Lara Flynn Boyle

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'Wayne's World' Reunion

Lara Flynn Boyle - Academy of Motion Picture Arts And Sciences hosts a 'Wayne's World' Reunion at AMPAS Samuel Goldwyn Theater - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Tuesday 23rd April 2013

Lara Flynn Boyle, Penelope Spheeris, Mike Myers, Lorne Michaels, Rob Lowe, Tia Carrere and Dana Carvey
Lara Flynn Boyle, Penelope Spheeris, Mike Myers, Lorne Michaels, Rob Lowe, Tia Carrere and Dana Carvey
Lara Flynn Boyle
Lara Flynn Boyle
Lara Flynn Boyle

Picture - Lara Flynn Boyle Santa Monica, California, Thursday 9th December 2010

Lara Flynn Boyle Thursday 9th December 2010 'Where The Day Takes You' - IFTA Special Screening held At The Aero Theatre Santa Monica, California

Lara Flynn Boyle
Lara Flynn Boyle
Lara Flynn Boyle
Lara Flynn Boyle
Lara Flynn Boyle

Picture - Lara Flynn Boyle and Dermot... Santa Monica, California, Thursday 9th December 2010

Lara Flynn Boyle and Dermot Mulroney - Lara Flynn Boyle and Dermot Mulroney Santa Monica, California - 'Where The Day Takes You' - IFTA Special Screening held At The Aero Theatre Thursday 9th December 2010

Lara Flynn Boyle and Dermot Mulroney
Lara Flynn Boyle and Dermot Mulroney
Lara Flynn Boyle and Dermot Mulroney
Lara Flynn Boyle and Dermot Mulroney
Lara Flynn Boyle and Dermot Mulroney

Twin Peaks: The Complete Series Review


Excellent
X-Files, Heroes, Lost? They all owe their very souls to a short-lived TV series that ran for just two seasons from 1990-1992. You might have heard of it: Twin Peaks.

I'll admit now that I wore an "I killed Laura Palmer" t-shirt thoughout my freshman year of college. Am I embarrassed by that now? Yes, but not as much as you'd think. Twin Peaks was a bona-fide phenomenon, the most subversively popular thing of its day and still a brainy-slash-guilty pleasure with few equals.

Continue reading: Twin Peaks: The Complete Series Review

The Dark Backward Review


Weak
Writer/director Adam Rifkin has had an odd Hollywood career. While he's best known for penning late-'90s kid-friendly fare like Mouse Hunt and the surprisingly dark Small Soldiers, Rifkin has been in the business since the late-'80s and has written and directed everything from a sex comedy spoof (The Invisible Maniac) to a gritty urban crime flick (Night at the Golden Eagle). Despite his wandering interests, all of Rifkin's material has a goofy, edgy side. And he's written (and directed) nothing edgier or kookier than 1991's The Dark Backward.

Rifkin wrote the film when he was 19 and probably had it sitting in his proverbial "back pocket" just waiting for the day he had enough clout and experience to get it made. Judd Nelson (great when playing bizarro characters) stars as Marty Malt, a garbage man who moonlights as a terrible stand up comedian. His pal Gus (the seemingly ubiquitous Bill Paxton -- was he in every quirky '90s flick?) thinks Marty's actually pretty funny, but he's really the only one. Worse than Marty's shtick are his attempts at romancing Rosarita (Lara Flynn Boyle).

Continue reading: The Dark Backward Review

Cannes Man Review


Terrible
The most intriguing part of Cannes Man is virtually unknown director Richard Martini cajoled stars like Johnny Depp and Lara Flynn Boyle to appear in his barely amusing semi-mockumentary. (Editor's note: Another director, Susan Shaprio, recently wrote me to contest Martini's ownership of the film. More as it develops.) The film tells a story of a Jersey punk (Francesco Quinn) who hooks up with a smarmy producer (Seymour Cassel) at Cannes to produce his dream flick, a sci-fi something or other inspired by the works of Troma.

The catch: Cassel's only doing it on a bet that he can turn any old jerk into the toast of the Cannes film festival.

