan way. Situations that you can't even fathom happen ad nauseum from ages 11 to 19 on account of wild hormones. After that, the consensus would be to consult some sort of psychiatrist. Hollywood has somehow turned all these stories and occurrences into redemptive stories where every transgression is purely sexual and where things aren't fully blamed on anyone. Even if someone is blamed, the blame is nonchalant and patched up with a simple hug.Michael Cuesta announced himself in 2001 with the vicious and viciously underrated drama L.I.E., which offered a mind-blowing performance from Brian Cox as an aged pedophile and a young, strikingly good Paul Dano as the young poet who befriends him. If the film had any real flaw, it was that it was too stiff; things seemed to structured for a story that was so amorphous and daring.Cuesta now returns packing fire and ravaging humor with Twelve and Holding, an unyieldingly dark look at adolescence and neglect. It starts easy: four kids, all at age 12, sit and watch fireworks at a neighborhood block party. There's Rudy and Jacob (both played by amazing newcomer Conor Donovan), twin brothers to a pair of steady-as-she-goes parents. Their only physical distinguishing trait is a large, purple birthmark on Jacob's face. Then there's Leonard (Jesse Camacho), the terribly overweight offspring of two fat-and-loving-it parents (mom: Marcia Debonis, dad: Tom McGowan). Lastly, there's sweet Malee (Zoe Weizenbaum), who tries to make the most of a psychiatrist mother (Annabella Sciorra) and a no-show dad.Their lives get tossed when Rudy is accidentally burned alive during a prank. Suddenly, Leonard wants to lose weight, Malee gets the hots for one of her mom's patients (stunning Jeremy Renner) and Jacob begins to take out his rage over his brother's death by visiting the kid who's responsible in a juvenile detention center. None of their parents are interested or really take notice of this behavior. Leonard's mother (Debonis works miracles with a tough role) is downright opposed to her son's new found love for health; he refuses to eat any of her fried chicken and opts for apples and salad instead. Malee begins a friendship with the patient and begins to obsess about him and his favorite song, Blue Öyster Cult's "Burning for You," which is used in a terrific scene not unlike the way "Hey You" was used in last year's The Squid and the Whale. Jacob begins to befriend the prankster, but things take a major dark turn for all three.Twelve and Holding encapsulates everything one could hope for from a sophomore effort. Cuesta's style has become more defined and, with ample help from cinematographer Romeo Tirone, his imagery has become even more stirring and efficient. His work with actors has become a thing of beauty: all the child actors are fantastic and the supporting cast gives a resonant tone to the children's world. Cuesta, working from a remarkable script from first-timer Anthony Cipriano, makes sure to define the parents but makes them the ghostly apparitions that the kids see them as. When Leonard finally takes action with his mother, the way he deals with her is still in the way of forced neglect. Squirming in their seats and foreheads cringed, parents might find themselves rushing home from Cuesta's tarnished scrapbook of forgotten embarrassment to spend time with their tykes.

Find Me Guilty Review


Terrible

There's a serious losing streak as far as "true stories" in cinema are going. It's an open invitation to drizzle overdone sentimentality and turn crass tear-jerking into box office gold (see Glory Road or North Country?). That being said, that kind of stuff is spun gold in the face of the haphazard bile that is being thrown at the audience in Sidney Lumet's latest film, Find Me Guilty.

The film opens with Tony Campagna (Raul Esparza) making a panicked phone call to an unnamed person. He immediately goes from there to the home of his cousin, "Fat Jack" DiNorscio, a lone shark and cocaine dealer, and shoots him five times. For reasons unknown, DiNorscio survives, but refuses to rat on Tony. To him, ratting on family and friends is worse than death, and he tells his daughter that as she sits next to his hospital bed. Soon enough, Jack is in jail and part of a massive trial with most of the New Jersey crime family. In court, Jack befriends a lawyer (Peter Dinklage) but refuses his council, deciding to represent himself instead, against the wishes of mob boss Nick Calabrese (Alex Rocco). DiNorscio makes terrible jokes, but like all naïve if not honest men, he's endearing in a certain way, especially to Judge Finestein (Ron Silver). His charming and quirky attitude in court is hard to stand but seems to work on the jury, as they go in the room to deliberate on what would become the longest court case in U.S. history.

Continue reading: Find Me Guilty Review

The Forgotten Review


Good
Wrap your brain around this one. It has been 14 months since grieving mother Telly Paretta (Julianne Moore) lost her son, Sam, in a plane crash that took the lives of 10 other children. She's been seeing a psychiatrist (Gary Sinise) on a regular basis, and the shrink has helped her cope with her sadness as the two discuss how difficult it is to let memories of loved ones fade.

Until one day, when all the physical mementos of Sam actually do disappear from Telly's life. Photo albums once filled with snapshots are now blank. Actual fade or Photoshop trick? Drawers that held baseball gloves and caps are now empty. Something wicked this way comes.

Continue reading: The Forgotten Review

The Gathering Storm Review


Very Good
Good TV but still obviously TV. Albert Finney has labored over his doppelganger of Winston Churchill, seen here in the years leading up to WWII, from when no one took him seriously in Parliament to his dominating stint as Prime Minister. I learned a lot about Chuchill in The Gathering Storm, but it still felt a bit like I was taking my medicine. Full of great performances but somehow soulless.

