Laura Fraser

Laura Fraser

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British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Los Angeles TV Tea Party 2014

Laura Fraser - British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Los Angeles TV Tea Party 2014 at SLS Hotel - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 23rd August 2014

Laura Fraser
Laura Fraser

British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Los Angeles TV Tea

Laura Fraser - British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Los Angeles TV Tea presented by BBC and Jaguar at SLS Hotel - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 23rd August 2014

Laura Fraser
Laura Fraser
Laura Fraser
Laura Fraser
Laura Fraser

The 20th Annual Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Awards

Laura Fraser - The 20th Annual Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Awards held at The Shrine Auditorium - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 18th January 2014

The 20th Annual Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Awards

Laura Fraser - The 20th Annual Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Awards held at The Shrine Auditorium - Press Room - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 18th January 2014

Laura Fraser

20th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards - Press Room

Patrick Sane, Matthew T. Metzler, Lavell Crawford, Bryan Cranston, Steven Michael Quezada, Anna Gunn, Tait Fletcher, Aaron Paul, Dean Norris, RJ Mitte and Laura Fraser - Celebrities pose with awards at 20th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards press room at The Shrine Auditorium. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 18th January 2014

Patrick Sane, Matthew T. Metzler, Lavell Crawford, Bryan Cranston, Steven Michael Quezada, Anna Gunn, Tait Fletcher, Aaron Paul, Dean Norris, RJ Mitte and Laura Fraser

Cuckoo Trailer


Penny is a young medical researcher who works in a lab with her boss Professor Greengrass and his assistant Simone , as days go by Penny begins to question if this is the job she really wants to do and also takes a look at her increasingly lonely homelife. When Penny starts to hear the voice of her partner in the house - even though he's not actually in the building - Penny thinks she might be going crazy.

Continue: Cuckoo Trailer

The Boys Are Back Review


OK
Since it's based on true events (from the life of journalist Simon Carr), this story is rather un-cinematic, lacking a driving narrative. But it's a telling exploration of relationships, relying on a superb cast to keep us engaged.

Sports writer Joe (Owen) is left in a daze when his wife Katy (Fraser) dies suddenly, leaving him to care for 6-year-old Artie (McAnulty). Since he has spent much of Artie's life travelling with his job, they have a lot of bonding to do, so they head out on a road trip. Then Joe's 14-year-old son Harry (MacKay) arrives from England to get to know his dad. With their unconventional family arrangement, these three cause a bit of concern with Joe's in-laws (Blake and Haywood) and a neighbour (Booth).

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Whatever Happened to Harold Smith? Review


Good
This strange and compelling Brit-flick has two disparate tales that surprisingly intersect when the father (Harold Smith) of one boy manages to stop the pacemakers of three elderly audience members during his attempt at mentally stopping the watches in the crowd. Whoops. In his defense is a scientist he refutes such mental powers, and his daughter and the Smith boy turn out to be semi-secret lovers. Well-acted and full of droll humor, and worth a look if you can find it for rent or on cable. Unfortunately, it has perhaps the worst movie title I've ever heard (and it makes me not want to see it again, just thinking about that title!)... except, of course, for this movie.

Den Of Lions Review


Grim
I'll sit through almost anything that has Bob Hoskins in it, but lately I've come to realize that old reliable Bob hasn't made a great movie in nearly 20 years. Hell, Hoskins was in Maid in Manhattan! It's become so bad that studios are reissuing his finer work, like Mona Lisa and The Long Good Friday on DVD. Den of Lions is a predictable euro-terrorism-espionage thriller, the likes of which have been being pumped out en masse in the last ten years. The twist this time involves a Hungarian double agent, the FBI, and Stephen Dorff. Woo!

Forgive and Forget Review


Grim
Angst-ridden twentysomething Brits struggle with life, love, and homosexuality -- yet again -- in Forgive and Forget, wherein two best friends become torn apart because one of them gets a little close to his girlfriend, spending more time with her and less time with his mate.

It's happened before, sure, but this time the friend causing all the trouble turns out to be gay, and of course he's madly in love with his pal. They fight, they make up, they fight some more, and all the while no one realizes our misunderstood hero is in the closet.

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Titus Review


Grim
Titus Andronicus: One mean bastard.

Okay... I'm kinda lost. Who the hell is Titus Andronicus, you may ask? Well, Titus A. was the first play by Bill Shakespeare, about the usual themes of the mighty Bill: Revenge, hatred, a little bit of incest, honor, mental loopiness, and damn good human mincemeat pie. The hard part of trying to bring Shakespeare to life through either film or stage production is trying to cut through all of the pompous attitude of the director and making an understandable, comprehensible piece of narrative.

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A Knight's Tale Review


Good
I was initially skeptical, to say the least, to hear the premise of A Knight's Tale, which, for the uninitiated, is thus: Classic tale of squires and swords is set to a loud, classic rock score. Sounds like Rocky Horror at best, Evita at worst. Fortunately, A Knight's Tale comes in on the high side of would-be rock operas (would-be because there's not actually any singing in the movie, just a lot of dancing; on the high side because they usually suck) thanks to its odd mixture of silly fun with bone-crushing action scenes.

How do you mix a 1400s tale of jousting and swordplay with a load of rock music? Very carefully. It all starts as a crowd chants the opening monologue to "We Will Rock You" at the lists of a small jousting tournament, while our squire hero Will (Heath Ledger) finds that his master, a knight on the verge of winning the tourney, has just died. In a fit of passion, he straps on his master's armor and rides into the arena, winning the tournament for he and his two co-squire friends (Mark Addy and Alan Tudyk). Thrilled with the victory, Will opts not to take the money and split, but instead assumes the identity of a phony knight, rockin' and joustin' his way across France en route to "The World Championships" of jousting in London.

Continue reading: A Knight's Tale Review

Whatever Happened to Harold Smith? Review


Good
This strange and compelling Brit-flick has two disparate tales that surprisingly intersect when the father (Harold Smith) of one boy manages to stop the pacemakers of three elderly audience members during his attempt at mentally stopping the watches in the crowd. Whoops. In his defense is a scientist he refutes such mental powers, and his daughter and the Smith boy turn out to be semi-secret lovers. Well-acted and full of droll humor, and worth a look if you can find it for rent or on cable. Unfortunately, it has perhaps the worst movie title I've ever heard (and it makes me not want to see it again, just thinking about that title!)... except, of course, for this movie.

Cousin Bette Review


OK
Passable ripoff of Dangerous Liaisons. Tries to be funny (as black comedy) but largely fails, mainly because Jessica Lange is about as comedic as leukemia.

Left Luggage Review


Weak
Topol, where have you been since Fiddler on the Roof? Ah, the triumphant hero returns in a small role in Left Luggage, an overly sentimental (and manipulative) film about the plight of Hasidic Jews in 1970s Antwerp. Laura Fraser (the Scottish answer to Eliza Dushku) plays a modern Jewish girl with modern sensibilities (she wears pants) who takes a nanny job with a Hasidic family in order to pay the rent. So backwards, the family's father (Jeroen Krabbé, who also directed the film) isn't even impressed when she gets their four year old to say his first word -- instead saying he should be asking the questions of the Seder instead of saying "Quack." Meanwhile, Laura's father (Maximilian Schell) is digging up Antwerp in search of his lost bags from WWII. And we are asked to sympathize with all of these cases, unsuccessfully. Based on the novel Twee Koffers Vol.
Laura Fraser

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