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Lily Tomlin, Helen Reddy and Jane Fonda seen at the Women's March in L.A, held at Downtown Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 21st January 2017

Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin, Helen Reddy and Jane Fonda
Lily Tomlin, Helen Reddy and Jane Fonda

Lily Tomlin on stage at the 50th annual CMA (Country Music Association) Awards held at Music City Center in Nashville, Tennessee, United States - Wednesday 2nd November 2016

Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin

Lily Tomlin seen on the red carpet at the 68th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards held at the Microsoft Theater Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 19th September 2016

Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin

Lily Tomlin seen on the red carpet at the 68th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards held at the Microsoft Theater Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 19th September 2016

Lily Tomlin

Lily Tomlin To Receive SAG Life Achievement Award


Lily Tomlin

Lily Tomlin is to become the 53rd recipient of the prestigious Life Achievement Award at the 23rd Screen Actors Guild Awards. The six-time Emmy winner and star of Netflix’s ‘Grace and Frankie’ will be celebrated for her career in movies and television, which has spanned over 40 years.

Lily TomlinLily Tomlin will receive the SAG Life Achievement Award

Announcing Tomlin as this year’s recipient, SAG-AFTRA president Gabrielle Carteris said: "Lily Tomlin is an extraordinary actress, as equally adept at narrative drama as in comedy roles. But it is through her many original characters that Lily's creative genius fully shines.”

Continue reading: Lily Tomlin To Receive SAG Life Achievement Award

Lily Tomlin - Television Academy's 70th Anniversary Gala - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 2nd June 2016

Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin

Jane Fonda , Lily Tomlin - 3rd Biennial Rebels With A Cause Fundraiser at Barker Hangar - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 11th May 2016

Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin
Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin
Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin

Lily Tomlin - 53rd Annual ICG Publicists Awards at the Beverly Hills Hotel - Arrivals at Beverly Hilton - Beverly Hills, CA, Beverly Hills Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 26th February 2016

Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin

Lily Tomlin - 17th Annual Women's Image Awards at Royce Hall - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 10th February 2016

Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin

Lily Tomlin - 17th Annual Women's Image Awards at Royce Hall - Arrivals at Royce Hall - Westwood, California, United States - Wednesday 10th February 2016

Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin

Lily Tomlin - AARP's 15th Annual Movies For GrownUps Awards held at the Beverly Wilshire Four Seasons Hotel - Arrivals at Beverly Wilshire Hotel, Beverly Hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 8th February 2016

Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin

Grandma Review

Excellent

The fabulous Lily Tomlin finally gets the lead role she deserves in this smart, engaging comedy-drama. Like her title character, the film itself refuses to play nice, tackling big issues like abortion and the strain between mothers and daughters without ever simplifying the topics or the people involved. The plot may feel a bit contrived, and the entire movie rather lightweight, but it's thoroughly entertaining. And the subtle approach to the big themes gives it a strong kick.

Tomlin plays Elle, a mature woman who has just broken up with her girlfriend Olivia (Judy Greer) for no real reason. Then her young granddaughter Sage (Julia Garner) turns up asking for money to terminate her pregnancy. Elle doesn't have the cash, but offers to help her find it, so they head off into Los Angeles in her rattling 1955 Dodge, visiting the unborn baby's stoner father (Nat Wolff) and some of Elle's colourful old friends (Elizabeth Pena, Laverne Cox and Sam Elliott). But both Elle and Sage are terrified that they might ultimately need to get in contact with Sage's workaholic mother Judy (Marcia Gay Harden), the daughter Elle never knew how to talk to.

The layers of mother-daughter interaction in this film are fascinating, and played with riotously jagged chemistry by the gifted cast. Tomlin punches every witty one-liner perfectly, capturing Elle's life-loving spirit and also her weary exhaustion at the way the world keeps changing around her. Tomlin finds terrific angles in each of Elle's relationships, drawing out Garner's wide-eyed yearning, Greer's steeliness and Harden's professional bluster. Each of the side roles feels like a fully formed person with a life of his or her own, which gives context to the humour and makes the entire film feel more weighty and meaningful.

Continue reading: Grandma Review

How Did Miley Cyrus Ensure Netflix Gave 'Grace And Frankie' A Second Season?


