Lambert Wilson

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5 To 7 Trailer


Arielle and Valéry don't exactly have a conventional marriage, they're happy enough and have two children together but they openly embrace the company of other extramarital partners - well, that is as long as the relationship doesn't involve kissing or any other physical contact.

When a chance meeting leads Arielle to make friends with gifted writer Brian, they instantly have a connection. He's quiet and much longer than the French mother, but it's obvious that both Arielle and Brian would like to meet again.

As Arielle begins to tell Brian that she can see Brian again between the hours of 5 and 7 she opens up to the youngster tells him about her French diplomat husband and their children. The information is hard to digest for Brian but feeling that their friendship is worth exploring further, Brian agrees to Arielle's rules. As their relationship deepens, Brian introduces Arielle to his parents; although obviously older than their son, she's a beautiful woman who both can see making their son happy - that is until they find out about the peculiar arrangement. As the pair grow closer, a relationship with no physical bond becomes ever harder. 2 hours a day isn't enough time for Brian and he wishes for far more than he knows he should morally ask for. Is there a way for Arielle and Brian's relationship to work?

Continue: 5 To 7 Trailer

Eva Herzigova and Lambert Wilson - 68th Cannes Film Festival - A variety of celebrities were photographed as they arrived to amfAR's Cinema Against Aids Gala which was held at the Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc as part of the Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, France - Thursday 21st May 2015

Eva Herzigova and Lambert Wilson
Eva Herzigova
Eva Herzigova
Eva Herzigova
Eva Herzigova
Eva Herzigova

Suite Francaise Trailer


During the Second World War, France was quickly and violently taken over by the German army. Now, under enemy occupation, the residents find themselves having to house and shelter their victorious enemies. Lucille Angellier (Michelle Williams) is one of these people, having to share her house with Commander Bruno von Falk (Matthias Schoenaerts). Despite being on two different sides of the conflict, the two find a strange attraction to one-another, and a romance begins to blossom. But Madame Angellier (Kristin Scott Thomas), Lucille's mother-in-law, distrusts the German officer, leading to a series of events that will test the strength of love and trust, in a time of war.

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Lambert Wilson - The 67th Annual Cannes Film Festival - Closing Ceremony - Outside - Cannes, France - Saturday 24th May 2014

Lambert Wilson

Lambert Wilson - 67th Cannes Film Festival - Opening Ceremony - Cannes, France - Wednesday 14th May 2014

Lambert Wilson
Lambert Wilson
Lambert Wilson
Lambert Wilson

Lambert Wilson - The 67th Annual Cannes Film Festival - Opening Ceremony & 'Grace Of Monaco' Premiere - Cannes, France - Wednesday 14th May 2014

Lambert Wilson
Lambert Wilson and Nicole Kidman
Lambert Wilson and Nicole Kidman
Lambert Wilson
Lambert Wilson and Nicole Kidman
Lambert Wilson and Nicole Kidman

Lambert Wilson - Lumiere 2013 Grand Lyon Film Festival - Opening Ceremony - Lyon, France - Monday 14th October 2013

Lambert Wilson

The Princess Of Montpensier Review


Excellent
Veteran filmmaker Tavernier approaches this 16th century drama with a fresh touch. It has everything you hope for: swashbuckling, romantic intrigue, heaving bosoms. But a blast of realism continually catches us off guard.

The Marquis of Mezieres (Magnan) is only mildly annoyed that his daughter Marie (Thierry) has fallen for suave warrior Henri (Ulliel), even though she's promised to his brother (Domboy). Then a better offer comes along, and the Marquis offers her to Prince Philippe (Leprince-Ringuet), son of the Duke of Montpensier (Vuillermoz). Leaving Marie with his loyal mentor Chabannes (Wilson), Philippe rejoins battle alongside his old friend Henri in the war between the Catholics and the Huguenots. But Philippe soon becomes jealous of Henri, as well as the flirtatious Duke of Anjou (Personnaz).