Continue reading: Cannes Man Review

Land of the Blind Review


Unbearable
Not to be bested by Quills and Geoffrey Rush, Land of the Blind had the bright idea to have a scene where Donald Sutherland writes in his own excrement. To do one better, you see the feces plunked down right there in Sutherland's hand. Was this where Sutherland saw his career going? Was he just winding up his pitch with Klute, Don't Look Now, and last year's stellar take on Pride & Prejudice? Was it all really just to get to the point where he could write jibber-jabber about freedom and anarchy in his own poop? Please, Donny, say it ain't so.Sutherland plays Thorne, an imprisoned playwright whose writings have been deemed too inflammatory. The world he lives in is run by a dictator (Tom Hollander) who casts Hollywood actors as news anchors and makes movies that resemble DV versions of Jerry Bruckheimer films. It isn't until a soldier, Joe (Ralph Fiennes), starts listening to Thorne's articulate ramblings that things start happening. Joe busts Thorne out of prison and allows him to exact revenge on the dictator and his wife (a useless Lara Flynn Boyle). The ink is still wet on the new constitution when Thorne becomes a dictator too, sending his friend Joe to the torture chambers for not agreeing with his new regime.Is this what we have stooped to for leftist political films? Robert Edwards' film for one reason or another really thinks it's saying something. It punctuates the cruelty of both the left and the ultra right with equal measures, but it never really shows examples of what is good in either ideology. It highlights the "everyman" as hero, but never sees Fiennes' character as anything besides an ideology that is up for bid. The fact that Edwards fits Joe with a family is absolutely absurd because we don't care about Joe as a character; he is simply there for us to see the effect that politics have on a normal person. It's hollow and criminally indecisive.If anything, you can say that Land of the Blind has excessive, somewhat stylish design production. The castle that the dictator lives in resembles the excessive architecture of some palace in Barcelona. However, this gentle stab at stylizing brings to mind that Edwards was trying to do what none have succeeded at: attempt to follow up Terry Gilliam's Brazil. Not even Gilliam himself, who has made successful, even great films like The Fisher King and Twelve Monkeys, has ever been able to bring his style and politics to such a fantastic torrent. It's possible to see where Edwards' heart might have been in the right place, but his film is too clever, too cold, and too completely self-aware to ever really embrace an everyman like Joe.Hey, Donny, Altman is still making movies, so is Roeg. You have options.

Red Rock West Review


Excellent
With J.T. Walsh, Dennis Hopper, and Lara Flynn Boyle in your desert thriller, it's hard to go wrong, and in his riveting sophomore feature, John Dahl rarely gets tripped up. Why, even Nicolas Cage is in fine form, filling this small movie with wit and a surprising toughness that is refreshing in a world of pulled punches and pointless violence. Tragically, Dahl's output has slowly meandered into irrelevant Hollywood fluff, but you can remember some of his great, early work with this film. It gets a little self-consciously twisty in the last act, but it's all good. This trip through the Wyoming desert (though none of it was shot there) is one you won't soon forget.

Red Meat Review


Grim
They "go to the gym, eat red meat, and talk about girls."

And so this straight-to-DVD-after-five-years-on-the-shelf flick would be dismissed as a pale imitation of In the Company of Men, if only it weren't written and directed by a woman, Allison Burnett. And not only is she a woman, she's the very woman who wrote both Bloodsport III: Forced to Fight and Autumn in New York!*

Continue reading: Red Meat Review

Dead Poets Society Review


Essential
A rare masterwork from Weir and Williams, about the triumphs and tragedies of a prep school teacher (Williams, who does his best work ever here) and his students. The best stories and performances, one of the greatest films of the 1980s and a rare classic that should be treasured.

Afterglow Review


OK
It's hard to keep up with writer-director Alan Rudolph. He's put out almost a movie a year for the past 25 years without shortchanging his personal style and vision, and he keeps getting great casts along with production money from Robert Altman. Yet, he barely registers at the box office, so his movies get limited distribution and short theatrical runs. To see an Alan Rudolph movie you have to go find one.

Rudolph makes movies about characters living out their fates in ways we often understand and see in ourselves. And though his characters come off as real, his movies seem contrived, sliding between the edges of sweet and biting, while running off on tangents that both intrigue and bore. All at the same time. It's a disorientation he relishes: his view of life and how people really behave. With movies like Choose Me, Trixie, Investigating Sex, and The Secret Lives of Dentists, Rudolph's career is a living, breathing embodiment of quixotic variability.

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Susan's Plan Review


Grim
Yea, and the masses cried for a time when John Landis would once again make a passable movie instead of doing direct-to-cable crap like this. Amen.

Continue reading: Susan's Plan Review

Men in Black II Review


OK
In an interview, director Barry Sonnenfeld told me about four years ago that he didn't want to make another Men in Black. The studio wanted it, he said, but he just wasn't interested. What a difference Wild Wild West and Big Trouble will make to your choice of film projects!

And so Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones return to their black suits in one of the most uninspired sequels in recent memory, going through the motions while spouting one-liners en route to encounters with familiar characters at the familiar locations which made the original Men in Black so endearing.

Continue reading: Men in Black II Review

Lara Flynn Boyle

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