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Anita Ekberg, Star Of "La Dolce Vita" Dies Aged 83


Anita Ekberg Lauren Bacall John Wayne

Anita Ekberg, the actress who danced in the Fontana di Trevi in Federico Fellini’s film “La Dolce Vita,” has died at the age of 83. Ekberg had been hospitalized recently after a series of illnesses, her lawyer, Patrizia Ubaldi told the Associated Press. She died at the Rocca di Papa Hospital in Rome.

Continue reading: Anita Ekberg, Star Of "La Dolce Vita" Dies Aged 83

FIT Museum To Celebrate Lauren Bacall With Exhibition Celebrating Her Style Through The Years


Lauren Bacall

Lauren Bacall, the Hollywood icon, who died this week at the age of 89, will receive a glamorous, comprehensive exhibition of her style through the years. Next spring, The Museum at FIT, in cooperation with students learning how to curate, will put on focused on five designers who helped define Bacall's personal style, her classic, seductive looks and subtle masculine energy. 

Lauren Bacall
Bacall defined a unique, smart and sensual style in the mid-20th century.

The exhibition will Bacall’s fashion favorites – Ives Saint Laurent and Norman Norell gowns, the kind of pieces the actress wore with grace and confidence.

Continue reading: FIT Museum To Celebrate Lauren Bacall With Exhibition Celebrating Her Style Through The Years

March 24, 1997: The Day Lauren Bacall Was Robbed Of An Oscar


Lauren Bacall Juliette Binoche

After over 40-plus years as one of Hollywood's leading ladies, Lauren Bacall - who died on Tuesday (August 12, 2014) aged 89 - had to wait until 1997 for her first Oscar nomination. The 72-year-old had turned in a tour-de-force performance in Barbra Streisand's The Mirror Has Two Faces - out-acting the screen legend herself, as well as Jeff Bridges and Pierce Brosnan.

Lauren BacallThe Inimitable Lauren Bacall [Getty/1954]

Bacall was considered a shoo-in to win the Academy Award (think Daniel Day-Lewis for Lincoln) after winning best supporting actress at the Golden Globes and Screen Actors Guild Awards, but things didn't go to plan on the night. As has happened so often since, the Academy picked its movie of the year - The English Patient - and ran with it, dishing out awards for what seemed like the entire cast. Though what on paper appeared a mere formality became one of the biggest shocks in Oscars history - the French actress Juliette Binoche winning best supporting actress for Anthony Minghella's romantic drama. Bacall's attempt at "I'm happy for you" applause became one of the most talked about moments of the ceremony. 

Continue reading: March 24, 1997: The Day Lauren Bacall Was Robbed Of An Oscar

Lauren Bacall, An Icon For Powerful Women In The Industry, Has Died At 89


Lauren Bacall Humphrey Bogart

More tragic news from Hollywood this week – actress Lauren Bacall has died at the age of 89. Bacall is one of the most recognized faces from the golden age of Hollywood and an actress hailed for her grace, wit and stunning looks. The actress’s own presence and sense of self never failed to match the celebrity of Humphrey Bogart, to whom she was married until his death in 1957. The Bogart estate announced that Bacall had died Tuesday at her apartment in the Dakota, according to the New York Daily News.

Lauren Bacall
Bacall was one of the icons of her generation and Hollywood in general.

Tall, slender and confident, Bacall was always one to grab the attention of those around her. But it was her tough, no nonsense attitude, that friends and colleagues remember her by. Having grown up in the Bronx, Bacall became the “dame-est of the dames” as actor John Cusack put it in his tweet on Tuesday.