Miley Cyrus Netflix Jane Fonda Lily Tomlin

Netflix has just given the green light to a second season of comedy 'Grace and Frankie', starring Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin. The series premiered earlier this month on the streaming service and earned positive reviews from the critics. But earlier this week something much more important than a few star ratings happened, as mega-famous singer Miley Cyrus came out as a fan of the show.

Cyrus became a big fan of ‘Grace and Frankie’ over Memorial Day weekend.

“I found my show! #GraceandFrankie on a bender! Jane & Lily are so bad a$$!” the singer told her Twitter followers on Monday, in tweet which has so far been shared over 2,500 times and favourited by 5,000 users.

Continue reading: How Did Miley Cyrus Ensure Netflix Gave 'Grace And Frankie' A Second Season?

Admission Trailer


Portia Nathan is a prim and proper admissions officer for the prestigious Princeton University and finds herself living a consistent, routine life with rules and specifications that she is uncomfortable to veer from. During a visit to recruit possible admissions to the college, she calls at a rather unconventional countryside high school headed by John Pressman, a classmate of hers that she met when she was in college. While he is determined to steer Portia towards some rather gifted students of his, he also wants to introduce her to a boy named Jeremiah who he believes is a prodigy and also the he was the child that she gave up for adoption after an unplanned pregnancy in college. John and Portia find themselves falling for each other and while John is happy to let things take their course, Portia is adverse to the idea of romance but she soon finds her life moving towards the kind of happiness she never knew she could have while at the same time doing everything in her power to get her biological son to college - even if that means breaking rules to do so.

'Admission' is a wonderfully heart-warming romantic comedy directed by comedy genius Paul Weitz ('About a Boy', 'American Pie', 'Little Fockers') and written by Karen Croner ('One True Thing', 'Cold Sassy Tree') and novelist Jean Hanff Korelitz in her screenwriting debut. It is set for release on March 8th 2013.

Starring: Tina Fey, Paul Rudd, Michael Sheen, Wallace Shawn, Gloria Reuben, Nat Wolff, Lily Tomlin,

Continue: Admission Trailer

Ponyo Review


Very Good
As with Spirited Away and Howl's Moving Castle, Miyazaki takes us on a strange flight of fantasy with this adventure centred around two young children. While it continually stimulates our imagination, it's a little too odd to really resonate.

Sosuke (voiced by Jonas) is a 5-year-old living in a cliff-top house with his frazzled mother (Fey) while his fisherman dad (Damon) spends most of his time at sea. One day, Sosuke finds a strange little fish named Ponyo (Cyrus). What he doesn't know is that Ponyo's the daughter of the Mother of the Sea (Blanchett) and the keeper of balance (Neeson), and that Ponyo is using her powers to become human. Actually, Ponyo doesn't seem very aware of this either, but whatever she's doing is throwing nature out of balance.

Continue reading: Ponyo Review

The Walker Review


Good
There are several things being chatted and whispered about in the backrooms, parlors and bars of Paul Shrader's Washington but nothing distinctive. The closest to a controversy comes when a few specific so-and-sos ruminate about a possible conspiracy involving the vice president and a dead escort. These events, however, doesn't seem to matter much in the grand scheme of things, and that is both a good thing and a bad thing in Shrader's latest film, The Walker.

As is explained by a pair of FBI agents, a walker is the title given to men who escort women of great importance (and elderly age) from here to there in the ladies' leisurely days of lunching and shopping. Like other men in his profession, Carter Page III (Woody Harrelson) has the breeding and education that the career demands and his taste in fashion and furniture is impeccable; he's also a flagrant homosexual. He shuttles away from his one-day-a-week job as a real estate insider to meet up with the likes of Lynn Locklear (Kristin Scott Thomas), the wife of a senator, and Abigail Delorean (Lily Tomlin), the wife of Washington's most powerful fixer (Ned Beatty).

Continue reading: The Walker Review

The West Wing: Season Six Review


Good
The death of veteran actor John Spencer -- who played Chief of Staff Leo McGarry, the coolest head among the cast of The West Wing -- was sad news, and it was the final death knell for the once-popular NBC series, now finishing its seventh and final season. That's a shame, because in some ways the show is still getting better.

