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A Wreath Of Flowers Is Placed On The Star Of The Late Actor Leslie Nielsen On Hollywood Boulevard.

Leslie Nielsen Monday 29th November 2010 A wreath of flowers is placed on the star of the late actor Leslie Nielsen on Hollywood Boulevard. Los Angeles, California

Leslie Nielsen
Leslie Nielsen
Leslie Nielsen
Leslie Nielsen
Leslie Nielsen

The 'Stan Helsing' Premiere At The ArcLight Theater - Arrivals

Leslie Nielsen - Leslie Nielsen and wife Barbaree Earl Nielsen Tuesday 20th October 2009 at Arclight Theater Los Angeles, California

Leslie Nielsen
Leslie Nielsen
Leslie Nielsen
Leslie Nielsen

An American Carol Review


Grim
To hear Conservatives tell it, Hollywood is out of touch with the true "America." To them, the ultra-liberal product produced by the morally (and creatively) bankrupt individuals of Tinseltown just doesn't reflect the country's true tone and temperament. As a way of standing up for what they hold true and dear, card carrying member of the USA, A-OK brigade, David Zucker (of Airplane! and Naked Gun fame) has created a pro-country, anti-dissent spoof of the Charles Dickens yuletide classic. Yet An American Carol misses a golden opportunity to show a sense of humor. Instead, it wallows in the kind of "us vs. them" tactics that created such complaints in the first place.

Michael Malone (Kevin Farley) is a documentary filmmaker famous for his anti-USA efforts like America Sucks the Big One. On the strength of his celebrity, he's organized a march against the Fourth of July. While his agent (James Woods) thinks he's crazy, a group of terrorists led by the evil Aziz (Robert Davi) think he's the perfect patsy for their ongoing jihad. They hire him to make a "movie" which is actually a front for a suicide bombing at a Trace Adkins concert. Happy to pursue his radical idealistic ends, Malone is suddenly visited by the ghost of his idol, JFK (Chris Anglin). He warns that he will be visited by three more ghosts, including Gen. George F. Patton (Kelsey Grammer). All hope to change his left-leaning ways, guiding him toward a more patriotic position.

Continue reading: An American Carol Review

Superhero Movie Review


Grim
Anyone hoping for a ray of sunshine through all the dank, dark clouds that have made up the recent rash of genre spoofs -- Scary Movie, Epic Movie, Meet the Spartans -- should semi-celebrate. Superhero Movie is not the heinous hunk of landfill those other attempts at humor represent. Instead, it's a seldom hit/often miss attempt by some former members of the Airplane! team to recapture a little of that film's old school satire. While much more successful, there's still a dearth of legitimate laughs to be found among the filler and failed lampoons.

High school nerd Rick Riker (Drake Bell) pines for popular gal Jill Johnson (Sara Paxton), and she holds a secret torch for him as well. Still, the couple can't get together, and while on a field trip to a local science lab, Rick is bitten by a radioactive insect. Soon, he has superpowers, like incredible reflexes and the ability to climb walls. He becomes the Dragonfly. Meanwhile, mogul Lou Landers (Christopher McDonald) is dying and looks to an experimental DNA treatment to cure him. The procedure backfires, turning the CEO into a life force draining demon. In order to achieve immortality, thousands must die, and while Landers develops an evil persona known as the Hourglass to achieve his aims, Rick tries to save the city -- and get the girl -- at the same time.

Continue reading: Superhero Movie Review

Airplane! Review


Essential
If Airplane! isn't the funniest English-language movie ever made, it could at least get into some spirited comedy fisticuffs with Monty Python and the Holy Grail, A Fish Called Wanda, or Wayne's World for the title. It might win, too. The first non-sketch film from the team of Zucker (David), Abrahams, and Zucker (Jerry) established the joke-a-minute-spoof subgenre, frequented by various iterations of the Zucker-Abrahams-Zucker team (not to mention several imitators); this means it gets credit for The Naked Gun, but also the blame for Scary Movie 2.

