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How Did Miley Cyrus Ensure Netflix Gave 'Grace and Frankie' A Second Season?


Miley Cyrus Netflix Jane Fonda Lily Tomlin

Netflix has just given the green light to a second season of comedy 'Grace and Frankie', starring Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin. The series premiered earlier this month on the streaming service and earned positive reviews from the critics. But earlier this week something much more important than a few star ratings happened, as mega-famous singer Miley Cyrus came out as a fan of the show.

Cyrus became a big fan of ‘Grace and Frankie’ over Memorial Day weekend.

“I found my show! #GraceandFrankie on a bender! Jane & Lily are so bad a$$!” the singer told her Twitter followers on Monday, in tweet which has so far been shared over 2,500 times and favourited by 5,000 users.

Continue reading: How Did Miley Cyrus Ensure Netflix Gave 'Grace and Frankie' A Second Season?

Netflix hosts the premiere of the new original series 'Grace and Frankie

Lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda - Netflix hosts the premiere of the new original series 'Grace and Frankie' - Arrivals at Regal LA LIVE - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 29th April 2015

Lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda
Lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda

Premiere Of Netflix's 'Grace And Frankie'

Lily Tomlin - A variety of stars were snapped as they attended the Premiere Of Netflix's 'Grace And Frankie' which was held at Regal Cinemas L.A. Live in Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 29th April 2015

Ethan Embry, June Diane Raphael, Lily Tomlin, Jane Fonda and Sam Waterston
Ethan Embry, June Diane Raphael, Lily Tomlin, Jane Fonda and Sam Waterston
Ethan Embry, June Diane Raphael, Lily Tomlin, Jane Fonda and Sam Waterston
Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin
Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin

Altman Review


Excellent

This isn't a tell-all doc about the iconic filmmaker: it's a love letter from his friends and family. With a terrific range of film clips, home movies, behind-the-scenes footage and never-seen stills, this movie explores how Robert Altman's work has forever changed the way Hollywood makes movies, simply because his inventive filmmaking style forced everyone else to try and keep up.

After getting his start directing industrial films in Kansas City, Altman made the jump to Hollywood in the late 1950s, annoying a range of studio executives with his preference for naturalistic, overlapping dialogue in television programmes. Then he made the jump to cinema and took the world by storm with M.A.S.H. In 1970, winning the Palme d'Or at Cannes and introducing the "Altmanesque" combination of earthy interaction, ensemble casts and political subtext. In his documentary, filmmaker Ron Mann cleverly asks many of Altman's actors to define the word Altmanesque, not as it relates to the movies but as it relates to the man himself.

Altman was a rare filmmaker who was loved by his casts and crews as well as the critics. Notoriously picky film journalist Pauline Kael famously wrote that "he can make film fireworks out of next to nothing", and this documentary demonstrates this with clips and backstage moments from his classics, ranging from McCabe and Mrs. Miller (1971), Buffalo Bill and the Indians (1976) and Popeye (1980) to The Player (1992), Short Cuts (1993) and Gosford Park (2001). The film's focus is on his movies, although it's narrated through personal interviews with Altman and his widow Kathryn Reed and features some superb footage of his sons. It also traces his ongoing health issues, from his heart transplant to his death from leukaemia in 2006. But there's little mention of his lifelong anti-war efforts or his controversial efforts to legalise marijuana.

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Actors and Others for Animals - Arrivals

Lily Tomlin - Actors and Others for Animals - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 14th October 2014

Lily Tomlin

The Rape Foundation's 2014 brunch - Arrivals

Lily Tomlin - A variety of stars arrived at The Rape Foundation's 2014 brunch which was held at Greenacres in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 28th September 2014

Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin

Tom Hanks Gets Top American Honour For His Extensive Acting Catalogue


Tom Hanks Al Green Sting Lily Tomlin

Tom Hanks is a mammoth actor who has delighted fans with extraordinary performances for just short of 40 years. He started his career by providing us with some delightfully 80s classics in the era of big hair and bright colours with greats such as Splash, Big and Turner & Hooch. In the 90s he gave us a cacophony of feel-good flicks including Sleepless in Seattle, Forrest Gump and the first of one of the most successful trilogies of all time, Toy Story.

Tom Hanks
Tom Hanks' illustrious career is being recognised at the Kennedy Center Honors

In the noughties Hanks got his serious side out and audiences were treated to Road to Perdition, The Da Vinci Code and its sequel Angels and Demons. Sheriff Woody came out in style twice more for Toy Story 2 and 3 and Hanks has been at the helm of some of the best films of the past few years as a main star in Captain Phillips and Saving Mr Banks.

