Linda Hunt

Linda Hunt

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NCIS Celebrate 100th Episode

Eric Christian Olsen, R. Scott Gemmill, John Peter Kousakis, Chris O'Donnell, Daniela Ruah, Linda Hunt, Renée Felice Smith, Barrett Foa, LL Cool J and Shane Brennan - Cast and crew of NCIS: LOS ANGELES on set for a cake-cutting to celebrate the filming of their 100th episode. (Episode to air on Tuesday, October 15th) - LA, CA, United States - Friday 23rd August 2013

Eric Christian Olsen, R. Scott Gemmill, John Peter Kousakis, Chris O'Donnell, Daniela Ruah, Linda Hunt, Renée Felice Smith, Barrett Foa, LL Cool J and Shane Brennan
Eric Christian Olsen, R. Scott Gemmill, John Peter Kousakis, Chris O'Donnell, Daniela Ruah, Linda Hunt, Renée Felice Smith, Barrett Foa, LL Cool J and Shane Brennan
Eric Christian Olsen, R. Scott Gemmill, John Peter Kousakis, Chris O'Donnell, Daniela Ruah, Linda Hunt, Renée Felice Smith, Barrett Foa, LL Cool J and Shane Brennan
Eric Christian Olsen, R. Scott Gemmill, John Peter Kousakis, Chris O'Donnell, Daniela Ruah, Linda Hunt, Renée Felice Smith, Barrett Foa, LL Cool J and Shane Brennan
Eric Christian Olsen, R. Scott Gemmill, John Peter Kousakis, Chris O'Donnell, Daniela Ruah, Linda Hunt, Renée Felice Smith, Barrett Foa, LL Cool J and Shane Brennan

NCIS Los Angeles 100th episode cake cutting event

LL Cool J and Linda Hunt - NCIS Los Angeles 100th episode cake cutting event Held At Paramount Studios - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 23rd August 2013

Eric Christian Olsen, R. Scott Gemmill, John Peter Kousakis, Chris O'Donnell, Daniela Ruah, Linda Hunt, Renée Felice Smith, Barrett Foa, LL Cool J and Shane Brennan
Eric Christian Olsen, LL Cool J, Linda Hunt, Barrett Foa, Renée Felice Smith, Daniela Ruah and Chris O'Donnell
Eric Christian Olsen, Chris O'Donnell, Miguel Ferrer, Daniela Ruah, Barrett Foa, LL Cool J, Linda Hunt and Renée Felice Smith
Eric Christian Olsen, Chris O'Donnell, LL Cool J and Linda Hunt
Eric Christian Olsen, Chris O'Donnell, LL Cool J, Linda Hunt, Barrett Foa, Renée Felice Smith and Daniela Ruah

NCIS Los Angeles 100th episode celebration

Linda Hunt - NCIS Los Angeles 100th episode celebration Held At Paramount Studios - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 23rd August 2013

Linda Hunt
Eric Christian Olsen, Chris O'Donnell, LL Cool J, Linda Hunt, Barrett Foa, Renée Felice Smith and Miguel Ferrer
Chris O'Donnell, LL Cool J, Linda Hunt, Barrett Foa and Renée Felice Smith
Eric Christian Olsen, Chris O'Donnell, LL Cool J, Linda Hunt, Barrett Foa, Renée Felice Smith and Daniela Ruah
Eric Christian Olsen, Chris O'Donnell, LL Cool J, Linda Hunt, Barrett Foa, Renée Felice Smith and Miguel Ferrer with Execs

2011 CBS Upfront held at the Lincoln Center

Linda Hunt - LL Cooll J and Linda Hunt New York City, USA - 2011 CBS Upfront held at the Lincoln Center Wednesday 18th May 2011

Linda Hunt

2011 CBS Upfront held at the Lincoln Center

Linda Hunt and LL Cool J - Linda Hunt and LL Cool J New York City, USA - 2011 CBS Upfront held at the Lincoln Center Wednesday 18th May 2011

The Singing Revolution Review


Excellent
When one of the participants in Estonia's bloodless "singing revolution," an affable activist/artist named Heinz Valk, tells the camera that they successfully chased out the Soviets with "a song and a smile," it's a striking moment. Nowhere else could culture, song, and defiance come together so powerfully as they did in the small Baltic nation of Estonia. Revolutions, by and large, are often marked by dramatic upheaval -- fires in the streets, bullets passing overhead, tanks rumbling through cities, bodies, blood, and tears -- they rarely happen in slow, determined waves of peace. And I doubt there have been many successful revolutions, like Estonia's, fought in song.

James and Maureen Castle Tusty's 2006 documentary, The Singing Revolution, is a superb tribute to Estonia's accomplishment. Comprised mostly of archival footage, interspersed with modern interviews, The Singing Revolution not only provides a detailed (though never dull) overview of the revolution but also of Estonian culture.

Continue reading: The Singing Revolution Review

Yours, Mine and Ours (2005) Review


Terrible
Three major studios (Sony, Paramount, and MGM) collaborated on one motion picture, and this is the result? A moronic mingling of massive families, Brady Bunch style, that isn't satisfied until father figure Dennis Quaid is coated in a sticky paste and pummeled into submission? That thinks it's amusing when one child pukes, but hilarious when another child slips in it? That somehow convinces Oscar winner Linda Hunt to attempt a demoralizing joke involving her pink thong? I've long since accepted that Hollywood requires its family comedies to be juvenile, but do they need to be so dumb?

