Lena Olin

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RFK Ripple Of Hope Gala

Lena Olin - Shots of a variety of stars as they arrived at the Robert F Kennedy Ripple Of Hope Gala awards ceremony which were held in Manhattan, New York, United States - Tuesday 16th December 2014

Lena Olin
Lena Olin
Lena Olin
Lena Olin

Video - Oprah Winfrey And Steven Spielberg Pose Together At 'The Hundred-Foot Journey' NY Premiere - Part 1


The cast and crew of restaurant drama 'The Hundred-Foot Journey' were seen arriving at the New York premiere held at the Ziegfeld Theater. Among them were producers Oprah Winfrey and Steven Spielberg, director Lasse Hallstrom and his wife Lena Olin and stars Om Puri and Charlotte Le Bon who play Papa and Marguerite respectively.

Continue: Video - Oprah Winfrey And Steven Spielberg Pose Together At 'The Hundred-Foot Journey' NY Premiere - Part 1

'The Hundred-Foot Journey' premiere

Lena Olin, Tora Hallstrom and Lasse Hallström - New York premiere of 'The Hundred-Foot Journey' at the Ziegfeld Theater - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Monday 4th August 2014

Lena Olin and Journey
Lena Olin and Journey
Lena Olin
Lena Olin

Premiere Of Relativity Media's "Safe Haven"

Lena Olin - Premiere Of Relativity Media's "Safe Haven" Los Angeles California United States Tuesday 5th February 2013

Lena Olin and Lasse Hallstrom
Lena Olin and Lasse Hallstrom
Lena Olin and Lasse Hallstrom
Lena Olin
Lena Olin

"Safe Haven" premiere held at TCL Chinese Theatre - Red Carpet

Lena Olin - "Safe Haven" premiere held at TCL Chinese Theatre - Red Carpet Los Angeles California United States Tuesday 5th February 2013

Lena Olin

Picture - Lena Olin , Sunday 13th January 2013

Lena Olin 70th Annual Golden Globe Awards held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel - Arrivals Featuring: Lena Olin Where: Los Angeles, California, United States When: 13 Jan 2013

Remember Me Review


Grim
Even before the manipulative final act, this film will get on the nerves of most viewers with its over-serious tone and sentimentalised plot. And the main problem is that all of this leaves the cast with little to do besides mope.

Tyler (Pattinson) is a 21-year-old student who still hasn't recovered from the suicide of his big brother six years ago. He devotes himself to his little sister Caroline (Jerins) and rebels against their wealthy father (Brosnan). When he's brutally arrested by a cop (Cooper), his chucklehead flatmate (Ellington) suggests that he get even by dating the cop's daughter Ally (de Ravin), a fellow student. It turns out that Ally also has a personal tragedy in her life, and of course they fall in love as they try to sort out their issues.

Continue reading: Remember Me Review

Awake Review


Terrible
Surprising, really, that "anesthetic awareness" -- helpless, immobile and, it should be noted, very rare consciousness during surgery -- hasn't been explored in a thriller before. Or maybe it has and I don't remember; that would explain why Awake sounds so novel but feels so familiar. In Joby Harold's film, young millionaire Clay Beresford (Hayden Christensen) is undergoing a risky heart transplant operation when he realizes the anesthetic isn't working as it should -- he is completely and silently paralyzed, but continues to hear and feel everything around him. If the movie wanted to top itself, it could find a way for Christensen to transfer immediately from anesthetic awareness into catalepsy, and maybe knock off Poe's "Premature Burial." Unfortunately and despite its killer gimmick, Awake isn't consumed with that kind of B-movie zeal.

Clay, like so many men before him, tries to block out the pain by intense concentration on thoughts of Jessica Alba (playing his girlfriend Sam -- though oddly enough, Clay's strongest memories reveal nothing more explicit than Alba's demurely exposed back). His focus breaks down when he overhears some, shall we say, less than reassuring words from his doctors, and from there a trapped Clay races against time, desperately attempting to alert Sam and/or his possessive mother (Lena Olin) of the danger he's in.

Continue reading: Awake Review

Casanova Review


Good
Hey, guys. Are you having trouble with the ladies? Got your eye on that cute cocktail waitress at your local bar, but aren't sure how to make a move? In love with that gorgeous female coworker who still doesn't know you exist? Have a crush on that hot chick who sits next to you in chemistry class, but fear you don't have what it takes to score? If so, look no further, because Venice's most notorious womanizer is here to show you all the right moves.