When creator Aaron Sorkin left The West Wing abruptly in 2003, many people wrote the show off. Sorkin imbued the show with his naïve left-liberal bias and scripted much of its glib dialogue, and his leaving seemed to guarantee an identity crisis. In fact, The West Wing was really nothing more than Sorkin's personal wish fulfillment: What if we elected a strongly moral liberal Democrat as president? Or to put it a different way, what if President Clinton (who was still president when the show started, in 1999) had been even more liberal, and not horny all the time? Sorkin's answer was Jed Bartlet, the imaginary president played by Martin Sheen. Bartlet is sort of a Ted Kennedy with gravitas -- a sententious, northeastern liberal Catholic who, because this is TV, is always right. (With John Kerry we actually had a chance to elect someone like Bartlet, minus the intellectual rigor, and not too surprisingly, the electorate didn't go nuts over him. Of course, Kerry was not as telegenic as Martin Sheen.)

Continue reading: The West Wing: Season Six Review

A Prairie Home Companion Review


Very Good
Even among NPR fans - already a rather specific group - there is somewhat of a rift when it comes to the weekly program, A Prairie Home Companion. It's the sort of corny jokes and quaint folk singing that went out of fashion a half-century ago, and to listeners it can be a soothing throwback -- unbearably, cloyingly sweet -- or, to folks who drink Tab cola and wear Reading Rainbow screen-print tees, so uncool it's hip.The film of the same name is really just a barely fictionalized version of the radio show - the content is the same, the gentle, homey sensibility certainly is the same; the only real difference is the parts are played by superstar talent. So it has precisely the same appeal and built-in fans of the program. Fans of director Robert Altman will be most pleased. If you aren't a follower already, well, there is precisely nothing here to win you over. It's A Mighty Wind without the irony.Despite decades of popularity, it's the end of the road for A Prairie Home Companion, because the radio station was sold to a Texas corporation (undoubtedly one in the oil business) that sent someone north to fire the cast and raze the theatre. Flitting between onstage and off are the cast and crew, now abuzz at the thought of a looming axe: a pair of floopy, scattered singing sisters; two ribald cowpokes; a stage manager harried by the performers' eccentricities; a tritely rebellious teenager; a weepy sandwich lady and her lover; a blonde in a white trench coat acting as a ham-fisted filmic device; and a house detective so trapped in the dames-and-private dick era that he's named Guy Noir. At the center of it all is Garrison Keillor, playing himself as the unflappable, vaguely bewildered host of the program.The manic energy, overlapping scenes, and meandering (and often unresolved) storylines are all Altman trademarks, to be sure, but as scripted by Keillor, they all fit in nicely with this cozy brand of Americana. Also, the setting falls in with Altman's affinity for setting films amid the controlled chaos that goes into creating art, which has led him to making some masterpieces (The Player) and some majestic flops (Ready to Wear). Companion, it must be said, is neither.It does hop with rapid-fire wit, and the cast is enviable, if occasionally baffling. The standouts are hardly surprising - Meryl Streep and Lily Tomlin are charming as the flighty Johnson sisters; Kevin Kline embraces anachronism as the hapless Noir; and though it seems unfair to commend him for playing himself, Keillor is a delightful center to the storm. And though she may appear incongruous on the list of heavy-hitters and accomplished character players, Lindsay Lohan, playing Streep's sulky daughter, is either quite sweet or not intolerable, depending on how tired you are of her tabloid persona.The missteps are unmistakable, though, glaring despite the frantic pace and mishmash of characters and stories. Plot points are picked up and promptly dropped, which is simply ambiance when it is a running joke about how Keillor got into radio, but feels inappropriate when it is the death of one of the show's regulars. Including a luminescent angel of death worked well in All That Jazz, but here, poor Virginia Madsen is saddled with a clunky, useless, monotone role that is utterly pointless. And the unevenness of the Noir character is aggressively irritating - fart humor and slapstick who's-on-first routines? Really? That's beneath this film, or it should be.Perhaps the stylings of Keillor and Altman are oddly too well-suited. For rabid Companion fans - and perhaps avid Altman followers as well - the film is like watching something you have seen and loved a hundred times already, but in some new way. If you are outside the built-in audience, however, the entire film is an inside joke: someone can explain it to you, but it will never be as fun as if you just... got it.Can I get an Amen?