Continue reading: Tom Hanks Gets Top American Honour For His Extensive Acting Catalogue

Netflix Orders Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin Sitcom, 'Grace And Frankie'


Jane Fonda Lily Tomlin

Netflix has placed a straight to series, 13-episode order of new comedy show Grace and Frankie, which will star Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin. The half hour-long, single camera episodes will help flesh out the online streaming subscription service's originals line-up, joining the likes of Arrested Development, House of Cards and Orange is the New Black.

Jane Fonda
Jane Fonda Will Star In New Netflix Comedy, 'Grace And Frankie.'

Set to premiere in summer 2015, the show will reunite the stars of the 1980 feature hit 9 to 5 who will play two longtime rivals who are brought together when their husbands decide to run off together to get married. "The women find their lives both turned upside down and to their dismay, permanently intertwined. Eventually, to their surprise, they find they have each other," states Netflix, via LA Times.

Continue reading: Netflix Orders Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin Sitcom, 'Grace And Frankie'

Lily Tomlin Marries Girlfriend Collaborator Jane Wagner After 42 Years Together


Lily Tomlin

Lily Tomlin has finally tied the knot.

The 74 year-old has married her partner Jane Wagner after courting for 42 years.

Their private ceremony took place on New Year's Eve in Los Angeles, Claif., on Tuesday December 31st, Us Weekly reports.

Continue reading: Lily Tomlin Marries Girlfriend Collaborator Jane Wagner After 42 Years Together

Kat Kramer's Films That Change The World" Presents Fallout 5th Anniversary "Think-Tank" And U.S. Premiere

Lily Tomlin - Kat Kramer's Films That Change The World" Presents Fallout 5th Anniversary "Think-Tank" And U.S. Premiere - Hollywood, California, United States - Thursday 14th November 2013

Admission Review


Good

We generally expect more wacky humour from Fey and Rudd than this comedy, which is packed with perhaps too-smart dialog and a lot of warm sentiment. It's an odd mix, looking for jokes in gender roles and higher education, while also finding dramatic and romantic moments along the way. But in the end, the engaging actors make it worth a look.

Fey plays Portia, an admissions officer at the prestigious Princeton University, who's in competition with her office rival (Reuben) for a big promotion as their boss (Shawn) gets ready to retire. Unhelpfully, Portia's long-term boyfriend (Sheen) chooses this moment to leave her. Diving into her job, she visits a progressive high school where the director John (Rudd) is trying a bit too hard to get her to consider unconventionally gifted student Jeremiah (Wolff) for admission to Princeton. Then John tells Portia that he thinks Jeremiah is the son she gave up for adoption 18 years earlier. Meanwhile, Portia's aggressive feminist mother (the superb Tomlin) brings up even more past issues she's never quite dealt with.

The way the screenplay piles all of this on Portia at the same time is more than a little contrived, but Fey juggles it effortlessly, throwing hilariously intelligent one-liners around even in the more intensely serious scenes. Opposite her, Rudd is more understated than usual, and also creates a strongly defined character as a rootless wanderer who just wants to help make the world a better place, but needs to pay more attention to his adopted Ugandan son (Spears). Yes, screenwriter Kroner throws in every variety of parent-child issues too.

Continue reading: Admission Review

Ponyo Review


Good
As with Spirited Away and Howl's Moving Castle, Miyazaki takes us on a strange flight of fantasy with this adventure centred around two young children. While it continually stimulates our imagination, it's a little too odd to really resonate.

Sosuke (voiced by Jonas) is a 5-year-old living in a cliff-top house with his frazzled mother (Fey) while his fisherman dad (Damon) spends most of his time at sea. One day, Sosuke finds a strange little fish named Ponyo (Cyrus). What he doesn't know is that Ponyo's the daughter of the Mother of the Sea (Blanchett) and the keeper of balance (Neeson), and that Ponyo is using her powers to become human. Actually, Ponyo doesn't seem very aware of this either, but whatever she's doing is throwing nature out of balance.

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The Walker Review


OK
There are several things being chatted and whispered about in the backrooms, parlors and bars of Paul Shrader's Washington but nothing distinctive. The closest to a controversy comes when a few specific so-and-sos ruminate about a possible conspiracy involving the vice president and a dead escort. These events, however, doesn't seem to matter much in the grand scheme of things, and that is both a good thing and a bad thing in Shrader's latest film, The Walker.

As is explained by a pair of FBI agents, a walker is the title given to men who escort women of great importance (and elderly age) from here to there in the ladies' leisurely days of lunching and shopping. Like other men in his profession, Carter Page III (Woody Harrelson) has the breeding and education that the career demands and his taste in fashion and furniture is impeccable; he's also a flagrant homosexual. He shuttles away from his one-day-a-week job as a real estate insider to meet up with the likes of Lynn Locklear (Kristin Scott Thomas), the wife of a senator, and Abigail Delorean (Lily Tomlin), the wife of Washington's most powerful fixer (Ned Beatty).