But Airplane! doesn't reign just by calling firsties. Or rather, it does - because it hit the bull's eye so dead-center that there wasn't much room left for other arrows. It purportedly spoofs the airplane-based disaster movies so popular at the time of its 1980 release, but much of the main plot (a scarred war pilot must attempt to land a passenger jet during a storm when the crew falls ill) and even some specific scene are lifted from the little-known 1957 B-movie Zero Hour (unseen by me); it simultaneously satirizes one particularly obscure film, '70s disaster films, and every bad B-movie you've ever seen.

Continue reading: Airplane! Review

Spy Hard Review


Terrible
Ugh. This is one of those reviews where I don't really know how to begin. Suffice it to say that I should have listened to all the friends of mine who refused to go see Spy Hard with me, saying that it wasn't their style, that star Leslie Nielsen had lost his comedic sense, or that the movie just plain looked bad.

They were all right.

Continue reading: Spy Hard Review

Forbidden Planet Review


Weak
If the goings-on that take place under alien skies on the surface of Altair-4 in 1956's Forbidden Planet seem familiar, it's not just because the planet's name was recycled later for the Star Trek universe, but also because this film was the well-drunk-from by so much cinematic and televisual sci-fi of the following decades. The stalwart explorers, deserted planet, missing planetary explorers, a mysterious evil that may have a less than completely corporeal source; there's a reason that the film has been called the most influential sci-fi flick until Star Wars (actually more so, since nobody was ever really able to recapture Lucas' peculiar magic). It's unfortunate then, that as inspirational as it may have been, Forbidden Planet wasn't a better film.

Set further in the future than most sci-fi tales, the undistinguished script by Cyril Hume -- inspired by Shakespeare's The Tempest, especially the magician Prospero and his magical spirit agent Ariel -- takes place in the 23rd century, when the human race has finally burst the bonds of our solar system and is truly exploring space. A spaceship crew (in an actual flying saucer, a rare thing for humans in films of this sort) is on its way to Altair-4 to find out what happened to the crew of the Bellerophon, which touched down 20 years back and hasn't been heard from since. A strange voice informs the crew to land only at their own peril, which they do. Not long after landing, the crew -- led by a stalwart and spry pre-Airplane Leslie Nielsen -- is taken by a friendly and nearly all-powerful robot (as in Robby the Robot, soon to grace the small screen on Lost in Space) to meet that warning voice. Dr. Morbius (Walter Pidgeon), a mysterious fellow with little use for strangers but in possession of a nubile blonde daughter who takes a shine to the first male strangers she's ever seen, is the sole survivor of the Bellerophon's crew. The others? Killed in brutal fashion by some strange and disembodied alien presence, which may just still be around to threaten the newcomers.

Continue reading: Forbidden Planet Review

Scary Movie 4 Review


Grim
Scary Movie 4 is inane, gross, ridiculous, and pretty stupid. It also made me laugh more than once. That's evidently becoming the theme of slapstick spoof shtick (or at least the endless stream of Scary Movies), that they head straight for the lowest common denominator but amid all of the diarrhea jokes and people getting beaned in the face with flying objects, they hit upon something genuinely witty, almost by accident.

The dumb jokes are, of course, framed in send-ups of other box office hits from the last couple of years - Anna Faris's spectacularly inept and oblivious Cindy Campbell, who appeared in all the previous films, moves into the house from The Grudge, next door to Tom Cruise's - oh, sorry, Tom Ryan's - house from War of the Worlds. The plot, such as it is, somewhat follows the Worlds story, but is really a cobbled-together excuse to veer from spoof to spoof like a sketch comedy, and the dialogue, such as it is, is almost entirely forgettable. Actually, it's largely a time killer, something for the actors to do while carefully oblivious to the antics around them and not really meant to be heard over the guffaws of the audience.