The Chronicles Of Riddick Review


Weak
A befuddled attempt to give Vin Diesel his own franchise series - now that he's ditched giving the XXX thing another whirl - The Chronicles of Riddick stomps onto screens with an attitude that's somehow both obtuse and far too simplistic. This sequel of sorts to writer/director David Twohy's Pitch Black takes one of that film's sole survivors, the titular shaven-headed and silver-eyed criminal (Vin Diesel), and drops him into the middle of a byzantine interstellar conflict that's about as easy to parse out as one of Frank Herbert's Dune novels.

At the start of the film, Riddick is being chased on a remote, frozen planet by some bounty hunters, whom he promptly dispatches and steals their ship to ride back to the planet of Helios Prime, where their employer was from. Once there, he finds out the bounty was put on him by one of Pitch Black's other survivors, Imam (Keith David, resplendent in flowing robes and a sharp goatee). Apparently, Imam and Aereon (Judi Dench), an ambassador from a ghost-like race called the Elementals, think that Riddick, being a member of the Furion race, will be able to help the galaxy fight off an onslaught of planet-destroying religious fanatics called Necromongers. The Necromongers are on a galactic jihad to bring about something called "the Underverse" and will convert or kill anybody in their path. But, before any of this can really be figured out, the Necromongers' gigantic armada crashes down on Helios Prime and things get really complicated. There's about ten minutes' worth of action that takes place later in a prison which, even now, after much contemplation, still makes absolutely no sense.

Continue reading: The Chronicles Of Riddick Review

Beyond Borders Review


Terrible
Anyone with a minimum television I.Q, who has seen Sally Struthers' infomercials, knows there are people in the world who are suffering. For most civil wars or cases of starvation, there is an admirable and often thankless effort by those more fortunate to help these people. Beyond Borders glorifies this crusade, yet the movie does nothing to explain the importance of the effort or why so many are willing to risk their lives to help. It seems totally content to use this humanitarian effort as a means to tell a listless and insulting romance.

Angelina Jolie is Sara Jordan, an American in London who is trapped in a meaningless life and a dismal marriage. At a humanitarian aid concert, she meets a crusader named Nick Callahan (Clive Owen) whose passion for helping the less fortunate gives her life a new direction. For the next 11 years, the lovestruck Sarah abandons her son and husband (Linus Roache) to fund and follow doctor Nick's efforts as he travels to some of the world's most desolate places: the Ethiopian desert, the jungles of Cambodia, and the snow-covered slopes of Chechnya.

Continue reading: Beyond Borders Review

The Chronicles Of Riddick Review


Weak

Writer-director David Twohy creates an uncommonly vivid and comprehensive science-fiction universe in "The Chronicles of Riddick," complete with genuinely otherworldly planets and detailed cultural mythologies. But he spends so much time and energy on such minutiae that the film fails to live up to the promise of it all. His manifold details serve a standard action-star-against-an-army plot with substandard catch-phrase dialogue.

The title character and reluctant hero -- a ruthlessly efficient, prison-buffed mass-murderer with night-vision eyes played by thunder-voiced, chrome-domed Vin Diesel -- was first seen in Twohy's "Pitch Black," a seat-gripping, even more vivid and otherworldly alien-swarm horror flick from 2000 that helped launch the actor's tough-guy career.

Riddick saved a few crash-landed space-transport passengers from being eaten alive by spectacular CGI monsters in that movie, but when "Chronicles" picks up five years later, bounty hunters are still hot on the trail of the coldblooded escapee. The biggest reward isn't being offered for his capture, however. One of the "Pitch Black's" survivors (Keith David) is seeking Riddick's vicious muscle to help save his homeworld from an unstoppable evil.

Continue reading: The Chronicles Of Riddick Review

Linus Roache

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Linus Roache Movies

Non-Stop Trailer

Non-Stop Trailer

Bill Marks is a U.S. federal air marshal who ironically can't stand plane journeys. His...

The Chronicles of Riddick Movie Review

The Chronicles of Riddick Movie Review

A befuddled attempt to give Vin Diesel his own franchise series - now that he's...

The Forgotten Movie Review

The Forgotten Movie Review

Wrap your brain around this one. It has been 14 months since grieving mother Telly...

The Chronicles of Riddick Movie Review

The Chronicles of Riddick Movie Review

A befuddled attempt to give Vin Diesel his own franchise series - now that he's...

Beyond Borders Movie Review

Beyond Borders Movie Review

Anyone with a minimum television I.Q, who has seen Sally Struthers' infomercials, knows there are...

Batman Begins Movie Review

Batman Begins Movie Review

Taking a cue from Sam Raimi's wildly successful "Spider-Man"movies, writer David S. Goyer ("Blade"and its...

The Chronicles Of Riddick Movie Review

The Chronicles Of Riddick Movie Review

Writer-director David Twohy creates an uncommonly vivid and comprehensive science-fiction universe in "The Chronicles of...

The Forgotten Movie Review

The Forgotten Movie Review

Like an "X-Files" episode with a civilian redhead (instead of an FBI agent) up to...

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