Lambert Wilson

Lambert Wilson

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68th Cannes Film Festival - amfAR

Lambert Wilson - 68th Cannes Film Festival - amfAR's Cinema Against Aids Gala at Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc in Antibes at Cannes Film Festival - Cannes, France - Thursday 21st May 2015

Lambert Wilson
Lambert Wilson

68th Cannes Film Festival - amfAR

Eva Herzigova and Lambert Wilson - 68th Cannes Film Festival - A variety of celebrities were photographed as they arrived to amfAR's Cinema Against Aids Gala which was held at the Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc as part of the Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, France - Thursday 21st May 2015

Eva Herzigova
Eva Herzigova
Eva Herzigova
Eva Herzigova
Eva Herzigova

Suite Francaise Trailer


During the Second World War, France was quickly and violently taken over by the German army. Now, under enemy occupation, the residents find themselves having to house and shelter their victorious enemies. Lucille Angellier (Michelle Williams) is one of these people, having to share her house with Commander Bruno von Falk (Matthias Schoenaerts). Despite being on two different sides of the conflict, the two find a strange attraction to one-another, and a romance begins to blossom. But Madame Angellier (Kristin Scott Thomas), Lucille's mother-in-law, distrusts the German officer, leading to a series of events that will test the strength of love and trust, in a time of war.

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The 67th Annual Cannes Film Festival

Lambert Wilson - The 67th Annual Cannes Film Festival - Closing Ceremony - Outside - Cannes, France - Saturday 24th May 2014

The 67th Annual Cannes Film Festival

Lambert Wilson - The 67th Annual Cannes Film Festival - Opening Ceremony & 'Grace Of Monaco' Premiere - Cannes, France - Wednesday 14th May 2014

Lambert Wilson

The Princess of Montpensier Review


Excellent
Veteran filmmaker Tavernier approaches this 16th century drama with a fresh touch. It has everything you hope for: swashbuckling, romantic intrigue, heaving bosoms. But a blast of realism continually catches us off guard.

The Marquis of Mezieres (Magnan) is only mildly annoyed that his daughter Marie (Thierry) has fallen for suave warrior Henri (Ulliel), even though she's promised to his brother (Domboy). Then a better offer comes along, and the Marquis offers her to Prince Philippe (Leprince-Ringuet), son of the Duke of Montpensier (Vuillermoz). Leaving Marie with his loyal mentor Chabannes (Wilson), Philippe rejoins battle alongside his old friend Henri in the war between the Catholics and the Huguenots. But Philippe soon becomes jealous of Henri, as well as the flirtatious Duke of Anjou (Personnaz).

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The Princess Of Montpensier Trailer


In 16th century France, wars were raging between the Catholics and the Protestants. Heiress Marie de M'ziSres is forced into marriage by her father, the Marquis de M'ziSres to a man she has never met, Prince Philippe de Montpesier. Marie refuses at first, because she's in love with her handsome childhood friend, Henri de Guise.

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Of Gods and Men [Des Hommes et des Dieux] Review


Essential
With very little action, this film builds almost unbearable tension by carefully examining some moral questions in a precarious situation that's based on true events. And in the process, it becomes one of the most important films in recent memory.

Christian (Wilson) is the leader of a group of eight French monks living in a Catholic monastery in rural Algeria. Their only mission is to pray and serve the local people, and over the generations they have become an integral part of the community. When fundamentalist tensions spill into violence in the country around them, they have a difficult decision to make: abandon the people and flee home to France or stand up to the injustice. Opinions are split, but they opt to seek an answer together. And their decision could cost them their lives.

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Dante 01 Review


Weak
Murky and brooding, Marc Caro's Dante 01 is a sci-fi phantasmagoria that wouldn't look out of place in a Clive Barker fever dream. As the film's character and place names suggest (all echoing Dante Alighieri's epic poem, The Inferno), Dante 01 is less about sci-fi action than overdrawn religious allegory.

Dante is a hellish planet (its surface a crackling fire-and-brimstone concoction) in deepest space. Around it orbits a psychiatric facility housing a handful of criminally insane patients, several physicians, and three armed guards. Everyone on the ship (which resembles a golden cross made out of Rubik's cubes) has had their head shaved and slinks around in almost complete darkness. The docs, manning computer screens and a device called the Answerer, experiment on patients who live in a warren of sterile steel corridors in the bowels of the ship. There are a multitude of sub-plots swirling in the miasma: a new doctor, Elisa (Linh Dan Phan), with an experimental nanobot-infused drug, a conspiracy between "warden" Charon (Gérald Laroche), and his prize patient, the hacker Atilla (Yann Collette), an aging (perhaps unstable) lead physician, Persephone (Simona Maicanescu), and a new patient (mute at first and dubbed Saint-Georges, the dragon slayer, played by Lambert Wilson) who can "see" parasites affecting the patients and is either, as the ad copy put its, "a monster or a messiah."