Continue reading: Scary Movie 4 Review

Forbidden Planet Review


Excellent
You might not notice it, but 1991's Total Recall is a serious homage to Forbidden Planet (itself a rendition of Shakespeare's The Tempest), what with its ancient race of superintelligent (and extinct) beings and a lovely lass who gets the spacemen to act all googly. Of course, Rachel Ticotin is no Anne Francis, and Arnold Schwarzenegger is no Leslie Nielsen, barely recognizable here in one of his first movies. Part space opera, part haunted house story, Planet's simple mystery is this: Why are there only two people left alive on a remote planetary outpost, and why don't they want our heroes to drop in for a visit? The answer is surprisingly erudite for 1950s B-cinema, and the effects are positively groundbreaking for the era (not to mention, the film introduced the classic Robby the Robot to the world). A true classic that is starting to look dated, but which still holds up well.

Scary Movie 3 Review


OK
There are lots of ways to churn out sequels, particularly comedies. You can speed along like a runaway train to capitalize on a surprise hit -- Miramax rushed Scary Movie 2 into theaters one year after the original's release -- or you can reset and go for broke. The latter approach seems to be the Scary Movie 3 motive, with new writers and veteran parody director David Zucker (Airplane!, The Naked Gun) joining the fray. For its efforts, Miramax gets a perfectly average movie, with fresh moments, lame retreads, and more opportunity for big box office.

Scary Movie 3 sticks with the program: mind-bogglingly dumb characters hustle their way through spoofs of the industry's most popular recent films. It's no mistake that the roasted movies -- in this case: Signs, The Ring, and 8 Mile -- all pull in huge money and attract a young audience.

Continue reading: Scary Movie 3 Review

Santa Who? Review


Grim
Leslie Nielsen as an amnesiac Santa?

Continue reading: Santa Who? Review

Spy Hard Review


Terrible
Ugh. This is one of those reviews where I don't really know how to begin. Suffice it to say that I should have listened to all the friends of mine who refused to go see Spy Hard with me, saying that it wasn't their style, that star Leslie Nielsen had lost his comedic sense, or that the movie just plain looked bad.

They were all right.

Continue reading: Spy Hard Review

Dracula: Dead And Loving It Review


Terrible
After the vastly disappointing Robin Hood: Men in Tights, Mel Brooks really needed to prove himself by getting back to his Young Frankenstein and Blazing Saddles-type comedy. The Dracula legend seemed like the perfect way to do it, especially considering how perfectly Brooks skewered ol' Frank. But sadly, Brooks manages to hack it up like he did to poor Robin Hood, thanks to some very stale jokes and overly repetitious gags.

Brooks basically takes Bram Stoker's Dracula (Francis Ford Coppola's film) and gives it the once-over, recreating the plot and characters almost directly from that movie, and giving them supposedly funny lines. The problem is that Bram Stoker's Dracula was pretty silly to begin with, and Brooks' version comes off as poking fun at a film that was already doing a good job of it all by itself.

Continue reading: Dracula: Dead And Loving It Review

Men With Brooms Review


OK
In the litany of movies about the sport of curling, Men with Brooms stands out as one of the best, if not the best ever!

Okay, there are no other movies about curling (to my knowledge), and this film is short of spectacular, but it's amusing enough to merit a peek. It's certainly Leslie Nielsen's best work in many years.

Continue reading: Men With Brooms Review

Airplane! Review


Essential
If Airplane! isn't the funniest English-language movie ever made, it could at least get into some spirited comedy fisticuffs with Monty Python and the Holy Grail, A Fish Called Wanda, or Wayne's World for the title. It might win, too. The first non-sketch film from the team of Zucker (David), Abrahams, and Zucker (Jerry) established the joke-a-minute-spoof subgenre, frequented by various iterations of the Zucker-Abrahams-Zucker team (not to mention several imitators); this means it gets credit for The Naked Gun, but also the blame for Scary Movie 2.

But Airplane! doesn't reign just by calling firsties. Or rather, it does - because it hit the bull's eye so dead-center that there wasn't much room left for other arrows. It purportedly spoofs the airplane-based disaster movies so popular at the time of its 1980 release, but much of the main plot (a scarred war pilot must attempt to land a passenger jet during a storm when the crew falls ill) and even some specific scene are lifted from the little-known 1957 B-movie Zero Hour (unseen by me); it simultaneously satirizes one particularly obscure film, '70s disaster films, and every bad B-movie you've ever seen.

Continue reading: Airplane! Review

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