Call him an 18th century Hitch, if you will -- he's Casanova (Heath Ledger), and he has so many admirers he doesn't need to sleep with the same woman more than once, and seldom does. How does he do it? Is it his uncanny charm? His undeniable charisma? His stunning good looks? His fashionable wardrobe? Who knows? But what whatever he's doing, it definitely works.

Continue reading: Casanova Review

Romeo Is Bleeding Review


OK
Lena Olin is up to her old tricks again, as are Gary Oldman, Juliette Lewis, and Annabella Sciorra, in this twisted tale of a slightly corrupt cop and the company he keeps. Not much about Romeo is Bleeding sticks with you for long, the exception being Olin's shrieking hit-woman who ends up with one arm... Delightfully bizarre.

Darkness Review


Terrible
I love road trips. Not because I'm especially fond of sitting in my car for days at a time, but because with each passing mile a promise is fulfilled. Every hour behind the wheel draws you nearer to your destination, and along the way you can sit back, relax, and enjoy the ride. But, though paperback self-help writers may tell you otherwise, the journey itself is not enough. You have to actually get somewhere to make the whole trip worthwhile. And if, at the end of a day's travel, you haven't gone anywhere at all, you've wasted all your time and a whole lot of gas.

Like a long road trip to nowhere, Spanish director Jaume Balagueró's Darkness is miserable, frustrating, and hard on the buttocks. Though the film's run time is a mere 102 minutes, the psychological impact of wasting precious money and energy staring at the screen and waiting for something -- anything -- to happen could take years off your life.

Continue reading: Darkness Review

Hollywood Homicide Review


Grim
Ron Shelton fans (you know who you are) will be happy to hear that Hollywood Homicide improves on Dark Blue, the director's failed LAPD endeavor from earlier this year. But that's like saying white paint tastes a little better than purple paint. For the sake of your health, neither should be ingested.

As part of its tired buddy-cop routine, Homicide suggests that everyone in La La Land works one career but dreams of another. Cops want to be real estate brokers, musicians want to be actors. So it's only appropriate that the film plays along with this concept, laboring as a police investigation by day and moonlighting as an entertainment industry spoof after hours.

Continue reading: Hollywood Homicide Review

Mystery Men Review


Good
"Hey now, you're an all-star, get your game on, go play..." then sit back and watch America's newest superheroes screw up, in this summer's new comedy, Mystery Men. In this Tim Burtonesque film by Kinka Usher, a ragtag band of superheroes set out to rescue Captain Amazing (a Superman comparable played by Greg Kinear) from the evil clutches of the criminal mastermind, Cassanova Frankenstein (Geoffrey Rush).

Mystery Men is one of the funniest films I've seen all year. It combines the hilarious randomness of films like Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me, with a satirical twist that today's audiences are sure to appreciate. Now don't get me wrong, Mystery Men is no masterpiece, but it made me laugh (a lot) and that's what the film is about. Mystery Men scores high in all areas. It has an entirely kooky and original plot fueled by crack up dialogue, mesmerizing scenery, (which is reminiscent of the Batman movies) and an awesome cast.

Continue reading: Mystery Men Review

Polish Wedding Review


Weak
I have absolutely no idea how this film, by first-timer Connelly, got made. Take a big lecherous Italian family melodrama and replace it with a Polish family, and you've got this pretty dull pic.

The Unbearable Lightness of Being Review


Extraordinary
When I first watched The Unbearable Lightness of Being, I was dating a poet who had read and loved the book. Not wanting to involve myself in reading the book at that point, I rented the movie instead. I loved it then and I love it now, but, at this point in time, I can compare it to the novel by Milan Kundera. The two are both vastly similar and vastly different. As an adaptation, it succeeds in transcribing the events of the novel, but does not do as well in successfully demonstrating its points.

The Unbearable Lightness of Being focuses on Tomas (Daniel-Day Lewis), a Don Juanist terrified of commitment and a surgeon at a Prague hospital. He is trapped between his platonic and semi-erotic love of Teresa (Academy Award winner Juliette Binoche), a photographer and his wife and a erotic and semi-platonic love of Sabina (Lena Olin), a painter and his mistress.

Continue reading: The Unbearable Lightness of Being Review

Lena Olin

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