The West Wing: Sixth Season Review


Good
The death of veteran actor John Spencer -- who played Chief of Staff Leo McGarry, the coolest head among the cast of The West Wing -- was sad news, and it was the final death knell for the once-popular NBC series, now finishing its seventh and final season. That's a shame, because in some ways the show is still getting better.

When creator Aaron Sorkin left The West Wing abruptly in 2003, many people wrote the show off. Sorkin imbued the show with his naïve left-liberal bias and scripted much of its glib dialogue, and his leaving seemed to guarantee an identity crisis. In fact, The West Wing was really nothing more than Sorkin's personal wish fulfillment: What if we elected a strongly moral liberal Democrat as president? Or to put it a different way, what if President Clinton (who was still president when the show started, in 1999) had been even more liberal, and not horny all the time? Sorkin's answer was Jed Bartlet, the imaginary president played by Martin Sheen. Bartlet is sort of a Ted Kennedy with gravitas -- a sententious, northeastern liberal Catholic who, because this is TV, is always right. (With John Kerry we actually had a chance to elect someone like Bartlet, minus the intellectual rigor, and not too surprisingly, the electorate didn't go nuts over him. Of course, Kerry was not as telegenic as Martin Sheen.)

Continue reading: The West Wing: Sixth Season Review

Short Cuts Review


Very Good
While one could argue that Robert Altman's 1993 film Short Cuts was simply an updating of his 1975 classic Nashville, with a much higher quotient of star power and slightly more prurient subject matter - an attempt to keep the once iconic filmmaker from straying into the shadowy irrelevance like so many of his '70s peers - and while that argument could very well be true, that doesn't deprive Short Cuts of any of its power, or disprove the fact that it's ultimately a better film.

Spinning together a series of short stories from the master of the form, Raymond Carver, Altman takes some 20-odd Los Angelenos and twists their lives together seemingly just for the fun of how their individual little lives play out and connect up, like a puppetmaster who can't stop adding new puppets to his repertoire. To flesh out his tapestry of early '90s Southern California life, Altman has a fine batch of actors and actresses, including everyone from the best of their generation (Jennifer Jason Leigh, Robert Downey Jr) to the solidly respectable but not terribly exciting choices (Julianne Moore, Matthew Modine, Madeleine Stowe) to oddly effective musician stunt casting (Lyle Lovett, Tom Waits, Huey Lewis) to one lordly presence (Jack Lemmon).

Continue reading: Short Cuts Review

I Heart Huckabees Review


Very Good
In David O. Russell's I Heart Huckabees, everyone talks a little bit like they're in a play -- the dialogue is unusually dense and abstract for a film, even an artsy one, even an "existential comedy," as this one purports to be. Huckabees is like a screwball comedy filtered through a student thesis project, but it's nothing if not original.

Five years have passed since Russell's crowning achievement so far, the Gulf War comedy-drama Three Kings, and the ensemble cast for his new film suggests he's spent a lot of that time collecting even more talent to act out his socio-comedic semi-political statements. Jason Schwartzman leads as Albert, a young environmental activist suffering a professional and personal meltdown, as his "coalition" is invaded by smarmy account executive Brad Stand (Jude Law) from the Wal-Mart-like chain store Huckabees (Albert wants to save a local marsh; Stand has his eye on good PR for his company). Albert hires the Jaffees, a pair of "existential detectives" (Lily Tomlin and Dustin Hoffman) to help solve the "case" of his messy life. Half private investigator and half new-age therapist, Tomlin commences the investigation by asking, "Have you ever transcended space and time?"

Continue reading: I Heart Huckabees Review

Tea With Mussolini Review


Excellent
When I walked into the theater to see this film, I thought to myself, "Why am I seeing this movie? I have no interest in seeing it and I won't like it." Surly enough during the first ten minutes of the film, my preconceived notion was correct. It was a 'chick flick', case closed. But then the movie turned and started to appeal to me. I was really getting into it, and really absorbing the true story it was unfolding.