Continue reading: The Princess Of Montpensier Review

The Princess Of Montpensier Trailer


In 16th century France, wars were raging between the Catholics and the Protestants. Heiress Marie de M'ziSres is forced into marriage by her father, the Marquis de M'ziSres to a man she has never met, Prince Philippe de Montpesier. Marie refuses at first, because she's in love with her handsome childhood friend, Henri de Guise.

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Of Gods And Men [Des Hommes Et Des Dieux] Review


Essential
With very little action, this film builds almost unbearable tension by carefully examining some moral questions in a precarious situation that's based on true events. And in the process, it becomes one of the most important films in recent memory.

Christian (Wilson) is the leader of a group of eight French monks living in a Catholic monastery in rural Algeria. Their only mission is to pray and serve the local people, and over the generations they have become an integral part of the community. When fundamentalist tensions spill into violence in the country around them, they have a difficult decision to make: abandon the people and flee home to France or stand up to the injustice. Opinions are split, but they opt to seek an answer together. And their decision could cost them their lives.

Continue reading: Of Gods And Men [Des Hommes Et Des Dieux] Review

The Belly Of An Architect Review


Terrible
Architect Stourley Kracklite (Brian Dennehy) arrives in Rome, where an exhibition of the works of the 18th-century architect Etienne-Louis Boullée is being mounted under Kracklite's supervision. The city - or something - doesn't sit with him; upon arrival, he begins complaining of stomach pains. Cancer? Kracklite is sure of it. Or not: It could be that his wife Louisa (Chloe Webb), with whom he is traveling (and who is pregnant with his child), is poisoning him, a revenge for his self-absorption. She may be further motivated in this by the affair she has taken up with Caspasian Speckler (Lambert Wilson), another architect involved with the exhibition. Which brings us back to the exhibition: Boullée's architectural metaphor of choice was the oval, a detail that finds an echo in Louisa's pregnancy and Kracklite's gut; and, in fact, Kracklite soon discovers that Boullée's life in many ways parallels his own. There's the fact too of a Roman statue of Augustus to which Kracklite takes a shine, and the pertinent detail being that Augustus was himself poisoned by his wife Livia. Our hero, among other eccentric behaviors, begins xeroxing photos of the statue's stomach...

So it is that Peter Greenaway's The Belly of an Architect is crammed to bursting with symbolism, analogy, and allusion, all loosed within a circular plot wherein the film opens with the architect and his wife conceiving a child and closes with the opening of Boullée's exhibition, Kracklite's real "baby." But for many viewers, I believe, the most telling parallel is that between Kracklite, with his perpetual stomach upset, and director Greenaway: Both are pretentious gasbags. Another quick connection is that between the "belly" of the title and "taste." The secret subtext of all of Greenaway's work is that his taste is good, or at least arcane in a high-minded way (and despite a predilection for bodily functions that is present in most of his films, which in less tony productions would rightly be termed sophomoric). The viewer is invited to share in this, but it's made clear that those who don't (or who can't follow his esoteric web of allusion) are either pigs (as was the villain in Greenaway's major success, 1989's The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover), philistines, or merely dim.

Continue reading: The Belly Of An Architect Review

Rendez-vous Review


Good
Good news for you pervs out there: Juliette Binoche spends virtually the entirety of Rendez-vous buck naked, usually begging for sex from one of two men she's just met. At 20 years old, she may look like a teenage boy, but hey, that's the price of gratuitous nudity.

Rendez-vous begins with aspiring actress Nina (Binoche) fresh off the boat in Paris, where she immediately falls into bed with both real estate clerk Paulot (Wadeck Stanczak) and his in-your-face roommate Quentin (Lambert Wilson). Soon enough, secrecy is put aside and the whole affair becomes a messy conflagration of emotion and raw sexuality.

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The Matrix Reloaded Review


Weak

Here's your review of "The Matrix Reloaded" in a nutshell: One incredibly cool, gravity-defying, CGI-aided, swirling-camera kung-fu melee; one jaw-dropping, 100-mph, against-traffic freeway chase; and way, way too much long-winded, expository, circular, self-important, pseudo-philosophical yappity-yappity-yap.