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Private Fears in Public Places Review


Excellent
Here's one no one could have seen coming. Alain Resnais, at the stately age of 84, comes back from a life of harrowing Holocaust documentaries and existential meditations to direct a winter-set play adaptation with a modest multi-narrative pull. Swept with snow-flurry transitions and sunken-in rom-com dynamics, Private Fears in Public Places, besides being the filmmaker's best work since 1977's Providence, brings theatrical adaptation to a new level of complexity and imagination.

It all starts with Thierry (the great André Dussollier), a realtor trying to find an apartment for Nicole (Laura Morante) and her contemptible husband Dan (Lambert Wilson). Thierry is harboring yearnings for his secretary Charlotte (Sabine Azéma), whose scattershot persona lends itself both to the religious and the carnal. Charlotte's night-job finds her taking care of the curmudgeonly father of bartender Lionel (Pierre Arditi) while he is serving drinks to Dan and Thierry's sister Gaelle (Isabelle Carre) at a classy hotel bar. All of this is connected by Charlotte's bible, a mysterious videotape of a woman go-go dancing and the search for a perfect apartment.

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It's Easier for a Camel... Review


Grim
To paraphrase Bogart, the problems of a bunch of rich people don't add up to a hill of beans in this crazy world - this is why your average filmmaker, in order to get an audience to care about disgustingly wealthy characters is to either make them so engaging that one can't help but get emotionally involved or to subject them to truly horrific circumstances that level the economic playing field. It's Easier for a Camel..., an autobiographical story by the actress Valeria Bruni Tedeschi - who wrote, directed and stars in the film - about an Italian family of malcontents living in Paris off their patriarch's vast earnings, does neither of these things, resulting in a distant and distinctly minor piece of work.

Tedeschi plays Federica, a young Italian woman who's trying to make a go of things as a playwright but seems to spend most of her time mooning about in discontent, daydreaming, finding ways to sabotage her relationships, and compulsively going to confession, even though she has nothing to confess. As her working-class, leftist boyfriend Pierre (Jean-Hughes Anglade) reminds her, with the vast sums of money sitting in her bank account, her intermittent writing is actually less a job than a hobby. The film's title is a reference to the Biblical passage about it being easier for a camel to fit through the eye of a needle than for a rich person to enter heaven.

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The Belly of an Architect Review


Unbearable
Architect Stourley Kracklite (Brian Dennehy) arrives in Rome, where an exhibition of the works of the 18th-century architect Etienne-Louis Boullée is being mounted under Kracklite's supervision. The city - or something - doesn't sit with him; upon arrival, he begins complaining of stomach pains. Cancer? Kracklite is sure of it. Or not: It could be that his wife Louisa (Chloe Webb), with whom he is traveling (and who is pregnant with his child), is poisoning him, a revenge for his self-absorption. She may be further motivated in this by the affair she has taken up with Caspasian Speckler (Lambert Wilson), another architect involved with the exhibition. Which brings us back to the exhibition: Boullée's architectural metaphor of choice was the oval, a detail that finds an echo in Louisa's pregnancy and Kracklite's gut; and, in fact, Kracklite soon discovers that Boullée's life in many ways parallels his own. There's the fact too of a Roman statue of Augustus to which Kracklite takes a shine, and the pertinent detail being that Augustus was himself poisoned by his wife Livia. Our hero, among other eccentric behaviors, begins xeroxing photos of the statue's stomach...

So it is that Peter Greenaway's The Belly of an Architect is crammed to bursting with symbolism, analogy, and allusion, all loosed within a circular plot wherein the film opens with the architect and his wife conceiving a child and closes with the opening of Boullée's exhibition, Kracklite's real "baby." But for many viewers, I believe, the most telling parallel is that between Kracklite, with his perpetual stomach upset, and director Greenaway: Both are pretentious gasbags. Another quick connection is that between the "belly" of the title and "taste." The secret subtext of all of Greenaway's work is that his taste is good, or at least arcane in a high-minded way (and despite a predilection for bodily functions that is present in most of his films, which in less tony productions would rightly be termed sophomoric). The viewer is invited to share in this, but it's made clear that those who don't (or who can't follow his esoteric web of allusion) are either pigs (as was the villain in Greenaway's major success, 1989's The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover), philistines, or merely dim.

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Rendez-vous Review


OK
Good news for you pervs out there: Juliette Binoche spends virtually the entirety of Rendez-vous buck naked, usually begging for sex from one of two men she's just met. At 20 years old, she may look like a teenage boy, but hey, that's the price of gratuitous nudity.

Rendez-vous begins with aspiring actress Nina (Binoche) fresh off the boat in Paris, where she immediately falls into bed with both real estate clerk Paulot (Wadeck Stanczak) and his in-your-face roommate Quentin (Lambert Wilson). Soon enough, secrecy is put aside and the whole affair becomes a messy conflagration of emotion and raw sexuality.

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The Last September Review


Grim
I really wanted to like The Last September. Sunday afternoon, really in the mood for a period piece, I sat down with the promising flick... and got a tired old romantic triangle flick set in 1920s Ireland that plodded along with little regard for the audience. The setting here is elusive: The title refers obliquely to Ireland's last September before its revolution, but the backdrop of war barely registers above the genteel performances and sleepy script.
Lambert Wilson

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