Continue reading: Lauren Bacall, An Icon For Powerful Women In The Industry, Has Died At 89

After the tragic loss of American screen and stage actress Lauren Bacall, fans leave flowers and momentos on her Hollywood walk of fame star - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 12th August 2014

Lauren Bacall and Fame Star
Lauren Bacall and Fame Star
Lauren Bacall and Fame Star
Lauren Bacall and Fame Star
Lauren Bacall and Fame Star
Lauren Bacall and Fame Star

Lauren Bacall - Lauren Bacall attends press conference for 'The Walker' during the 57th Berlin International Film Festival - Berlin, Germany - Tuesday 13th February 2007

Lauren Bacall
Lauren Bacall
Lauren Bacall
Lauren Bacall
Lauren Bacall
Lauren Bacall

Lauren Bacall Wednesday 18th November 2009 arriving at LAX airport with her dog to board a flight Los Angeles, California

Lauren Bacall
Lauren Bacall
Lauren Bacall
Lauren Bacall
Lauren Bacall
Lauren Bacall

Roger Corman and Lauren Bacall - Roger Corman, Lauren Bacall and Gordon Willis Hollywood, California - Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences' 2009 Governors Awards Gala - Arrivals held at Grand Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland Center Saturday 14th November 2009

Roger Corman and Lauren Bacall
Roger Corman and Lauren Bacall
Roger Corman

Lauren Bacall - at Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences Hollywood, California

Lauren Bacall
Lauren Bacall
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Tom Ford and Lauren Bacall
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Lauren Bacall

The Walker Review


Good
There are several things being chatted and whispered about in the backrooms, parlors and bars of Paul Shrader's Washington but nothing distinctive. The closest to a controversy comes when a few specific so-and-sos ruminate about a possible conspiracy involving the vice president and a dead escort. These events, however, doesn't seem to matter much in the grand scheme of things, and that is both a good thing and a bad thing in Shrader's latest film, The Walker.

As is explained by a pair of FBI agents, a walker is the title given to men who escort women of great importance (and elderly age) from here to there in the ladies' leisurely days of lunching and shopping. Like other men in his profession, Carter Page III (Woody Harrelson) has the breeding and education that the career demands and his taste in fashion and furniture is impeccable; he's also a flagrant homosexual. He shuttles away from his one-day-a-week job as a real estate insider to meet up with the likes of Lynn Locklear (Kristin Scott Thomas), the wife of a senator, and Abigail Delorean (Lily Tomlin), the wife of Washington's most powerful fixer (Ned Beatty).

Continue reading: The Walker Review

Dark Passage Review


Very Good
A minor classic in the noir genre, Dark Passage is nonetheless too simplistic and too unbelievable to make much of an impression. Bogart is typically great as a falsely-accused prison escapee searching for his wife's real killer, while Bacall is also good as the woman who inexplicably helps him out. The gimmick? Bogie gets plastic surgery to become Bogie -- and he doesn't appear on camera for nearly an hour until the bandages are off. Also of note: Stephen King appears to have borrowed large chunks of Dark Passage for his novella The Shawshank Redemption.

The Line King: The Al Hirschfeld Story Review


Very Good
Al Hirschfeld is as much an icon of American entertainment as Walt Disney. His line-art caricatures are legendary, and his body of work would crush your foundation. Hirschfeld died in 2003 at the age of 99, and his legacy is dutifully recorded in this loving documentary, which features long stretches of interviews with the then-93-year-old artist, endless shots of his collected works, and commentary from his contemporaries.

The world knows Hirschfeld from his portraiture, but The Line King reveals a lot more of the man, from his interest in Eastern artistic styles, travels to communist Russia, political cartooning, and more. His impact on the creation of some of Broadway's most classic plays is duly noted, as well. One of the most interesting things in the film -- or that I've heard in my life, really -- involves the fact that the Pentagon uses the hidden "NINAs" (his daughter) in Hirschfeld's drawings to train pilots how to look for camouflaged targets.

Continue reading: The Line King: The Al Hirschfeld Story Review

Birth Review


Bad
Jonathan Glazer's stylish debut Sexy Beast stood out for the uncharacteristically explosive and vicious performance the director coaxed out of stately Ben Kingsley. Evidence of any such energy all but escapes Birth, Glazer's anticipated follow-up to his kinetic gangster picture. A plodding and pretentious thriller, this beyond-the-grave affair ends up being too art-house for the mainstream crowd and too mainstream for the art-house crowd. Loosely translated, that means it doesn't work for anyone.

