Larenz Tate

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World Premiere screening for documentary 'Unity'

Larenz Tate - World Premiere screening for documentary 'Unity' at Director's Guild of America - Arrivals at Director's Guild of America - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 24th June 2015

Larenz Tate
Larenz Tate
Larenz Tate
Larenz Tate

World Premiere of 'Unity'

Larenz Tate - World Premiere of 'Unity' at DGA Theater - Arrivals at DGA Theater - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 24th June 2015

Larenz Tate
Larenz Tate
Larenz Tate
Larenz Tate

2015 NBC Upfront Presentation

Larenz Tate - A host of stars were snapped as they arrived to Radio City Music Hall for the NBC 2015 Upfront event in New York City, New York, United States - Monday 11th May 2015

Video - 'Chicago Fire' Stars Eamonn Walker And Taylor Kinney Hit The 2015 NBC Upfront - Part 5


'Chicago Fire' stars Eamonn Walker and Taylor Kinney led arrivals at the 2015 NBC Upfront Presentation held at Radio City Music Hall in New York. The series began in 2012 and follows a group of firefighters in their day to day life.

Continue: Video - 'Chicago Fire' Stars Eamonn Walker And Taylor Kinney Hit The 2015 NBC Upfront - Part 5

"Brotherly Love" LA Premiere

Tyrese Gibson and Larenz Tate - A variety of stars were photographed as they attended the premiere of "Brotherly Love" which was held at the Silver Screen Theater at the Pacific Design Center in West Hollywood, California, United States - Tuesday 14th April 2015

46th NAACP Image Awards

Larenz Tate - A host of stars were photographed on arrival to the 46th NAACP Image Awards which were presented by TV One and held at the Pasadena Civic Center in Pasadena, California, United States - Friday 6th February 2015

Crash (2005) Review


Excellent
In Crash, a simple car accident forms an unyielding foundation for the complex exploration of race and prejudice. Thoroughly repulsive throughout, but incredibly thought provoking long after, Paul Haggis' breathtaking directorial debut succeeds in bringing to the forefront the behaviors that many people keep under their skin. And by thrusting these attitudes toward us with a highly calculated, reckless abandon, Haggis puts racism on the highest pedestal for our review.

There is no better place for this examination than the culturally diverse melting pot of modern-day Los Angeles. In just over 24 hours, Crash brings together people from all walks of life. Two philosophizing black men (Ludacris and Larenz Tate) steal the expensive SUV belonging to the white, L.A. District Attorney (Brendan Fraser), and his high-strung wife (Sandra Bullock). A similar vehicle belonging to a wealthy black television director (Terrence Howard) and his wife (Thandie Newton) is later pulled over by a racist cop (Matt Dillon) and his partner (Ryan Phillippe). Soon, many of these people get mixed up with a Latino locksmith (Michael Peña), a Persian storekeeper (Shaun Toub), and two ethnically diverse, dating police detectives (Don Cheadle and Jennifer Esposito).

Continue reading: Crash (2005) Review

Menace II Society Review


Good
Life in the hood is pretty bleak, but if you're Caine or O-Dog, it doesn't get much worse than this. The Hughes brothers' widely hailed (and often imitated) ode to life in South Central L.A. is morose and overflowing with violence -- to the point where you'll get blown away just for making a comment about someone's mother. Our hero Caine wants to get away from it all -- but his efforts don't amount for much. In the end, Menace isn't much more than a tragedy about street life -- but it never really makes a point. If this world is so bad, why glamorize it so much? To be sure, it's in an influential and powerful story -- but it comes off as considerably more shallow than the reality it claims to portray.

Crash (2004) Review


Excellent
In Crash, a simple car accident forms an unyielding foundation for the complex exploration of race and prejudice. Thoroughly repulsive throughout, but incredibly thought provoking long after, Paul Haggis' breathtaking directorial debut succeeds in bringing to the forefront the behaviors that many people keep under their skin. And by thrusting these attitudes toward us with a highly calculated, reckless abandon, Haggis puts racism on the highest pedestal for our review.

There is no better place for this examination than the culturally diverse melting pot of modern-day Los Angeles. In just over 24 hours, Crash brings together people from all walks of life. Two philosophizing black men (Ludacris and Larenz Tate) steal the expensive SUV belonging to the white, L.A. District Attorney (Brendan Fraser), and his high-strung wife (Sandra Bullock). A similar vehicle belonging to a wealthy black television director (Terrence Howard) and his wife (Thandie Newton) is later pulled over by a racist cop (Matt Dillon) and his partner (Ryan Phillippe). Soon, many of these people get mixed up with a Latino locksmith (Michael Peña), a Persian storekeeper (Shaun Toub), and two ethnically diverse, dating police detectives (Don Cheadle and Jennifer Esposito).

Continue reading: Crash (2004) Review

Why Do Fools Fall In Love? Review


Weak
Or, a better question: Why would anyone think a movie about a battle over music royalties by three vengeful women, starring Little Richard as himself, would be any good?

