Leonardo Nam

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Leonardo Nam, Randall Park, Ken Jeong , Diana Bang - 14th Annual Unforgettable Gala - Inside at Beverly Hilton Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Saturday 12th December 2015

Leonardo Nam, Randall Park, Ken Jeong and Diana Bang
Leonardo Nam, Randall Park, Ken Jeong and Diana Bang
Leonardo Nam, Randall Park, Ken Jeong and Diana Bang
Leonardo Nam
Leonardo Nam
Leonardo Nam

Leonardo Nam and Sandra Oh - Moms Night Out Premiere at TCL Chinese Theater - Red Carpet - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 29th April 2014

Leonardo Nam and Sandra Oh
Leonardo Nam and Sandra Oh
Leonardo Nam
Leonardo Nam

One For The Money Trailer


Stephanie Plum is down on her luck. She hasn't had a job in months, she is recently divorced and her car has been repossessed. She needs to turn her life around. Luckily for her, her cousin runs a bail bond business and offers Stephanie a job there as a recovery agent.

Continue: One For The Money Trailer

Leonardo Nam, Bill Paxton, Lydia and Beverly Hilton Hotel Tuesday 22nd February 2011 13th Annual Costume Designers Guild Awards held at The Beverly Hilton hotel Beverly Hills, California

Leonardo Nam, Bill Paxton, Lydia and Beverly Hilton Hotel
Leonardo Nam, Joel Schumacher and Beverly Hilton Hotel
Leonardo Nam, Lydia and Beverly Hilton Hotel

Undoing Review


Good
Some people have what it takes to get revenge. Some people don't. That's the painful lesson that Sam Kim (Sung Kang) learns as he pokes a stick into the hornet's nest of L.A.'s drug underworld and stirs up a lot more trouble than he expects. Chris Chan Lee's Undoing tells Sam's story, and though it's marred by way too many film school editing tricks, it's still a gripping little tale.

Sam should have stayed in Singapore, where he fled after accompanying his best friend Joon (Leonardo Nam) on a drug deal that went very bad and left Joon bleeding to death in Sam's getaway car. Rather than go to the cops, Sam hid the car and the body, taking his secret with him.

Continue reading: Undoing Review

Leonardo Nam Monday 28th July 2008 at the Eco-Friendly World Premiere of The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants 2 New York City, USA

Leonardo Nam

Leonardo Nam - Monday 28th July 2008 at Ziegfeld Theatre New York City, USA

Leonardo Nam

American Pastime Review


Good
Stumbling upon American Pastime soon after watching Ken Burns' epic World War II documentary The War was a happy coincidence. Burns does a great job telling the relatively unknown story of the Japanese-American internment camps, and this movie is a nicely detailed, albeit hokey, fictionalization of one family's experience in such a camp. Burns, who also produced a massive documentary on baseball, would certainly appreciate the film's pivotal baseball subplot.

When war breaks out, the Nomura family is enjoying a happy middle-class life in 1940s L.A. All that changes when the internment order arrives, and soon Mom (Judi Ongg), Dad (Masatoshi Nakamura), older brother Lane (Leonardo Nam), and younger brother Lyle (Aaron Yoo) find themselves in a drafty barracks in the middle of a desert somewhere in the American west. While most everyone tries to adapt with dignity, the volatile Lyle, who has been robbed not only of his baseball scholarship but also his beloved jazz music, simmers with rage. He's even more outraged when he learns that Lane has volunteered to fight with the 442nd division, the famous all Japanese-American unit that went on to glory in European fighting. Why would Lane want to fight for the same army that has machine guns trained on him day and night in the camp?

Continue reading: American Pastime Review

Little Athens Review


Weak
Ensemble comedies featuring interlocking stories seem to be all the rage these days, but boy does it take serious talent to pull off the intricate plotting and careful structure of one of these films. Tom Zuber (whose prior film, Lansdown, was nothing special either) either doesn't have the talent or the patience for such a story. Instead, he turns in a tired retread of umpteen "slackers do drugs, party, have sex, and get in trouble" movies which have grown so popular and so tiresome in the indie filmmaking scene.

Little Athens is no Pulp Fiction. We've got a small-time drug dealing kid (John Patrick Amedori) who steals a stash from his own dealer's dead cousin, a pair of EMTs (Erica Leerhsen and Rachel Miner) each dealing with issues of love and lust, and two slack-jawed losers (DJ Qualls and Jorge Garcia) who have just been evicted.