Tea with Mussolini focuses on the life of a boy named Luca, who is director Franco Zefferelli's alter ego. In Florence 1935, young Luca's mother is dead, and he is an orphan. Although Lucas wealthy father lives near by, he has no time for children. The father's English secretary Mary Wallace (Joan Plowright) sees the unjust way Luca is being raised in the orphanage. As a result she takes him in. Along with Mary's group of English tea time friends known as The Scorpioni, Luca is taught many things. He learns to appreciate art through the nutty, yet lovable artist Arabella (Dame Judi Dench). He learns of Shakespeare and culture from his guardian Mary, and learns how to behave as a gentleman through the other members of The Scorpioni.

Continue reading: Tea With Mussolini Review

Get Bruce Review


Good
Bette, Billy, Lili, Whoopi -- now I know why these people aren't funny: Because Bruce Vilanch writes all their material. And now they've written a song about how great he is... ick.

Continue reading: Get Bruce Review

Picking Up The Pieces Review


Bad
Normally, I'd say any movie that features Woody Allen as a homocidal maniac is okay in my book, if only Picking Up the Pieces didn't bore you to tears en route to the funny stuff, which consists solely of Allen's spare one-liners. The plot, involving a New Mexico community that rallies around Allen's dead wife's severed hand thanks to its miracle-granting powers, shows a ton of promise, but never delivers. Note to Alfonso Arau: more boobs.

Nine To Five Review


Very Good
Strangely enough, I just realized after seeing this film again today (1999) that Teaching Mrs. Tingle is a crude rip-off of this movie (three women take boss hostage at his own home to teach him a lesson). Who'd a thunk!?

Orange County Review


Very Good
Forget She's All That and its brethren. Back in the 1980s, the maestro of teen films -- John Hughes (The Breakfast Club, Sixteen Candles) -- taught us to produce films in the finicky teen-comedy genre. His simple rule -- a single motivation is required for all main characters: lots and lots of angst. Just create a simple story of teenagers yearning to escape the downtrodden existence of childhood and the microcosm of high school, and success is surely guaranteed.

Life has been good for Shaun Brumder (Colin Hanks) in simple Orange County, California. He's a good kid with a love of catching waves, a sweet girlfriend, and despite his eccentric family, life is always like riding six-foot waves that curl for days. After a freak surfing accident drowns one of his best buds one summer, Shaun begins to reassess his life and inspiration strikes one day in the form of a novel by Marcus Skinner. He decides to become a writer, trades in his surfboard, improves his grades, and waits for his acceptance letter from Stanford College to study under his new idol Skinner. But when Stanford rejects him due to a guidance counselor's mistake, Shaun only has 24 hours to fix the problem and get the hell out of O.C. to follow his dreams and work out the angst.

Continue reading: Orange County Review

Flirting With Disaster Review


Excellent
You know, I was in a real downer of a mood when I went to see Flirting With Disaster, but, incredibly, the raw comedy of this film could only cheer me up. And I thought I was a cynic....

The sophomore effort of writer/director David O. Russell (whose first film, Spanking the Monkey, was a real jaw-dropper by virtue of its title alone) is a comedy/romance that somehow captures the feel of both a home movie and an acid trip together. On the surface, the story of Mel Coplin (Ben Stiller) and his search for his birth parents is a tried-and-true tale. In reality, Flirting With Disaster has more twists than a French braid and as much comedy as, well, as much brash and uncompromising comedy as anything else has given us this year.

Continue reading: Flirting With Disaster Review

I ? Huckabees Review


Good

The one philosophy behind the existential screwball comedy "I ? Huckabees" (pronounce the ? as "heart") is that there is no one philosophy. A satire of spiritual gurus, self-help and other psychological gimmickry, it makes its point by being so esoteric and cerebrally akimbo that it will likely divide audiences between those who find its deliberately abstruse discombobulation amusing and to the point, and those who find it just abstruse and discombobulated.

