Levon Helm

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Outside Ed Sullivan Theatre For The 'Late Show With David Letterman'

Levon Helm, David Letterman and Ed Sullivan Theatre Sunday 19th July 2009 outside Ed Sullivan Theatre for the 'Late Show With David Letterman' New York City, USA

Levon Helm, David Letterman and Ed Sullivan Theatre
Levon Helm, David Letterman and Ed Sullivan Theatre
Levon Helm, David Letterman and Ed Sullivan Theatre
Levon Helm, David Letterman and Ed Sullivan Theatre

The Three Burials Of Melquiades Estrada Review


Extraordinary
Tommy Lee Jones made his big-screen acting debut in the 1970 classic Love Story, yet it took him over 20 years and impressive performances in movies like JFK and The Fugitive to become a household name. Acclaim for Jones as a director should come much faster, if his debut film, The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada, is a sign of things to come. Burials is a complex and remarkably assured film, taking the audience on a literal and metaphoric journey through the sand-blasted wastelands of south Texas to a point of redemption and agony, of forgiveness and searing regret.

Written by Guillermo Arriaga (Amores Perros, 21 Grams), the story is broken into several parts, each introduced by a chapter heading, jumping forward and backward in time. The action begins with two hunters coming upon the disinterred body of an illegal Mexican immigrant, Melquiades Estrada, who has been shot to death and hastily buried in a makeshift grave, only to have a coyote dig him up. The redneck sheriff (Dwight Yoakam) doesn't care enough about a dead Mexican to investigate his death, even though Melquiades' friend and employer, Pete Perkins (Jones), gives him evidence implicating a border patrolman.

Continue reading: The Three Burials Of Melquiades Estrada Review

The Three Burials Of Melquiades Estrada Review


Extraordinary
Tommy Lee Jones made his big-screen acting debut in the 1970 classic Love Story, yet it took him over 20 years and impressive performances in movies like JFK and The Fugitive to become a household name. Acclaim for Jones as a director should come much faster, if his debut film, The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada, is a sign of things to come. Burials is a complex and remarkably assured film, taking the audience on a literal and metaphoric journey through the sand-blasted wastelands of south Texas to a point of redemption and agony, of forgiveness and searing regret.

Written by Guillermo Arriaga (Amores Perros, 21 Grams), the story is broken into several parts, each introduced by a chapter heading, jumping forward and backward in time. The action begins with two hunters coming upon the disinterred body of an illegal Mexican immigrant, Melquiades Estrada, who has been shot to death and hastily buried in a makeshift grave, only to have a coyote dig him up. The redneck sheriff (Dwight Yoakam) doesn't care enough about a dead Mexican to investigate his death, even though Melquiades' friend and employer, Pete Perkins (Jones), gives him evidence implicating a border patrolman.

Continue reading: The Three Burials Of Melquiades Estrada Review

Coal Miner's Daughter Review


Excellent
British documentarian Michael Apted was a curious choice to direct the life story of Loretta Lynn, but he certainly does a commendable job at the task. Sissy Spacek, of course, owns this movie as Lynn -- she won the Best Actress Oscar for it. Not only is she spot-on as an oblivious teen who stumbles into an early marriage and a life of singing country, but she actually performs all her own songs in the film. The film stumbles a bit when deadline with Lynn's chronic exhaustion (and the movie takes its share of factual liberties, too), but in the end you'll be proud to watch a Coal Miner's Daughter.

The Last Waltz Review


Extraordinary
The Band were one of the best rock groups of the '60s and '70s, creating a unique brand of music that incorporated elements of folk, blues, and soul -- ironically, at the time when those elements were being squeezed out of rock by groups such as Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd.

Unfortunately, the Band's music didn't have much influence on the way future music would develop. But The Last Waltz, a concert film of the Band's 1976 farewell performance, remains an essential artwork. The film is a reminder that while they lasted, the Band (guitarist Robbie Robertson, drummer Levon Helm, keyboardists Garth Hudson and Richard Manuel, and bassist Rick Danko) was as good as any group in rock history.

Continue reading: The Last Waltz Review

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