Leo Fitzpatrick

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Cold Comes The Night Review


Good

While this low-key thriller is strikingly well shot and acted, it never seems like it digs very far beneath the surface. So while we're intrigued by its twisty plot, we can't quite figure out what the point is or why we should care. Still, director Chun shows real skill at capturing a rural community while keeping the mood dark and nasty.

At a sleazy roadside motel, manager Chloe (Eve) is saving up the cash kickbacks she gets from the prostitutes who use the rooms. She's determined to move somewhere nicer with her young daughter Sophia (Parker), and now this is becoming urgent since social services is threatening to take Sophia into care if they don't move soon. Then things get complicated when the nearly blind thug Topo (Cranston) arrives. Separated from his assistant, he forces Chloe to help him recover the package he's meant to deliver. But that's been stolen by the hotheaded young cop Billy (Marshall-Green), who has a twisted past with Chloe. Which is why Billy's wife (Cummings) is furious that she's now coming round the house.

All of this takes place in a small town not far from the US-Canada border, where the autumn chill is beginning to bite. The film captures a terrific sense of isolation in this place, where everyone knows everyone else's business but pretends not to care. Eve gives Chloe a surprising tenacity as she bravely deals with Topo's demands, hoping maybe she'll get something out of it. Well, she has nothing to lose, and everyone seems to underestimate her desperation.

Continue reading: Cold Comes The Night Review

Cold Comes The Night Trailer


Chloe is a financially unstable owner of a motel whose life is made all the more difficult by child protection services threatening to take her daughter Sophia away from her if she cannot relocate her to a safer residence. One day, when she hears a disturbance from one guest room, her world gets even more complicated when she discovers a dead body and bag full of cash. However, when the money goes missing, she and Sophia are held hostage by a partially sighted but dangerous Russian gangster who threatens to shoot Sophia if Chloe cannot help him retrieve the loot, which he believes has been stolen by a corrupted police officer. Now Chloe, who's been working in vain to care for her daughter to the best of her ability, faces the ultimate test of motherhood.

Continue: Cold Comes The Night Trailer

Leo Fitzpatrick Monday 18th October 2010 Leo Fitzpatrick attends the 2010 Mad Metalball held at the Museum of Art and Design New York City, USA

Leo Fitzpatrick
Leo Fitzpatrick
Leo Fitzpatrick

Leo Fitzpatrick Wednesday 9th December 2009 Paper Magazine 5th Annual Nightlife Awards at M2 Ultra Lounge New York City, USA

Leo Fitzpatrick

Leo Fitzpatrick Wednesday 14th October 2009 First Annual Mad Paperball Gala celebrating the Museum of Arts and Design one-year anniversary - inside New York City, USA

Leo Fitzpatrick Monday 13th July 2009 Proenza Schouler curate 'A Magazine' party at Soho Mews New York City, USA

Leo Fitzpatrick

Leo Fitzpatrick and Katie Ford Wednesday 11th June 2008 'For Art's Sake' hosted by Ross Bleckner and Katie Ford at the Openhouse Gallery. New York City, USA

Leo Fitzpatrick and Katie Ford
Leo Fitzpatrick and Katie Ford

Fay Grim Review


Weak
Roughly ten years after cementing his place as an offbeat indie favorite, Hal Hartley revisits the characters that put him there. His 1997 Henry Fool, a screenplay-award winner at Cannes, introduced us to lonely garbage man Simon Grim, his horny sister Fay, and the titular character that drastically changes their lives. Hartley brings them back with Fay Grim, but the "where are they now?" fun wears thin quickly.

Part of the problem is Hartley's distinct style, which, if you're a fan, you already know well. Characters often speak slowly, pausing pensively for dramatic or comedic effect. Conversations -- and camera angles -- are unexpectedly funny and skewed, dabbling in established genres. When this approach has purpose or emotion (as in Henry Fool), it works. When it runs in circles, as in the second-half of Fay Grim, it exists only for the "art" and can be annoying as hell.

