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Taylor Blamed Marvin For Burton's Drinking


Elizabeth Taylor Lee Marvin Richard Burton Roger Moore

Dame Elizabeth Taylor blamed Oscar winner Lee Marvin for introducing her husband Richard Burton to alcohol, according to her close pal Sir Roger Moore.

Burton struggled with alcoholism for years and it is believed his addiction contributed to the breakdown of his first marriage to his Cleopatra co-star.

And Taylor warned James Bond actor Moore, who lived near her in Gstaad, Switzerland, about working with Marvin, who she held responsible for Burton's alcoholism.

Moore recalls, "Having worked with Liz I also knew her personally from being neighbours in Gstaad, when she was married to Richard Burton. We often socialised.

Continue reading: Taylor Blamed Marvin For Burton's Drinking

Moore's Fight With Marvin


James Bond Roger Moore Lee Marvin

Former James Bond star SIR Roger Moore was once embroiled in a fistfight with fellow actor Lee Marvin, after the late star mistook a choreographed fight scene for real life.


The pair starred together in 1976 movie Shout At The Devil, and Moore recalls his colleague often staggered on to the set suffering from a hangover.


And during a crucial moment of filming, Marvin got confused when Moore threw the first staged punch of the fight scene - and hit him back for real.


Moore says, "I loved Lee, he was larger than life. However, he did drink and some days he'd come on set with rather red eyes.

Continue reading: Moore's Fight With Marvin

Marvin Tops Movie Badass Poll


Lee Marvin

Late tough guy Lee Marvin has topped a new poll naming the biggest movie badasses.
Marvin's role as Walker in '60s cult classic Point Blank tops the list in American magazine Maxim.
Joint in second place are actors Jamison Newlander, Corey Haim and Corey Feldman, all honoured for their roles in vampire movie The Lost Boys.
Legendary hard man Charles Bronson's performance in The Magnificent Seven rounds out the fop five.
The Top 10 Movie Badasses are:
1. Lee Marvin in Point Blank (1967)
2. Jamison Newlander in The Lost Boys (1987)
2. Corey Haim in The Lost Boys (1987)
2. Corey Feldman in The Lost Boys (1987)
5. Charles Bronson in The Magnificent Seven (1960)
6. Jean Reno in Leon (aka The Professional) (1994)
7. James Caan in Thief (1981)
8. Michael Caine in Get Carter (1971)
9. Tony Jaa in The Protector (2005)
10. Choi Min-Sik in Oldboy (2003).

The Dirty Dozen Review


Good
Can The Dirty Dozen really be 40 years old? Well, almost. This watershed film paved the ways for bad-guys-as-heroes flicks ranging from The Wild Bunch to Reservoir Dogs, and its influence is still felt today. Yet how can The Dirty Dozen feel so tired when viewed in this millennium? Maybe its a cast that, though exquisite, is a bit much. The Dirty Dozen also appears to have paved the way for the Airport movies, studded with megastars and short on plot. Viewed today, too much of Dozen is schlocky and trite, reliant on stereotypes that border on Hogan's Heroes-level characterizations to tell the WWII-era story. (Writ large: 12 career criminals are given a last chance to pull off a major anti-Nazi mission.) The film is pioneering, daring, and very well made. But there's a bit much to go around, and now you can see the actors jockeying for notice among each other. Still a good film, though its impact is now starting to fade.

Continue reading: The Dirty Dozen Review

Two-time Oscar Nominee Jack Warden Dead At 85


Jack Warden Lee Marvin Warren Beatty Shampoo Keanu Reeves The Replacements

Veteran actor Jack Warden has died in New York. He was 85.
The Emmy-winning HEAVEN CAN WAIT star, who was twice nominated for an Academy Award, was born JOHN H LEBZELTER in September, 1920.
He was raised in Louisville, Kentucky, where he was expelled from Du Pont Manuel High School for fighting and decided to put his violent streak to good use in the boxing ring.
After boxing professionally, he then joined the Navy in the late 1930s, and served in China before becoming a Merchant Marine and later signing up for the US Army, where he became a paratrooper with the elite 101st Airborne Division.
A training injury landed him in hospital, where Warden became inspired to act after reading a play. He turned professional in 1947, making his TV debut a year later and enjoyed steady work until 1952 when he earned his big Broadway, New York break in GOLDEN BOY.
His movie career took off shortly afterwards with an impressive debut opposite Lee Marvin in YOU'RE IN THE NAVY NOW. The 1950s also saw Warden appear in movie classics FROM HERE TO ETERNITY, TWELVE ANGRY MEN and RUN SILENT RUN DEEP.
Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, Warden became a regular face on TV in the US ann won an Emmy for his portrayal of an American football coach in drama BRIAN'S SONG in the early 70s.
But Warden will perhaps be best remembered for two Warren Beatty film in the 1970s - Heaven Can Wait and Shampoo - and his role as a newspaper editor in ALL THE PRESIDENT'S MEN.
He retired to New York after filming Keanu Reeves sports film The Replacements in 2000.
Warden is survived by his wife of 48 years, former French actress VANDA DUPRE, and their son CHRISTOPHER.

