Laurel Holloman

Laurel Holloman

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The 2014 Dinah Shore Weekend, Club Skirts Day 3 "Pool Party"

Laurel Holloman - The 2014 Dinah Shore Weekend, Club Skirts Day 3"Pool Party" - Palm Spings, California, United States - Sunday 6th April 2014

LAUREL HOLLOMAN
LAUREL HOLLOMAN
LAUREL HOLLOMAN
LAUREL HOLLOMAN
LAUREL HOLLOMAN

The 2014 Dinah Shore Weekend, Club Skirts "Black Party"

Laurel Holloman, Leisha Hailey and KATE MOENNIG - The 2014 Dinah Shore Weekend, Club Skirts "Black Party" - Palm Spings, California, United States - Saturday 5th April 2014

LAUREL HOLLOMAN
Laurel Holloman
LAUREL HOLLOMAN, LEISHA HAILEY and KATE MOENNIG
LAUREL HOLLOMAN
LAUREL HOLLOMAN, LEISHA HAILEY, Mariah Hanson Founder of Club Skirts and KATE MOENNIG

L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center's 42nd Anniversary Vanguard Awards

Laurel Holloman - L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center's 42nd Anniversary Vanguard Awards Gala At Westin Bonaventure Hotel - Inside - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 9th November 2013

Laurel Holloman and LuAnn Boylan
Laurel Holloman
Laurel Holloman
Ron, Laurel Holloman and Uzo Aduba
Ron, Laurel Holloman and Uzo Aduba

Showtime Bids Adieu To the Ladies of The L Word held at Cafe La Boheme

Rose Rollins, Daniela Sea, Laurel Holloman and Mia Kirshner - Rose Rollins, Mia Kirshner, Daniela Sea, Katherine Moennig, Laurel Holloman, Ilene Chaiken, Marlee Matlin West Hollywood, California - Showtime Bids Adieu To the Ladies of The L Word held at Cafe La Boheme Tuesday 3rd March 2009

Showtime Bids Adieu To the Ladies of The L Word held at Cafe La Boheme

Laurel Holloman and Rose Rollins - Laurel Holloman, Rose Rollins West Hollywood, California - Showtime Bids Adieu To the Ladies of The L Word held at Cafe La Boheme Tuesday 3rd March 2009

Laurel Holloman and Rose Rollins

Tumbleweeds Review


Weak
Mother and daughter pack up from hillbilly land and head for California: Does it sound like we've been over this ground before?

The similarities between Tumbleweeds and Anywhere But Here (the corpse of which is not even cold) are astonishing. In Tumbleweeds, Mom Mary Jo (McTeer) is a put-upon single mother; daughter Ava (Brown) is brash and headstrong. The two drive to California, intent on "starting over," -- in the case of Tumbleweeds, an escape from physical abuse, or at least the threat of it. Anywhere But Here: same story, sans the abuse.

Continue reading: Tumbleweeds Review

Chapter Zero Review


Weak
Adam Lazarus's life is so sad -- gasp! -- that his first novel was rejected by one publisher! Can you believe it!? He's so despondent he throws the manuscript away along with his computer.

Putting aside the absurdity of the scenario that a writer would abandon his craft based on a single rejection for his first major work, Chapter Zero ultimately reveals itself as a pleasant enough -- though ultimately trivial -- little comedy.

Continue reading: Chapter Zero Review

Lush Review


Weak
Never mind the spooky box cover image and creepy tagline, Lush is hardly the gothic melodrama its promotion tries to sell. And that's probably for the better, because as a dark thriller this movie isn't going to win many fans.

The story follows a washed-up golfer (Campbell Scott), fresh out of prison, who returns to his home town of New Orleans to get a fresh start. Soon enough he's wrapped up with a wealthy-yet-drunk lawyer (Jared Harris), who takes him from one socialite party to the next. But then the lawyer turns up missing, and most people suspect our ex-con hero has done away with him.

Continue reading: Lush Review

Cherry Review


Weak
Worse romantic comedies have been produced, for sure. Cherry is an unfortunately-titled love affair with twentysomething model-cum-actress Shalom Harlow as a virgin who (a) was left at the altar at age 17, and (b) now wants a baby. Her search for a man despite not even knowing how to kiss leads her to a professional clown and her OB/GYN. Sounds just like life, no? At least Harlow is cute enough to watch and smart enough to not make you want to rip your ears off.

The Rising Place Review


Weak
If you're a fan of movies like The Notebook or Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood, The Rising Place is for you. Despite the vaguely naughty name, this is actually an earnest and heartfelt period piece set in the Old South, involving pregnancy out of wedlock, civil rights, and lots and lots of headstrong women. Laurel Holloman -- a cross between Mary Louise Parker and Mary McCormack -- owns this show the best she can, but my if it isn't staid and predictable.

Prefontaine Review


OK
Slightly less-realized than late-to-the-race competitor Without Limits, Prefontaine is still a reasonably good retelling of the life story of Steve Prefontaine, the opinionated and brash distance runner who choked during the Munich Olympics and died in an untimely car crash before he could redeem himself in Montreal in 1976. Prefontaine focuses more on tertiary characters than Limits, some of which are interesting and some of which are not, but really gets annoying for its mock-documentary style. Namely, the actors are "aged" and interviewed in the present day, talking about Pre, complete with subtitles identifying who they are. The problem, of course, is that it's all fake -- and the last thing you want to feel when watching a biography is that you're being lied to.

Tumbleweeds Review


OK

Mary Jo Walker is the kind of woman all too common on the American sociological landscape. Pushing 40 years old, her entire adult life has been spent rushing into and running away from abusive relationships. Brazen on the outside, insecure inside, she's never been without a man. The thought has never even occurred to her.

But it has occurred to Ava, her brassy 12-year-old daughter. After an ugly fight with her most recent husband, Southern-fried Mary Jo packs a suitcase, grabs Ava by arm and hauls butt for Missouri. "What are we gonna do there?" Ava smarts off. "Somebody else you want to marry?"

An obliging, but not easy, character drama about discovering self-esteem and independence, "Tumbleweeds" quickly gives the impression this shack-up-and-run lifestyle is habitual for this hereditary duo, played with remarkable, unfeigned angst, desperation, devotion, animosity and irony by Broadway transplants Janet McTeer and Kimberly J. Brown. They don't even own anything that can't fit in the back of Mary Jo's jalopy of a GTO.

Continue reading: Tumbleweeds Review

Laurel Holloman

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