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Kids Review


Excellent
So much hype has surrounded Kids, the gritty, "not rated" feature about New York teens, that it was almost impossible to go into the film objectively. I was expecting an ultra-graphic film about sex, drugs, and life on the mean city streets. That's about what I got.

The film follows a few characters through one day in New York City. Telly (Leo Fitzpatrick) and his buddy Casper (Justin Pierce) skateboard, do a little petty thievery, drink malt liquor, hustle drugs, beat up a black man, throw some dice, and if a virgin or two happen to cross their path, Telly is only too happy to perform a little "virgin surgery." On their trail is Jennie (Chloe Sevigny), a prior virginal conquest of Telly's, who discovers she is HIV-positive that morning and is on the verge of a nervous breakdown.

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The Girl From Monday Review


Weak
"Let's fuck and increase our market value," urges Cecile (Sabrina Lloyd) in director Hal Hartley's latest curiosity, an interesting yet static look at a consumerist tomorrow. In Hartley's flat satiric world, every citizen's worth is determined by his ability to conform and spend -- making Cecile's forceful suggestion selfish yet logical.

Described in the credits as "science fiction" (a pretty loose use of the term), The Girl From Monday represents another genre leap for Hartley, following his 2001 Beauty and the Beast fantasy, No Such Thing. Well, if you're a typical sci-fi fan, be forewarned: There are no special effects -- minus thugs in funny helmets -- and there's really nothing terribly innovative in the storyline department.

Continue reading: The Girl From Monday Review

Bully Review


Excellent
Larry Clark -- who wrote and directed his first film, Kids, at the tender age of 52 and in the process, broke the mold about what we should expect from a movie about teenagers -- returns to familiar ground in Bully, a striking and harrowing follow-up.

A slam-dunk natural subject for Clark, Bully follows the based-on-reality story of Marty Puccio (Brad Renfro), who along with his girlfriend Lisa (Rachel Miner) decides to brutally slay his "best friend" Bobby (Nick Stahl) as payback for a lifetime of abuse. Set in the ultra-trashy nether regions of southern Florida -- and I mean seriously, beyond-WWF trashy -- there's little to do but drive your car, play video games, have sex, and beat the crap out of your friends.

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Storytelling Review


Excellent
Writer-director Todd Solondz has a knack for making us feel downright uncomfortable. He did it in his twisted debut, Welcome to the Dollhouse (1995), with a young Brendan Sexton III announcing his intentions to rape an even younger Heather Matarazzo. He did it in Happiness (1998), in nearly every scene. And he's providing more squirm-inducing moments in Storytelling, a film with less intensity than Happiness, but with a continuing streak of intellectually challenging dialogue and unforgiving subject matter.

Aside from Solondz's decidedly risky topics, his format in Storytelling takes chances. It presents two separate shorts, entitled "Fiction" and "Non-fiction," with no obvious connection between the two. The only true thread is that both comment on the telling of tales, the shifting of points of view, and the way most people in Solondz's suburban landscapes constantly paddle their painful lives upstream.

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Serendipity Review


Good

Last year John Cusack -- modern Hollywood's most endeari=ngEveryman -- starred in a great guy movie with a romanticcomedy bent that made it the year's best date movie too.

This year's front runner for the same honor is a fate-fue=led,starry-eyed chick flick entitled "Serendipity" -- also starringJohn Cusack, which may help convince otherwise reluctant boyfriends andhusbands to see this sweet, cuddly charmer. They're guaranteed to enjoyit if they give it half a chance.

Cusack plays an ESPN segment director who meets the girlof his dreams (British girl-next-door Kate Beckinsale) in a Christmas shopp=ingshowdown over the last pair of black cashmere gloves at Bloomingdale's.Instantly smitten, they spend the day together, at one point ice skatingin Central Park and playing the getting-to-know-you game of favorites:"Favorite New York moment?" Beckinsale asks. "This one'sclimbing the charts," Cusack grins winningly.