The Postman (1997) Review


Terrible
When picking a protagonist for a movie as massively pulp as this filmwas, a good idea is to make a character that the audience can have some connection with. In order to do this, it might be a good idea to not associate said character with anything that alienates the character. In other words: if you want to choose your basic pulp protagonist, please do not choose their occupation as something that has become synonymous with psychopath.

Yes, I'm talking about The Postman. Post-millennial, post-apocalyptic, and post-intelligence, The Postman is the story of patriotism being reborn (ironically, the patriotism is in opposition to nationalism, which is the flip side of the patriotic coin) in the form of Postal Carriers. OK. It's dumb. The United States has become defunct, a racist psychopath holds all of the power, and the first thing that the new US Government is trying to get working is the mail.

Continue reading: The Postman (1997) Review

Biker Boyz Review


Grim
Ever since I saw my first Ruff Ryders video on MTV that featured hip hop stars like DMX and Eve riding tricked-out motorcycles, I knew that a black biker trend was on its way. Then when I saw a group of black bikers hanging out on the side of the highway in North Carolina over Christmas, I knew it had arrived.

So it was really only a matter of time that a movie like Biker Boyz would be released, ripe to cash in on the fad of glammed-up, nitrous-powered high-speed bike racing. And judging from all the ads for Biker Boyz, it seemed like the motorbike fans would get just what they wanted: a Fast and the Furious on two wheels--plenty of explosions, crashes, tits, and dumb as a rock dialogue. I expected it so much that I was actually looking forward to that kind of experience with this film, but that's far from what the movie is.

Continue reading: Biker Boyz Review

A Man Apart Review


Weak
After muscling his way through films like The Fast and the Furious and XXX, Vin Diesel has quickly become the new poster boy for the action genre. Along with this new title, he has developed a cult following of obsessed Diesel fanatics who live to see him blow things up. However, those expecting A Man Apart to be a wild romp like XXX could be disappointed. While Man does have it's share of exploding cars and gun battles, the film is much more subdued than his previous works.

Diesel plays seasoned DEA agent Sean Vetter, who is part of a group of agents that have spent the last seven years assigned to halt the Mexican drug pipeline headed by kingpin Memo Lucero (Geno Silva). Despite the eventual success Vetter and his partner Demetrius (Larenz Tate) have at putting Lucero behind bars, they soon face a greater challenge when a hit meant for Vetter is botched and his wife is killed. This lights a raging fire under Vetter's ass, and he is now hell-bent on avenging his wife's murder and putting an end to the newest cartel headed by a man named Diablo.

Continue reading: A Man Apart Review

Crash Review


OK
A meditation on the often unacknowledged undercurrentsof racism in everyday American city life, "Crash" has the kindof broad appeal that can draw large audiences and the kind of lingeringemotional potency that can lead to serious soul-searching.

An impressive ensemble cast lends strong character to acultural cross-section of Los Angeles denizens who are connected to eachother through crime, corruption, obligation, indignation and chance overa two-day period. The most powerful storyline features Matt Dillon andRyan Phillippe as beat cops -- one jaded and abusive, the other fresh andidealistic -- who pull over and harass (much to Phillippe's dismay) a blackyuppie couple (Terrence Howard and Thandie Newton) because the SUV they'redriving vaguely fits the description of a carjacked vehicle.

Within 24 hours, these characters all cross paths againin separate incidents of incredibly high tension that challenge both theprejudices that have formed between them and the conclusions we've beenled to as an audience.

Although they do not meet again, similarly potent table-turningand judgment-testing events occur in the lives of the actual carjackers(Larenz Tate and rapper Ludacris, whose character is ironically obsessedwith being stereotyped) and their victims, an ambitious district attorneyand his uptight wife (played with depth and conviction by Brendan Fraserand Sandra Bullock).

Continue reading: Crash Review

A Man Apart Review


Grim

In their attempt to make a shoot-'em-up with a soul, ready-to-be-crowned action king Vin Diesel and director F. Gary Gray ("The Negotiator") wind up with a dark and handsome movie -- quite unfortunately titled "A Man Apart" -- that's less than exciting and only superficially deep.

As a DEA bad-ass on the war path against an anonymous drug kingpin who killed his wife -- something you know is coming the minute he stares lovingly into the eyes of a beautiful actress without any name recognition (Jacqueline Obradors) -- Diesel seems to have taken the part so he could dust off some of his emotional range without straying too far from his muscle-rippling, shaved-head, five-o'clock-shadow tough Guy-with-a-capital-G screen persona.

While he does sell his brokenheartedness, with the aid of some beautiful ocean-side sunsets in front of which he despondently holds his head in his hands, Diesel and Gray know that's not what the people pay to see -- so pass the ammo, baby! Several thunderous, chaotic, hard-to-follow shoot-outs are the picture's big set pieces.

Continue reading: A Man Apart Review

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