Laurie Metcalf

Laurie Metcalf

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Yardbird Southern Table & Bar grand opening

Laurie Metcalf - Yardbird Southern Table & Bar grand opening - Arrivals at Palazzo Las Vegas - Las Vegas, Nevada, United States - Saturday 24th January 2015

Laurie Metcalf

'FRANK The Man. The Music.' debut evening

Laurie Metcalf - 'FRANK The Man. The Music.' debut evening - Arrivals at Palazzo Theater - Las Vegas, Nevada, United States - Saturday 24th January 2015

Laurie Metcalf

Tony Eve Cocktail Party

Laurie Metcalf - Tony Eve Cocktail Party held at LDV Hospitality's Lugo Caffe - New York, NY, United States - Saturday 8th June 2013

Opening night curtain call for 'The Other Place' at the Manhattan Theatre Club

John Schiappa, Sharr White, Daniel Stern and Laurie Metcalf - John Schiappa, Sharr White, Daniel Stern, Laurie Metcalf New York, United States Opening night curtain call for 'The Other Place' at the Manhattan Theatre Club Thursday 10th January 2013

Opening night curtain call for 'The Other Place' at the Manhattan Theatre Club

Laurie Metcalf New York, United States Opening night curtain call for 'The Other Place' at the Manhattan Theatre Club Thursday 10th January 2013

Toy Story 2 [in 3D] Review


Excellent
While this film looks terrific in 3D, it doesn't quite stand up over time.

There's an odd sense of dragging in the middle, and some of the action sequences feel like they never quite crank up to high gear.

On the other hand, the film is a series of gorgeously conceived set pieces and terrific character interaction and, unlike newer films, it's not afraid to get a bit grim. Stinky Pete's character is especially well-realised, right through to the anarchic closing-credit outtakes. As with most good sequels, the secret is to create strong new characters, and Stinky Pete certainly does that. It's also great to have Barbie in this world.

Continue reading: Toy Story 2 [in 3D] Review

Meet the Robinsons Review


Extraordinary
When it looked like Disney and Pixar were about to part ways a few years back, Disney decided to ramp up its own 3-D animation studio in order to keep putting these lucrative movies on the market. The results (Chicken Little, for example) have been lackluster so far, but after years of effort it finally looks like Disney has again figured out how to make animated movies that work... just in time to complete its multi-billion dollar acquisition of Pixar.

Now that they're all one company, I'm not sure what the future holds for Disney's in-house animation studio, but Meet the Robinsons will probably be the best thing it ever produces, no matter what happens at this point. But that's not damning with faint praise: Meet the Robinsons is really a great film that I unilaterally recommend.

Continue reading: Meet the Robinsons Review

Beer League Review


Weak
If you're unfamiliar with Artie Lange, he's part of Howard Stern's gang of cronies, the guys who write his jokes and make wisecracks from the peanut gallery. That qualifies you to write, produce, and star in a movie that is, let's face it, basically about yourself: a self-proclaimed fat, "funny" guy named Artie who lives at home, has no job, and plays softball mostly while drunk.

Beer League is a loose collection of threads of plot surrounding Artie: His baseball team is so rowdy they are threatened with expulsion from the league unless they can beat their arch-rivals. He's got girl trouble with "used goods" Linda (the impossibly gorgeous Cara Buono). And he's throwing a bachelor party, which is bound to get him into trouble.

Continue reading: Beer League Review

Toy Story 2 Review


Excellent
Previously destined for a straight-to-video release, the Toys are back in the long-awaited sequel to 1995's massively successful Toy Story.

Thank God! Almost as good as the original, Toy Story 2 is an unabashed crowd-pleaser to children and adults. With enough (non-offensive) adult humor and plenty of good-natured kid stuff, this film had our tiny audience in stitches from start to finish.

Continue reading: Toy Story 2 Review

JFK Review


Essential
I get a lot of flack for proclaiming JFK as one of my favorite films ever, but I'm sticking by it. Sure it's long and includes some dubious conjecture, but JFK is one powerful movie, even if you don't believe a word of it in the end. And it's hard to find nothing in the film which you can grab on to.

So give it a chance. November 22, 2003 marks the 40th anniversary of the death of John F. Kennedy, and there's no better way to look back than with a screening of Oliver Stone's thoughtful and exhaustive study of Jim Garrison's (Kevin Costner) investigation into the president's assassination. Stone's masterpiece has now been reissued on DVD in Stone's director's cut, with 17 minutes of restored footage that Camelot enthusiasts should find rewarding -- the same version as the previous DVD release. (Included among the restored scenes is a long passage about George DeMohrenschildt, a Nazi sympathizer who befriended Lee Harvey Oswald (Gary Oldman) and later betrayed him to the Warren Commission. There's more about Bill Broussard's (Michael Rooker) defection, and a scene of Garrison later being accosted in an airport. Extra witnesses are paraded through the final courtroom scene, and, most peculiarly, there's a restored sequence of Garrison's appearance on the gaudy The Jerry Johnson Show, with John Larroquette as the smarmy host.)

Continue reading: JFK Review

Scream 2 Review


OK
Two Words: Flying Camel.

Ha! I got you. You thought it would be "Good Sequel," didn't you? The reason I say Flying Camel is because, in an ordinary universe, Flying Camels do exist (although they do in Wim Wenders' The End of Violence). In the ordinary universe, good sequels are just as rare.

Continue reading: Scream 2 Review

Chicago Cab Review


Weak
Nothing inspires more horror in me than the words "Based on the play..." and sure enough, Chicago Cab has that based-on-theatre feel to it. Day-in-the-life-of-a-cab-driver has been done before (never successfully, though), and this star-packed film does nothing to reverse that trend.

Continue reading: Chicago Cab Review

Time Code Review


OK
Sorry, Mr. Lynch, your place at the head of the avant-garde experimental filmmaker table has been given away. Messrs. Jarmusch, Toback, Korine, and Cronenberg, you'll all be eating outside. Mike Figgis will be taking over for all of you, and don't come back.

Figgis, who earned a Best Director Oscar nomination for Leaving Las Vegas in 1996, appears to have gone a little funny in the head last year with his inexplicable and nearly dialogue-free The Loss of Sexual Innocence. Now he's fully gone off the deep end with what may be the most ambitious experiment ever: Time Code.

Continue reading: Time Code Review

Time Code Review


OK

Perhaps the most extraordinary experimental film ever unleashed outside the confines of the art house circuit, "Time Code" is a confident and daring attempt by director Mike Figgis ("Leaving Las Vegas," "The Loss of Sexual Innocence") to plant his flag on the barely-explored shores of 21st Century filmmaking.

Shooting on hand-held digital video in four continuous takes all running at once, Figgis splits the screen in quadrants like a security camera monitor and fiddles with the audio to draw your eye where he wants it. Then like an orchestral conductor, he unspools a precisely synchronized 93 minutes of raw, unedited, real-time footage, tracking multiple, largely-improvised narratives about a sampling of misanthropic, self-absorbed Hollywood denizens.

Packed with talented, name stars starving for something original to chew on, "Time Code's" has several stories -- some tense and emotional, others cynical and facetious -- unfolding simultaneously and often crossing paths.

Continue reading: Time Code Review

Laurie Metcalf

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