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Storytelling Review


OK

Todd Solondz's "Storytelling" is designed to foster a sensation of absorbing discomfort, not unlike his earlier examinations of esoteric, emotionally disquieting Americana "Welcome to the Dollhouse" and "Happiness." But this film's two shrewd but pointless short stories are suppressed by the underlying feeling that the film got worked over something fierce in post-production, and that half its guts are lying on a cutting room floor somewhere.

The conspicuously abrupt first segment, entitled "Fiction," runs about 20 minutes and stars Selma Blair ("Legally Blonde") and Leo Fitzpatrick ("Bully") in painfully authentic performances as an emotionally insecure coed and her cerebral palsy-stricken dorm neighbor and lover. Unable to connect emotionally, they each vent their frustrations in pallid short stories about their thinly veiled real lives for a creative writing class. These yarns are not well received by their ruthlessly candid classmates, who pass judgment on Blair's and Fitzpatrick's meager authoring talents and, by extension, their messed-up lives.

Desperately seeking some kind of acceptance, the frail, troubled Blair surrenders herself sexually to her even more cruel professor (Robert Wisdom). Once at his apartment, he forces her to spout racial epithets (she's white, he's black and about three times her size) while having his way with her rather violently and so graphically that Solondz covered the scene with a superimposed red box to avoid an NC-17.

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Bully Review


Good

A troubling vérité-style docudrama about worthless, contemptible, murderous teenage losers, "Bully" is a raw and graphic, half cautionary tale, half exploitation flick, similar to director Larry Clark's controversial 1995 film "Kids."

But as infamous as "Kids" was for its grossly candid depiction of drug use and careless, even vengeful sex, it was largely fictional. "Bully" isn't quite as coarse, but may be more chilling as it is based on true events: The circumstances surrounding the very premeditated but very sloppy slaying of a malevolent south Florida delinquent who physically intimidated and verbally abused his friends until, well, they killed him.

Fascinating in a "Cops"-meets-Psychology Today, can't-help-but-look kind of way, every character in this film is a vile imbecile -- the kind of nitwits who genuinely look to angry white rapper Eminem as a role model.

Continue reading: Bully Review

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Benedict Cumberbatch Interviews Tom Hiddleston, But Avoids The Taylor Swift Question

Benedict Cumberbatch Interviews Tom Hiddleston, But Avoids The Taylor Swift Question

One Marvel Universe star interviewed another, as part of Interview magazine's October edition.

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Leo Fitzpatrick Movies

Cold Comes the Night Movie Review

Cold Comes the Night Movie Review

While this low-key thriller is strikingly well shot and acted, it never seems like it...

Cold Comes The Night Trailer

Cold Comes The Night Trailer

Chloe is a financially unstable owner of a motel whose life is made all the...

Fay Grim Movie Review

Fay Grim Movie Review

Roughly ten years after cementing his place as an offbeat indie favorite, Hal Hartley revisits...

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Bully Movie Review

Bully Movie Review

Larry Clark -- who wrote and directed his first film, Kids, at the tender age...

Storytelling Movie Review

Storytelling Movie Review

Writer-director Todd Solondz has a knack for making us feel downright uncomfortable. He did...

Storytelling Movie Review

Storytelling Movie Review

Todd Solondz's "Storytelling" is designed to foster a sensation of absorbing discomfort, not unlike his...

Serendipity Movie Review

Serendipity Movie Review

Last year John Cusack -- modern Hollywood's most endeari=ngEveryman -- starred in...

Bully Movie Review

Bully Movie Review

A troubling vérité-style docudrama about worthless, contemptible, murderous teenage losers, "Bully" is a raw and...

Personal Velocity Movie Review

Personal Velocity Movie Review

Comprised of three frank and psychologically resounding stories of women at crossroads in their relationships...

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