Continue reading: Little Athens Review

The Fast And The Furious: Tokyo Drift Review


Good
The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift plays like the archetypal Western. A newcomer arrives in town, upsets the locals, plays with hearts, and rides around a lot before a final "this town ain't big enough for the both of us" showdown sends him, or someone else, on their way. Of course, the movie is actually an Eastern: The frontier is Japan, the town is big enough for about 20 million, and there is plenty of horsepower, but not a mare or stallion in sight. Despite the setting, the basic principles remain unchanged. The stranger, Sean Boswell (Lucas Black) is an Alabaman High School student, sent away to live with his seafaring father (Brian Goodman) in Tokyo after getting in trouble with the law back home. It seems Sean can't stop racing cars. Unfortunately, for unknowing parents, the wild wild East of Japan is a paradise for the boy from the west, with its underground racing culture and scantily clad sirens, and soon Sean finds himself tangled in the criminal engine of his dangerous new town.In Tokyo, Sean meets Twinkie (Bow Wow), an iPod-dealing "army brat" who introduces him to the city's racing underworld. Every night, groups of outrageously dressed young people take their outrageously painted cars out for some dynamically orchestrated races. The Yakuza (Japanese mafia) is heavily involved in the races, and the Drift King, DK (Brian Tee), is high up in their ranks. Of course, in grand Point Break (and, um, Fast and the Furious) tradition, Sean takes a liking to DK's girl, Neela (Nathalie Kelley), causing DK to take an extreme disliking to Sean. The two race, and the newcomer loses. However, DK's business partner and seeming sage, Han (Sung Kang), sees a spark in the kid, and vows to train him in the ancient Japanese art of drifting (driving sideways). All Sean has to in return, is run a few criminal errands.To describe the plot of The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift is more effort than it's worth (and possibly more effort than it took to come up with). Plot, dialogue, character development: All are irrelevant. What clearly matters to the filmmakers, and one suspects, to those contemplating a trip to the theatre to see it, is the sound and fury of the thing. On this level, Justin Lin's film is a grand achievement. Every race and chase is brilliantly handled. The concept of drifting, really just a fancy name for a movement we've all seen before, is nonetheless utilized to breathtaking effect. When Sean races DK down a windy mountain road, both cars drifting dangerously close to an off-road disaster, Lin's camera plummets and whips around, itself racing and demonstrating the consequences of any potential mishaps. He is a director with an innovative eye suited to this kinetic material.Unfortunately, where the eye is strong, the ear is weak. Alfredo Botello, Chris Morgan and Kario Salem's screenplay is a paint-by-numbers job that fails even to color effectively within the lines. The script is woeful. There are attempts at exposition, humor and development, all of which fail and act merely as speed bumps for a film otherwise moving well. The most hilarious scene involves a rooftop discussion between Han and Sean, supposed to establish their bond and some bizarre driver philosophy, that instead sets itself up for instant parody.Despite its execrable screenplay, some dull performances (although it must be said that Black can scowl with the best of them), and failure on nearly almost every level but the action, Tokyo Drift still manages to kind of work. The racing scenes are that good and that frequent that one can almost forgive everything else. It's a Western: We know it's junk; we just want the showdown. On this level, the film provides. It is not as good as a certain other movie about "cars" currently playing, but then that movie hit on a fundamental point. It let the cars, not the people, do the talking. Looking at Twinkie's green Hulk car, I couldn't help but let my mind drift, and think, "Ahhh, if these cars could talk...."They went thattaway.

The Perfect Score Review


Good
Ocean's Eleven meets The Breakfast Club as six ambitious high school seniors hatch a plot to steal the answers to the SAT and advance with ease to the colleges of their choice.

For the record, I scored an 1110 on my SAT, which was fine with me. Then again, I wasn't nearly as motivated as these kids during my senior year. Though they run in different social circles, the scheming students of The Perfect Score are united by one common denominator - the SAT stands in the way of their career aspirations.

Continue reading: The Perfect Score Review

Leonardo Nam

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Leonardo Nam Movies

One For The Money Trailer

One For The Money Trailer

Stephanie Plum is down on her luck. She hasn't had a job in months, she...

Undoing Movie Review

Undoing Movie Review

Some people have what it takes to get revenge. Some people don't. That's the painful...

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The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift Movie Review

The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift Movie Review

The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift plays like the archetypal Western. A newcomer arrives...

The Perfect Score Movie Review

The Perfect Score Movie Review

Ocean's Eleven meets The Breakfast Club as six ambitious high school seniors hatch a plot...

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