Written and directed by David O. Russell, the observant and darkly comical wit behind the Gulf War derision "Three Kings," the ensemble storyline whirlpools around Albert Markovski (Jason Schwartzman), an unhinged and obsessive young environmentalist who has seen the open-space preservation group he chartered slip through his fingers and into the hands of a snake-oil-charming corporate stooge named Brad Stand (Jude Law). Brad is, in fact, an executive at Huckabees -- a slick, corporate retailer with a habit of moving into small towns and building megastores where there had once been open space.

With his failure causing him to question his whole life, Albert seeks metaphysical peace of mind from Bernard and Vivian Jaffe (Dustin Hoffman and Lily Tomlin), a pair of unconventional, off-kilter and out-of-sync private eyes who specialize in solving the mysteries of their clients' inner turmoil. Soon they are, quite conspicuously, following Albert to work, peering through his windows, digging through his trash, and pairing him up with another lost soul as a partner in intellectual recovery -- Tommy (Mark Wahlberg), a blue-collar lug of a firefighter whose eye-opening visit inside his own head has rapidly become a slide into bemused Nihilism.

Continue reading: I ? Huckabees Review

Orange County Review


Good

Somewhere inside the surprisingly fresh, sharply jocular, angst-of-youth comedy "Orange County" there's a trite, typical teen movie struggling to get out. But director Jake Kasden just keeps out-witting the monster, pulling the carpet out from under its inherent clichés and giving his characters the chance to breathe and break free of their stock moldings.

A screwball affair about a bookwormy high school beach bum from the SoCal 'burbs who thinks his life is over when he doesn't get into Stanford, this flick rises above the spiritless, increasingly insipid, cookie-cutter teen genre simply because Kasden ("Zero Effect") and screenwriter Mike White ("Chuck and Buck") cared enough to try a little harder.

Played with pitch-perfect Everykid exasperation by sublimely expressive string bean Colin Hanks (son of Tom), Shaun Brumder had his heart set on pursuing his literary aspirations under the tutelage of his favorite writer, a professor at the venerated campus. So when he finds out his rejection was the fault of an inept guidance counselor (Lily Tomlin -- in the first of several inspired cameo performances) who sent the wrong transcript, Shaun goes on a dogged mission to get the decision reconsidered.

Continue reading: Orange County Review

The Kid Review


OK

Disney sure lays it on thick in "The Kid," a feel-good family flick starring Bruce Willis as a snide, fundamentally unhappy L.A. "image consultant" who meets himself as an 8-year-old boy and learns to embrace his inner child.

The incidental music sounds like the soundtrack from "E.T." crossed with a "Teletubbies" song. Willis -- more determined than ever to avoid being pigeon-holed -- spends a good third of the movie looking wistful or misty. The Kid himself (roly-poly, and yes, adorable newcomer Spencer Breslin) isn't a terribly good actor, but boy has he mastered the art of the wide-eyed double-take. It's enough to send a cynical, grown-up movie critic into sugar shock.

But while I have no trouble pointing out everywhere this rather slight movies is flawed -- and its flaws are significant -- I can also admit when I've had a good time at the movies. And "The Kid" made me smile like, well, a kid.

Continue reading: The Kid Review

Lily Tomlin

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Lily Tomlin Movies

Grandma Movie Review

Grandma Movie Review

The fabulous Lily Tomlin finally gets the lead role she deserves in this smart, engaging...

Grandma Trailer

Grandma Trailer

Elle Reid may be tough, but she's struggling coping with a recent break-up with her...

Grandma - Clip Trailer

Grandma - Clip Trailer

Elle Reid is an ageing poet recovering from a broken heart following her break-up with...

Altman Movie Review

Altman Movie Review

This isn't a tell-all doc about the iconic filmmaker: it's a love letter from his...

Admission Movie Review

Admission Movie Review

We generally expect more wacky humour from Fey and Rudd than this comedy, which is...

Admission Trailer

Admission Trailer

Portia Nathan is a prim and proper admissions officer for the prestigious Princeton University and...

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A Prairie Home Companion Movie Review

A Prairie Home Companion Movie Review

Even among NPR fans - already a rather specific group - there is somewhat of...

I Heart Huckabees Movie Review

I Heart Huckabees Movie Review

In David O. Russell's I Heart Huckabees, everyone talks a little bit like they're in...

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