Writing-directing brothers Larry and Andy Wachowski saddle their cast with endless equivocal prattle while toiling to buttress the complex plot and metaphysical undertone of this picture's uber-stylish 1999 predecessor, which saw what we think is the real world exposed as an elaborate virtual reality prison for the minds of all humanity. Mankind's suspended bodies provide a power source for a race of machines, which a small band of escapees are hoping to destroy in the post-apocalyptic world outside the Matrix.

"We can never see past the choices we don't understand," sage but elusive cyber-prophet The Oracle (Gloria Foster) preaches cryptically to Neo (Keanu Reeves), the cyber-Messianic hero whose realization that physical laws don't apply in the Matrix led to the first film's groundbreaking wire-work martial arts fights and bullet-dodging slow-mo stunts.

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Catwoman Review


Good

One of the hassles of a four-star rating system for movie reviews is that at first glance it can appear to put an enjoyably bad movie on equal footing with a really good one -- case in point, this week's two big studio releases.

Inventive, original and packed with uncommonly intelligent action, "The Bourne Supremacy" is an example of a great three-star movie -- one that I toyed with giving another half-star, but while it's on the "great" end of "good," it didn't quite cross the threshold into "extraordinary." (I hope that makes some kind of sense.)

But "Catwoman" is a whole different kind of three-star movie -- one so blundering, so badly written, so ripped to shreds by the actors chewing the scenery, so pretentiously self-serious, and yet seemingly aware of its own off-the-charts camp value -- that it is wildly entertaining, but for all the wrong reasons.

Continue reading: Catwoman Review

The Matrix Revolutions Review


OK

The eye-popping, heart-stopping last hour and a half of "The Matrix Revolutions" more than makes up for everything plodding and ponderous that has taken place since the mind-blowing first hour of the 1999 original.

Astonishing in scale and momentous in scope, it encompasses a spectacular battle between the scrappy, out-numbered but heavily armed defenders of Zion (humanity's last refugee city hidden deep beneath the Earth's scorched surface) and a million-strong swarm of enemy sentinels (those frightening, giant squid-shaped robots) invading from the machine-ruled surface world.

But the monstrous melee may be for naught if uber-human messiah Neo (Keanu Reeves) cannot defeat the invincibly evil, incalculably self-replicating rogue computer program known as Agent Smith (Hugo Weaving) in a simultaneous, nuclear-strength airborne-kung-fu showdown inside what's left of the crumbling Matrix (that virtual world pulled over the eyes of the comatose majority of mankind kept in stasis by the machines who feed off our life-force).

Continue reading: The Matrix Revolutions Review

Lambert Wilson

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Lambert Wilson Movies

5 To 7 Trailer

5 To 7 Trailer

Arielle and Valéry don't exactly have a conventional marriage, they're happy enough and have two...

Suite Francaise Trailer

Suite Francaise Trailer

During the Second World War, France was quickly and violently taken over by the German...

The Princess of Montpensier Movie Review

The Princess of Montpensier Movie Review

Veteran filmmaker Tavernier approaches this 16th century drama with a fresh touch. It has everything...

The Princess Of Montpensier Trailer

The Princess Of Montpensier Trailer

In 16th century France, wars were raging between the Catholics and the Protestants. Heiress Marie...

Of Gods and Men [Des Hommes et des Dieux] Movie Review

Of Gods and Men [Des Hommes et des Dieux] Movie Review

With very little action, this film builds almost unbearable tension by carefully examining some moral...

Babylon A.D Trailer

Babylon A.D Trailer

Watch the trailer for Babylon A.D.When a mercenary (Vin Diesel) is asked to deliver a...

Private Fears in Public Places Movie Review

Private Fears in Public Places Movie Review

Here's one no one could have seen coming. Alain Resnais, at the stately age of...

It's Easier for a Camel... Movie Review

It's Easier for a Camel... Movie Review

To paraphrase Bogart, the problems of a bunch of rich people don't add up to...

Timeline Movie Review

Timeline Movie Review

At least one can be thankful for a movie like Timeline that hires Billy Connolly...

Catwoman Movie Review

Catwoman Movie Review

After Catwoman, I feel I've learned a lot about the furry beasts. For instance, did...

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