Bruce Lee Tells Medium Curse Of The Dragon Is For Real


Brandon Lee Victoria Bullis Lee Marvin Steve McQueen

The fabled `Curse of The Dragon' which fans believe claimed the lives of martial arts father and son BRUCE and Brandon Lee has dogged the family for centuries, according to a top Hollywood medium. Victoria Bullis has contacted movie icon Bruce Lee from beyond the grave for her column in US magazine Stuff and insists the famous curse claimed his life and that of his son. She reveals, "The curse is from another lifetime, when they were both Chinese warlords. They came down from Mongolia and wiped out a lot of Eastern Europe in the 10th century. "They were murderers. Brandon was part of this, but Bruce was at the head of it. "Shamans put a curse on them and their heirs forevermore... Brandon is asking me not to say a lot about this because his mother will probably read it and be hurt." Meanwhile, Bullis also reveals that Bruce Lee has formed a heavenly alliance with dead tough guys Lee Marvin and Steve McQueen. She adds, "They're all up there together."

Sunderland Blasts Dirty Dozen Remake


Donald Sutherland Robert Aldrich Lee Marvin Charles Bronson MTV

Veteran actor Donald Sutherland has slammed Hollywood's plans to remake his classic 1967 anti-war movie THE DIRTY DOZEN. Sutherland credits the film, directed by Robert Aldrich and featuring a galaxy of stars including Lee Marvin and Charles Bronson, with launching his own career. But the 70-year-old fears the forthcoming remake will sacrifice the anti-combat intent of the original film. He tells MTV, "It's silly. Robert Aldrich was making a film against war; most movies glorify war and he was showing how brutal and vulgar and awful it was. It's not an adventure story. "Forget it. Go look at JIMMY BROWN falling on cobblestones (in the original film). That's a piece of work."

7 Men From Now Review


Essential
It's with a heavy heart that I admit this, both to readers and myself: nobody cares about westerns anymore. Well, maybe Tommy Lee Jones, but he's that all-too-rare exception. It's hard to imagine that not too long ago (the 1940s and '50s) westerns were considered high entertainment, only exceeded by comedies and musicals. And though the genre was dominated by masters like John Ford and Howard Hawks, a film like Budd Boetticher's 7 Men from Now still got some attention from viewers. These days, without major critical hype and publicity, you wonder if it would even make a bleep on the radar.

An obvious forbearer to Clint Eastwood's groundbreaking Unforgiven, 7 Men concerns Ben Stride (Randolph Scott), the former sheriff of Silver Springs and a recently widowed drifter. Not a drifter without purpose, however. When seven men held up a Wells Fargo office, they killed Stride's wife and ran off with twenty grand. In a chilling opening scene, Stride kills off two of them in a small cave and then heads off to find the rest. Early in his mission he runs across Annie and John Greer (Gail Russell and Walter Reed, respectively), a couple heading to California to find their fortune. He also runs across an ex-con that he locked up once, Bill Masters (the ever-brilliant Lee Marvin), who agrees to help Stride for the possibility of picking up the stolen loot. But, as always, nothing is as it seems.

Continue reading: 7 Men From Now Review

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance Review


Good
James Stewart and Lee Marvin square off in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, the Citizen Kane of westerns -- about a Senator (Stewart) from the old west who returns who for the funeral of an old cowboy friend (the inimitable John Wayne), whereupon he is quizzed about his rise to power as a politician, thanks to his slaying of the evil highwayman Liberty Valance (Marvin). What follows is an unraveling of the legend behind the infamous shootout, when Stewart's pantywaist lawyer somehow outdid the rough-and-tumble villain.

A classic John Ford film (and one of the last black and white westerns to be made), Wayne and Stewart make a great Odd Couple in the podunk town of Shinbone. Unfortunately, the middle of the film sags under the overly patriotic history lessons we are given when Stewart takes it upon himself to teach the locals how to read and write. The ensuing fight for statehood isn't much better, except when Valance comes a-knockin'.

Continue reading: The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance Review

Gorky Park Review


Weak
America's obsession with all things Soviet gave us this movie, the inevitable mystery set in the snow-shrouded, fur-hatted land of Russia (though actually shot in Helsinki). With William Hurt and Lee Marvin in the lead roles, it's hard to see how this film could go wrong, and yet it does, quite horribly. Joanna Pacula is wooden in her first movie appearance, as a Russkie ingenue who basically knows everything about why there are three bodies in a Moscow park with their faces ripped off, though she isn't talking to the cops (led by Hurt). Ultimately a mystery is revealed, and boy is it a doozy: it involves fur coats! If I ever have to hear the phrase "the sables" again I think I'll shoot myself. Hopelessly dated and morose -- and much is lost from the bestselling novel.
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