Birth hangs its hat on a delicate premise that demands kid gloves if it seriously hopes to sustain the already shaky credibility. An elegant transition of life forces starts the film. Physician Sean dies while jogging. Simultaneously, a baby is born. Fast forward 10 years, where a cave-eyed child coincidentally named Sean (Cameron Bright) claims to Upper West Side basket case Anna (Nicole Kidman) that he is her reincarnated ex-husband. Anna's humorless fiancée (Danny Huston) scoffs at the idea. Her mother (a neglected Lauren Bacall) displays indifference. ("I never liked Sean, anyway," she articulates.) But Anna's not so quick to write the boy off.

Continue reading: Birth Review

Manderlay Review


Very Good
You should be very suspicious of anyone who owns Dogville and no other Lars Von Trier film. It's a ruse, a hoax, and a ploy, a way for that pretentious NYU philosophy major with the vintage Members Only jacket to impress that really cool, semi-punk girl with the cool Husker Du pin and prove to her that his brain is much more worthy than anyone else's. To like Dogville alone is to like the idea of Von Trier and to think you're special for picking up all the philosophical ideas behind it, along with name-checking Brecht. You're not, and Breaking the Waves, Dancer in the Dark, and The Element of Crime are much better films. Expect a copy of his latest film, Manderlay, Dogville's sequel, to be placed on that NYU kid's DVD shelf right next to Dogville, allowing for more philosophical meandering but this time, on racism and white, liberal guilt.

Picking up after the violent ending of Dogville, we catch up with Grace Mulligan (Bryce Dallas Howard, replacing Nicole Kidman) as her and her father (Willem Dafoe, replacing James Caan) end up at a small southern plantation named Manderlay. A young, black woman runs up to the car, yelling and crying about how they are going to whip Timothy (Isaach De Bankole). Stopping the car immediately and running onto the plantation, against her father's wishes, she finds that Manderlay is a plantation that still employs slavery. Seeing this as a grave injustice, Grace takes a few of her father's goons and starts running the plantation more like a business, making the white owners work while the slaves are given freedom to go about as they please, receiving shares in the crop's revenue. The slaves are led by Willhelm (Danny Glover), an older man who used to serve Mam (Lauren Bacall), the head of the plantation. As things progress, a dust storm, a child's death, the execution of an elder and Grace's slowly unraveling lust for Timothy start raising the issue that maybe things were better as they were.

Continue reading: Manderlay Review

Dogville Review


Good
Evoking the age-old parable of human nature pillaging the likes of total goodness when it strangely pops up in town, Lars von Trier's much-anticipated Dogville has such intense extremes of useful experimentation and annoyingly repetitive patronization (a tendency throughout his respectable filmography) that the sum of its parts comes out evenly average.

Predictability reigns for much of the film, because we've seen the story far too often before. A stranger comes to town where the residents are skeptical of outsiders. She proceeds to go out of her way to ingratiate herself, they finally accept her, and then show their true colors against her of what they fear to inflict on one another due to extended co-habitation. The dysfunction turns into a gang of all versus one, regardless of any normal sense of morality, which they are able to slowly rationalize. On the one hand, the unhurried process through which this evolves respects the fact that nobody changes actions or views over night. But because we know it's going to happen, the path to getting there feels arduous.

Continue reading: Dogville Review

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Howl's Moving Castle Movie Review

Howl's Moving Castle Movie Review

Similar to Princess Mononoke and Spirited Away, Hayao Miyazaki's Howl's Moving Castle is a sumptuously...

Birth Movie Review

Birth Movie Review

Jonathan Glazer's stylish debut Sexy Beast stood out for the uncharacteristically explosive and vicious performance...

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