Raja Gosnell's Yours, Mine and Ours is a remake of a mediocre Lucille Ball-Henry Fonda pairing that couldn't be further from the original. This version reunites former sweethearts Frank Beardsley (Quaid) and Helen North (Rene Russo), except now they're widows heading up huge families - he has eight children, she has 10. While attending their high school reunion, the two are pleasantly surprised to find that the feelings they once shared still exist. In the very next scene - which we have to assume occurs the day after the reunion - Frank and Helen are telling their respective broods that they tied the knot, forming one gigantic disaster of a family.

Continue reading: Yours, Mine and Ours (2005) Review

Yours, Mine and Ours Review


Terrible
Three major studios (Sony, Paramount, and MGM) collaborated on one motion picture, and this is the result? A moronic mingling of massive families, Brady Bunch style, that isn't satisfied until father figure Dennis Quaid is coated in a sticky paste and pummeled into submission? That thinks it's amusing when one child pukes, but hilarious when another child slips in it? That somehow convinces Oscar winner Linda Hunt to attempt a demoralizing joke involving her pink thong? I've long since accepted that Hollywood requires its family comedies to be juvenile, but do they need to be so dumb?

Raja Gosnell's Yours, Mine and Ours is a remake of a mediocre Lucille Ball-Henry Fonda pairing that couldn't be further from the original. This version reunites former sweethearts Frank Beardsley (Quaid) and Helen North (Rene Russo), except now they're widows heading up huge families - he has eight children, she has 10. While attending their high school reunion, the two are pleasantly surprised to find that the feelings they once shared still exist. In the very next scene - which we have to assume occurs the day after the reunion - Frank and Helen are telling their respective broods that they tied the knot, forming one gigantic disaster of a family.

Continue reading: Yours, Mine and Ours Review

The Year of Living Dangerously Review


Good
Five bucks if you can remember where and when the heralded Year of Living Dangerously is set. No, not Vietnam or Cambodia. It's actually 1965 Indonesia, when a boring assignment turns "dangerous" for Aussie journalist Guy Hamilton (Mel Gibson) when the country's revolution unexpectedly begins. Soon he's involved with a diplomat (Sigourney Weaver) when not running amok with photographer pal Billy Kwan, a half-Chinese dwarf man -- memorably played by non-Chinese, non-dwarf, non-male Linda Hunt, who deservedly won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar. The rest of the film hasn't aged nearly as well as Hunt's fun performance, though.

Dragonfly Review


Grim
Dragonfly asks us: When someone you love dies... are they gone forever? It also answers by saying: Apparently not -- they haunt you until you go crazy, pummeling you with insects and kooky drawings. My kind of love, baby.

The love in Dragonfly is the wife of poor Joe Darrow (Kevin Costner), an emergency medicine doctor in Chicago. She's also a doctor -- a pediatric oncologist named Emily -- and for some reason, she decides to head for Venezuela to do a little Peace Corps-style work, presumably to exorcise her upper class guilt.

Continue reading: Dragonfly Review

Waiting for the Moon Review


Grim
Well, a rose is a rose is a rose, and a movie is a movie is a snoozefest.

Jill Godmilow's earnest portrait of Gertrude Stein (Linda Bassett) and Alice B. Toklas (Linda Hunt) during their period together at 27 Rue de Fleurus in France is obviously the product of much heartfelt love for the duo. Too bad it's rambling, pedantic, and so overtly misanthropic that one wonders how any viewer could leech out the love within.

Continue reading: Waiting for the Moon Review

Pocahontas Review


Terrible
One of the worst animated films in Disney history, you'll get more genuine history out of a pop-up book than you will in Disney's infamously bad Pocahontas.

In real life, Pocahontas was an Algonquin Indian who is said to have prevented the execution of colonist John Smith in 1607 by her father when she was only 12 years old. Since Smith couldn't speak Powhatan, his interpretation of the events may be mistaken, but it's generally thought today that the story is true. In thanks, Pocahontas was later captured by settlers at Jamestown, taught English, and taken to England where she was celebrated as an "Indian princess" and married off. Before much time could pass, though, she got smallpox (or some other disease) and died at the ripe old age of 23.

Continue reading: Pocahontas Review

Twenty Bucks Review


Good
Check to the right... and that's only part of the cast. Movie stars great and small came out for this production, the ultimate production of a screenplay that's been floating around since the Great Depression -- seriously, it was originally written that long ago.

The story is simple: There's no real plot or central character -- aside from a $20 that makes it way from a random pickup across several days and dozens of handlers. From a homeless woman (Linda Hunt) intent on buying a lottery ticket with it to the G-string of a stripper (Melora Walters) to a pair of thieves (Christopher Lloyd and Steve Buscemi) to many more characters normal and exotic, the bill gets filthier and filthier until its ultimate demise (and rebirth, back in the hands of Hunt's street urchin).

Continue reading: Twenty Bucks Review

Dragonfly Review


Weak

"This could be your 'Sixth Sense,'" someone probably told Kevin Costner when pitching him the concept for the beyond-the-grave chiller "Dragonfly" -- "could" being the operative word. Just how spine-tingling this movie seems will depend entirely on how attune you are to its sometimes heavy-handed foreshadowing.

It wouldn't be fair to give away any of the clues to the movie's conclusion in this review because while, in retrospect, the equation is as simple as 2 + 2, for the better part of the film the formula is obscured by allusionary symbolism that is sometimes quite effective and other times downright obtuse. Figure it out when the director wants you to -- a few minutes before the end, of course -- and you'll get those tingles. Catch on too early to the big red flags and you'll have nothing to do but note the movie's many other shortcomings.

Costner plays Dr. Joe Darrow, an emergency room surgeon whose life is turned upside-down when his saintly pediatrician wife (Susanna Thompson from TV's "Once and Again") is killed in a bus accident while on a humanitarian mission in the jungles of Venezuela.

Continue reading: Dragonfly Review

Linda Hunt

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