Continue reading: The Walker Review

The West Wing: Season Six Review


OK
The death of veteran actor John Spencer -- who played Chief of Staff Leo McGarry, the coolest head among the cast of The West Wing -- was sad news, and it was the final death knell for the once-popular NBC series, now finishing its seventh and final season. That's a shame, because in some ways the show is still getting better.

When creator Aaron Sorkin left The West Wing abruptly in 2003, many people wrote the show off. Sorkin imbued the show with his naïve left-liberal bias and scripted much of its glib dialogue, and his leaving seemed to guarantee an identity crisis. In fact, The West Wing was really nothing more than Sorkin's personal wish fulfillment: What if we elected a strongly moral liberal Democrat as president? Or to put it a different way, what if President Clinton (who was still president when the show started, in 1999) had been even more liberal, and not horny all the time? Sorkin's answer was Jed Bartlet, the imaginary president played by Martin Sheen. Bartlet is sort of a Ted Kennedy with gravitas -- a sententious, northeastern liberal Catholic who, because this is TV, is always right. (With John Kerry we actually had a chance to elect someone like Bartlet, minus the intellectual rigor, and not too surprisingly, the electorate didn't go nuts over him. Of course, Kerry was not as telegenic as Martin Sheen.)

Continue reading: The West Wing: Season Six Review

A Prairie Home Companion Review


Good
Even among NPR fans - already a rather specific group - there is somewhat of a rift when it comes to the weekly program, A Prairie Home Companion. It's the sort of corny jokes and quaint folk singing that went out of fashion a half-century ago, and to listeners it can be a soothing throwback -- unbearably, cloyingly sweet -- or, to folks who drink Tab cola and wear Reading Rainbow screen-print tees, so uncool it's hip.The film of the same name is really just a barely fictionalized version of the radio show - the content is the same, the gentle, homey sensibility certainly is the same; the only real difference is the parts are played by superstar talent. So it has precisely the same appeal and built-in fans of the program. Fans of director Robert Altman will be most pleased. If you aren't a follower already, well, there is precisely nothing here to win you over. It's A Mighty Wind without the irony.Despite decades of popularity, it's the end of the road for A Prairie Home Companion, because the radio station was sold to a Texas corporation (undoubtedly one in the oil business) that sent someone north to fire the cast and raze the theatre. Flitting between onstage and off are the cast and crew, now abuzz at the thought of a looming axe: a pair of floopy, scattered singing sisters; two ribald cowpokes; a stage manager harried by the performers' eccentricities; a tritely rebellious teenager; a weepy sandwich lady and her lover; a blonde in a white trench coat acting as a ham-fisted filmic device; and a house detective so trapped in the dames-and-private dick era that he's named Guy Noir. At the center of it all is Garrison Keillor, playing himself as the unflappable, vaguely bewildered host of the program.The manic energy, overlapping scenes, and meandering (and often unresolved) storylines are all Altman trademarks, to be sure, but as scripted by Keillor, they all fit in nicely with this cozy brand of Americana. Also, the setting falls in with Altman's affinity for setting films amid the controlled chaos that goes into creating art, which has led him to making some masterpieces (The Player) and some majestic flops (Ready to Wear). Companion, it must be said, is neither.It does hop with rapid-fire wit, and the cast is enviable, if occasionally baffling. The standouts are hardly surprising - Meryl Streep and Lily Tomlin are charming as the flighty Johnson sisters; Kevin Kline embraces anachronism as the hapless Noir; and though it seems unfair to commend him for playing himself, Keillor is a delightful center to the storm. And though she may appear incongruous on the list of heavy-hitters and accomplished character players, Lindsay Lohan, playing Streep's sulky daughter, is either quite sweet or not intolerable, depending on how tired you are of her tabloid persona.The missteps are unmistakable, though, glaring despite the frantic pace and mishmash of characters and stories. Plot points are picked up and promptly dropped, which is simply ambiance when it is a running joke about how Keillor got into radio, but feels inappropriate when it is the death of one of the show's regulars. Including a luminescent angel of death worked well in All That Jazz, but here, poor Virginia Madsen is saddled with a clunky, useless, monotone role that is utterly pointless. And the unevenness of the Noir character is aggressively irritating - fart humor and slapstick who's-on-first routines? Really? That's beneath this film, or it should be.Perhaps the stylings of Keillor and Altman are oddly too well-suited. For rabid Companion fans - and perhaps avid Altman followers as well - the film is like watching something you have seen and loved a hundred times already, but in some new way. If you are outside the built-in audience, however, the entire film is an inside joke: someone can explain it to you, but it will never be as fun as if you just... got it.Can I get an Amen?
Lily Tomlin

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